Search Results

Author: Allen, Jennifer
Resulting in 11 citations.
1. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Age Difference in Relationships between Depression and Sleep among Young Adult Men
Journal of Men's Health published online (28 June 2022): DOI: 10.31083/j.jomh1807142.
Also: https://www.imrpress.com/journal/JOMH/18/7/10.31083/j.jomh1807142
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: IMR Press
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Depression (see also CESD); Sleep

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: There has been little evidence regarding how age influences the association between depression and sleep among young adult men. Thus, the current study explores the relationship between depression and sleep among young adult men and the moderating effect of age on the association.

Methods: The present research employed a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 for Children and Young Adults. A total of 2777 men were selected for the final sample. A moderation model was used to identify the moderating effect of age on the relationship between depression and sleep.

Results: Depression was negatively related to hours of sleep among young adult men and age was negatively associated with hours of sleep. An interaction effect was found, indicating that age significantly moderated the association between depression and hours of sleep among young adult men.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Age Difference in Relationships between Depression and Sleep among Young Adult Men." Journal of Men's Health published online (28 June 2022): DOI: 10.31083/j.jomh1807142.
2. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Gender Differences in Healthy and Unhealthy Food Consumption and Its Relationship with Depression in Young Adulthood
Community Mental Health Journal 57 (2021): 898-909.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10597-020-00672-x
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Gender Differences; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study explores the relationship between the consumption of healthy and unhealthy foods and depression among young adults and the moderating effect of gender on these relationships. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) was used. A total of 2983 young adults were selected for the final sample. Logistic Regression Analysis and Ordinary Linear Regression were conducted to examine the research questions. Young men were overall more likely than young women to engage in negative eating habits. The consumption of healthy foods, which included fruits and vegetables, had a significant inverse relationship with depression. An interaction effect was found, indicating that gender moderated the relationship between fruit consumption and depression among young adults. Young males need to be taught more about the importance of good eating habits. Eating more fruits and vegetables (healthy foods) is more important than avoiding fast food or soft drinks (unhealthy foods) for young adults' mental health. The gender differences in the effect of fruit consumption implies that increased fruit consumption may be critical to reduce young females' depression.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Gender Differences in Healthy and Unhealthy Food Consumption and Its Relationship with Depression in Young Adulthood." Community Mental Health Journal 57 (2021): 898-909.
3. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Inequality in the Intergenerational Economic Mobility in Single Mother-headed Households
Children and Youth Services Review 139 (August 2022): 106566.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S019074092200202X
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Parents, Single; Poverty

Objective: This study examines the underlying pathway of intergenerational economic mobility within single mother-headed families by considering the mediating role of young adult children's educational attainment.

Methods: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were used to pair data from single mothers and their young adult children. A total of 3,139 single mother and young adult children pairs were chosen for analysis. Ordinary least squares and logistic regression analysis were employed to examine the mediation model.

Results: Single mothers' poverty status was negatively associated with both their young adult children's educational attainment and income. The young adult children's educational attainment was positively related to their income. Results showed a full mediation of the relationship between single mothers' poverty status and their young adult children's income via their young adult children's educational attainment.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Inequality in the Intergenerational Economic Mobility in Single Mother-headed Households." Children and Youth Services Review 139 (August 2022): 106566.
4. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Mother's Educational Attainment and their Young Adult Daughters' Fast Food Intake: The Role of Race/Ethnicity
Health Care for Women International 41,2 (2020): 169-187.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07399332.2019.1669606
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Ethnic Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Education; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The relationship between mothers' educational attainment and their daughters' fast food intake and the moderating effect of race/ethnicity on the relationship was examined. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were used. Young women with mothers who received higher education were less likely to eat fast food. Race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between mothers' educational attainment and their young adult daughters' fast food intake. Through this study, we seek to understand the intergenerational relationship between mother and daughter and the effect of mothers' education on their young adult children's fast food consumption. Providing more opportunities for mothers to increase their educational attainment should be considered to reduce their children's fast food intake. Mothers’ educational attainment should be focused on more closely for non-Hispanic Whites as a factor to reduce young women’s fast food intake, and other economic factors should be considered to understand the role of mothers' educational attainment among African Americans and Hispanic/Latinas.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Mother's Educational Attainment and their Young Adult Daughters' Fast Food Intake: The Role of Race/Ethnicity." Health Care for Women International 41,2 (2020): 169-187.
5. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Mothers' Income and Young Adult Children's Education and Fast Food Intake
American Journal of Health Behavior 44,5 (September 2020): 681-690.
Also: https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/png/ajhb/2020/00000044/00000005/art00011
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: PNG Publications
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Mothers, Income; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: In this study, we examine young adult children's educational attainment as a mediator in the pathway from their mother's income to their fast food consumption.

