Search Results

Author: Asoni, Andrea
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Asoni, Andrea
Essays in Entrepreneurship
Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Chicago, 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): College Education; Entrepreneurship; Intelligence; Self-Employed Workers; Self-Esteem; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This thesis has two chapters. In the first chapter, I study the effect of college education, intelligence, and self-confidence on entrepreneurship using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - 1979. Controlling for intelligence and self-confidence I find that college education has no effect on business survival, but increases the probability of becoming an entrepreneur. Intelligence boosts business survival, even accounting for selection. Moreover smarter individuals are more likely to start incorporated firms but less likely to found unincorporated ones. Self-confidence increases the likelihood of starting a firm and has a positive effect on business survival. These results suggest that existing conflicting evidence on this topic is driven by the failure to effectively control for unobserved characteristics.

In the second chapter, which is a joint work with Tino Sanandaji, we study the effect of taxation on entrepreneurship, taking into account both the amount of entry and the quality of new ventures. We show that even with risk neutral agents and no tax evasion progressive taxes can increase entrepreneurial entry, while reducing average firm quality. So called "success taxes" increase startup of lower value business ideas by reducing the option value of pursuing better projects. This suggests that the most common measure used in the literature, the likelihood of entry into self-employment, may underestimate the adverse effect of taxation.

Bibliography Citation
Asoni, Andrea. Essays in Entrepreneurship. Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Economics, University of Chicago, 2011.
2. Asoni, Andrea
Intelligence, Self-confidence and Entrepreneurship
Working Paper No. 887. Research Institute of Industrial Economics, October 2011. Also, http://www.ifn.se/eng/publications/wp/2011_4/887
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN)
Keyword(s): College Education; Entrepreneurship; Human Capital; Intelligence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

I investigate the effect of human capital on entrepreneurship using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979. I find that individuals with higher measured intelligence and self-confidence are more likely to be entrepreneurs. Furthermore I present evidence suggesting that intelligence and self-confidence affect business ownership through two different channels: intelligence increases business survival while self-confidence increases business creation. Finally, once we control for intelligence and self-confidence the effect of formal college education almost completely vanishes. These results are robust to controlling for selection into entrepreneurship and selection into college.
Bibliography Citation
Asoni, Andrea. "Intelligence, Self-confidence and Entrepreneurship." Working Paper No. 887. Research Institute of Industrial Economics, October 2011. Also, http://www.ifn.se/eng/publications/wp/2011_4/887.
3. Asoni, Andrea
What Drives Entrepreneurship?
Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Chicago, November 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Department of Economics, University of Chicago
Keyword(s): College Education; Entrepreneurship; Intelligence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

I study the effect of college education, intelligence, and self-confidence on entrepreneurship using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth- 979. Controlling for intelligence and self- confidence I find that college education has no effect on business survival, but increases the probability of becoming an entrepreneur. Intelligence boosts business survival, even accounting for selection. Moreover smarter individuals are more likely to start incorporated firms but less likely to found unincorporated ones. Self-confidence increases the likelihood of starting a firm and has a weak positive effect on business survival. These results suggest that existing conflicting evidence on this topic is driven by the failure to effectively control for unobserved characteristics.
Bibliography Citation
Asoni, Andrea. "What Drives Entrepreneurship?" Working Paper, Department of Economics, University of Chicago, November 2010.
4. Asoni, Andrea
Sanandaji, Tino
Identifying the Effect of College Education on Business and Employment Survival
Small Business Economics 46,2 (February 2016): 311-324.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11187-015-9686-5
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); College Degree; Educational Attainment; Employment; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Self-Employed Workers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We use a multipronged identification strategy to estimate the effect of college education on business and employment survival. We account for the endogeneity of both education and business ownership with a competing risks duration model augmented with a college selection equation. We estimate the model jointly on the self-employed and salaried employees in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Unlike most previous studies, we find that college does not increase business survival. By contrast, a college degree significantly increases employment survival. Cognitive skills have a positive impact on survival for both the self-employed and employees. These findings suggest that college benefits the self-employed less than salaried, perhaps by generating skills more useful in employment than self-employment, or because of differences in the value of signaling.
Bibliography Citation
Asoni, Andrea and Tino Sanandaji. "Identifying the Effect of College Education on Business and Employment Survival." Small Business Economics 46,2 (February 2016): 311-324.