Methods: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were used to select mother and children dyads. A total of 5140 dyads were selected as the final sample. We used a mediation model to test mediators in the relationship between mother's income and young adult children's fast food consumption.

Results: Mother's income was significantly related to their young adult children's educational attainment. Mother's income was negatively related to fast food consumption. This study revealed partial mediation of the relationship between mother's income and their young adult children's fast food consumption via their young adult children's educational attainment.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Mothers' Income and Young Adult Children's Education and Fast Food Intake." American Journal of Health Behavior 44,5 (September 2020): 681-690.
6. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
The Intergenerational Transmission of Income Mobility between Mothers and their Young Adult Daughters: The Mediating Role of their Daughters' Educational Attainment
Social Policy and Administration: An International Journal of Policy and Research published online (21 July 2020): DOI: 10.1111/spol.12631.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/spol.12631
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Mothers and Daughters

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines whether the daughters' educational attainment mediates the intergenerational transmission of economic mobility between mothers and their young adult daughters. To create mother-daughter dyads, two data sets were combined: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY). A total of 2,456 dyads were included for analysis. We used a mediation model to explore the relationship between mothers' income and their young adult daughters' income. Mothers' income was associated with their young adult daughters' educational attainment and income. The mediation model indicated partial mediation of the relationship between mothers' income and their young adult daughters' income via their young adult daughters' educational attainment. Addressing issues of income inequality among mothers may serve as a buffer against the low upward mobility across generations for their young adult daughters raised by low‐income mothers. It is imperative to provide programs and financial assistance for mothers to bolster their income and thereby their daughters' educational attainment and income in young adulthood and therefore improve economic mobility from mothers to daughters.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Income Mobility between Mothers and their Young Adult Daughters: The Mediating Role of their Daughters' Educational Attainment." Social Policy and Administration: An International Journal of Policy and Research published online (21 July 2020): DOI: 10.1111/spol.12631.
7. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
The Role of Young Adult Children's Income in the Relationship between Single Mothers' Poverty and Their Young Adult Children's Depression
Journal of Family Issues published online (6 January 2021): DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984497.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0192513X20984497
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Parents, Single; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examined the relationship between single mother's poverty and their young adult children's depression, and it examined the mediating effect of young adults' income on the relationship. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were used. A total of 4,224 dyads were selected and the mediation model was conducted. Single mother's poverty was related to low income and depression among their young adult children. The relationship between mother's poverty and their young adult children's depression was partially mediated by their young adult children's income. Poverty prevention or reduction programs for female-headed households should be provided to single mothers to reduce future levels of depression among their young adults. Improving inequality in intergenerational economic mobility is one way to address depressive symptoms among the young adult children of single mothers in poverty.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "The Role of Young Adult Children's Income in the Relationship between Single Mothers' Poverty and Their Young Adult Children's Depression." Journal of Family Issues published online (6 January 2021): DOI: 10.1177/0192513X20984497.
8. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Young Adults' Economic Well-Being and Mental Health: The Mediation Model of Self-Esteem
American Journal of Psychology 133,3 (Fall 2020): 329-339.
Also: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/amerjpsyc.133.3.0329
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Economic Well-Being; Health, Mental/Psychological; Self-Esteem

This study examined the relationship between economic well-being and mental health in young adults and investigated the mediating effects of young adults' self-esteem. This study used the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults. 9,584 young adults were selected, and the mediation model was conducted. Results showed that economic well-being is related to self-esteem and depression during adulthood. Self-esteem is significantly associated with mental health among young adults. Results show evidence of partial mediation of the relationship between economic well-being and mental health by young adults' self-esteem. Economic well-being is one of the most important factors to develop and cultivate self-esteem and reduce mental health problems during young adulthood. Economic well-being is critical for developing self-esteem during young adulthood, and this study reveals that developing higher self-esteem is important for one's mental health during young adulthood. Self-esteem should be considered to better understand mental health during young adulthood in the context of individuals' economic well-being.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Young Adults' Economic Well-Being and Mental Health: The Mediation Model of Self-Esteem." American Journal of Psychology 133,3 (Fall 2020): 329-339.
9. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Young Women's Food Consumption and Mental Health: The Role of Employment
BMC Women's Health 22, 91 (March 2022): DOI: 10.1186/s12905-022-01675-4.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12905-022-01675-4
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Employment; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: This study explores the relationship between young women's consumption of healthy and unhealthy food and depression and examines the moderating effect of their employment status on the relationship.

Methods: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) was used for this study. The final sample included a total of 1524 young women aged from 18 to 35 years. Multiple Linear Regression was conducted to answer the research questions.

Results: Fast food consumption was related to higher levels of depression among young women while fruit intake was associated with lower levels of depression. Employment status moderated the relationship between young women's fruit consumption and depression.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon and Jennifer Allen. "Young Women's Food Consumption and Mental Health: The Role of Employment." BMC Women's Health 22, 91 (March 2022): DOI: 10.1186/s12905-022-01675-4.
10. Lee, Jaewon
Allen, Jennifer
Lim, Hyejung
The Effect of Single Mothers’ Employment on Their Children’s Mental Health in Young Adulthood: Random Effects Model for Longitudinal Data
Children and Youth Services Review 160 (May 2024) 107585.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740924001579?via%3Dihub
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Development; Childhood; Childhood Education, Early; Childhood, Early; Children; Children, Emotional Development; Children, Mental Health; Children, Preschool; Depression (see also CESD); Job Training; Motherhood; Mothers; Mothers, Single; Mothers, Working; Pregnancy; Self-Esteem; Training, Occupational

Objective: Based on a longitudinal approach, this study explores the effect of single mothers’ employment from pregnancy to their children’s preschool years on their adult children’s self-esteem and depression.

Methods: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79 for Children and Young Adults (NLSY79 CY) were employed to pair mothers and their adult children. We used six NLSY79 CY waves from 2004 to 2014. A total of 2,596 single mother-headed household dyads were selected. Variables repeatedly measured at six points in time were tested using the Random Effects Model.

Results: Results show that single mothers’ higher frequency of employment from pregnancy to when their children were four years old was significantly related to their children’s self-esteem and depression at above the age of 18 years.

Discussion: Providing more opportunities for single mothers to get a job is necessary to enhance their children’s mental health over time. Accessible job training programs for single mothers and free provision of accessible and high-quality childcare services by the government should be focused on single mothers, particularly those who are pregnant or have children under the age of 5 years, for their children to positively develop self-esteem and reduce depression over time. The intergenerational transmission of inequality between single mothers and their adult children can be addressed by providing more opportunities for well-paying stable jobs with flexible schedules to single mothers, so they are better able to provide their children with time, support and resources.

Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon, Jennifer Allen and Hyejung Lim. "The Effect of Single Mothers’ Employment on Their Children’s Mental Health in Young Adulthood: Random Effects Model for Longitudinal Data." Children and Youth Services Review 160 (May 2024) 107585.
11. Lee, Jaewon
Lim, Hyejung
Allen, Jennifer
A Hybrid Model for the Intergenerational Relationship Between Maternal Poverty and Their Young Adult Child’s Self-Esteem
Lee, J., Lim, H., & Allen, J. (2023). A Hybrid Model for the Intergenerational Relationship Between Maternal Poverty and Their Young Adult Child’s Self-Esteem. Journal of Family Issues, 0(0).
Also: https://doi.org/10.1177/0192513X231181365
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Income; Poverty; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study aims to examine how mothers’ poverty differently affects young adult children’s self-esteem over time. We consider how young adult children’s income moderates the between-subject relationship and the within-subject relationship. This study used two data sets such as the NLSY79 and the NLSY79CY. We used six waves from 2004 to 2014. A total of 3975 mother–adult child dyads were chosen. The hybrid model was employed to explore both the between-subject and the within-subject relationship. There was a significant between-subject relationship regarding the effect of mothers’ poverty and adult children’s income on adult children’s self-esteem. In the between-subjects relationship, an interaction effect was found, such that children’s income moderated the between-subject relationship between mothers’ poverty and children’s self-esteem. Long-term anti-poverty programs should be provided to women with children even after they completely are away from poverty. Minimizing inequality in intergenerational economic mobility may be critical to enhance adult children’s self-esteem.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jaewon, Hyejung Lim and Jennifer Allen. "A Hybrid Model for the Intergenerational Relationship Between Maternal Poverty and Their Young Adult Child’s Self-Esteem." Lee, J., Lim, H., & Allen, J. (2023). A Hybrid Model for the Intergenerational Relationship Between Maternal Poverty and Their Young Adult Child’s Self-Esteem. Journal of Family Issues, 0(0). A.