Search Results

Author: Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Comparing Foster Youth and Non-Foster Youth in Emerging Adulthood: Evaluating Their Experiences Using Propensity Score Methodology and Traditional Matching
Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California - Berkeley, 2005. DAI-A 67/04, Oct 2006
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Demography; Foster Care; Propensity Scores; Transition, Adulthood; Transition, School to Work

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As previous research indicated that foster youth struggle in the primary domains of emerging adulthood (i.e., the school to work transition; the move to independent housing; formation of adult relationships; and parenthood), there is growing concern that foster youth need additional assistance during this period. Though these studies are robust in pinpointing difficulties for foster youth, they provide limited insight into the possible causes. Given that foster youth share many characteristics with other youth who struggle during this period, it is unclear whether foster care, existing risk factors, or a combination of the two creates challenges for foster youth. The primary objective of this dissertation was to examine the relationship between these factors and the transition to adulthood for foster youth.

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this dissertation compared the transition outcomes of foster and non-foster care youth. Youth were matched using propensity score methodology, which models the likelihood to be in foster care based on a set of pre-existing characteristics, and traditional matching methods based on demographic characteristics (i.e., gender, race, age, parent's education, income, and having a stepparent). Bivariate and multivariate analysis revealed that foster youth fared worse than unmatched youth in all transition domains. However, outcomes were similar for foster youth and youth matched using propensity scoring in all domains except housing. This suggests that the pre-existing characteristics that put youth at risk for foster care may contribute to their difficulties in emerging adulthood rather than the experience of foster care itself. Findings using the traditionally matched samples showed some group differences suggesting that a larger set of attributes than those matched on contribute to foster youth difficulties. Analyses examining interaction effects between foster care and characteristics associated with negative transition outcomes did not identify any particularly vulnerable subgroups of foster youth. These findings are a substantive departure from past research, which suggested that foster youth were falling behind youth in the general population and comparison youth. Findings from this dissertation are used to provide policy and practice recommendations for foster youth and other vulnerable youth.

Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner. Comparing Foster Youth and Non-Foster Youth in Emerging Adulthood: Evaluating Their Experiences Using Propensity Score Methodology and Traditional Matching. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of California - Berkeley, 2005. DAI-A 67/04, Oct 2006.
2. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Difficulties in the Transition to Adulthood: Using Propensity Scoring to Understand What Makes Foster Youth Vulnerable
Social Service Review 82,2 (June 2008): 171-196.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/pss/10.1086/588417
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Foster Care; Propensity Scores; Transition, Adulthood

Research indicates that foster youth approaching adulthood fare poorly on a number of economic and social outcomes. Little is known, however, about whether negative outcomes stem from foster care or risk factors common among youth who have foster care experience. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and eight distinct matching schemes, this study compares outcomes of foster youth (n = 136) to those of other youth. These schemes are based on propensity scoring and Mahalanobis matching. Results locate similar outcomes for foster youth and youth matched on preplacement characteristics. Foster youth have more problematic outcomes than do youth in the general sample that is not matched. The results suggest that risk factors, and not foster care itself, contribute to difficulties that occur in the transition to adulthood. These findings must be cautiously interpreted in light of study limitations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Social Service Review is the property of University of Chicago Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner. "Difficulties in the Transition to Adulthood: Using Propensity Scoring to Understand What Makes Foster Youth Vulnerable." Social Service Review 82,2 (June 2008): 171-196.
3. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Understanding Foster Youth Outcomes: Is Propensity Scoring Better Than Traditional Methods?
Research on Social Work Practice 20,1 (January 2010): 100-111.
Also: http://rsw.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/20/1/100
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; Foster Care; Propensity Scores

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: This study seeks to examine the relationship between foster care and outcomes using multiple comparison methods to account for factors that put foster youth at risk independent of care. Methods: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, matching, propensity scoring, and comparisons to the general population are used to examine whether results differ depending on the matching strategy. Results: Propensity scoring produces a better model and more closely matched groups than traditional matching. No group differences emerge in outcomes using propensity scoring; however, differences emerge in other schemes. Conclusions: When examining outcomes for foster youth, it is important to consider multiple matching strategies, as this may affect results. Propensity scoring may be one approach to inform child welfare practice. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Research on Social Work Practice is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner. "Understanding Foster Youth Outcomes: Is Propensity Scoring Better Than Traditional Methods?" Research on Social Work Practice 20,1 (January 2010): 100-111.
4. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Vulnerability in the Transition to Adulthood: Defining Risk Based on Youth Profiles
Children and Youth Services Review 32,4 (April 2010): 487-495.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740909003119
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; Dropouts; Educational Status; Gender Differences; Home Environment; Modeling, Logit; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Racial Differences; Resilience/Developmental Assets; Risk-Taking; Transition, Adulthood

In spite of an extended transition to adulthood for many segments of the population, many youth still struggle considerably with transition outcomes. With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N =8984), this study uses latent class analysis to identify patterns of youth development in emerging adulthood based on education level and social outcomes. These classes are used to identify risk and protective factors for class membership. Four profiles of youth were identified with two groups showing positive outcomes and two groups struggling considerably. Bivariate and cumulative logit analysis shows that demographic characteristics, childhood home environment, and psychosocial resources predict class membership. Involvement in youth-serving government systems is associated with poorer outcomes and remains salient when considered with other risk factors. The emergence of this new developmental stage requires a reexamination of vulnerability and how we understand risk and resiliency during this period. [Copyright Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner. "Vulnerability in the Transition to Adulthood: Defining Risk Based on Youth Profiles." Children and Youth Services Review 32,4 (April 2010): 487-495.
5. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Rhodes, Alison M.
Curtis, Marah A.
Housing Experiences of Former Foster Youth: How Do They Fare in Comparison to Other Youth?
Children and Youth Services Review 33,11 (November 2011): 2119-2126.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0190740911002325
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Foster Care; Public Housing; Transition, Adulthood

Research indicates that foster youth tend to fare poorly in a number of domains in the transition to adulthood, and the shift to independent living may be particularly challenging. However, it is unclear whether negative housing outcomes are attributable to foster care history or if they are due to other risk factors. This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to compare housing outcomes for foster youth to a matched sample of youth who share similar risk factors and to an unmatched sample. Results indicate that foster youth struggle more in the transition to independent living in comparison to both groups, showing higher rates of homelessness, less housing stability, poorer neighborhood quality, and more reliance on public housing assistance. The paper explores how factors related to foster care and confounding risk factors that tend to have higher prevalence among foster youth may contribute to these outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner, Alison M. Rhodes and Marah A. Curtis. "Housing Experiences of Former Foster Youth: How Do They Fare in Comparison to Other Youth?" Children and Youth Services Review 33,11 (November 2011): 2119-2126.
6. Berzin, Stephanie Cosner
Rhodes, Alison M.
Curtis, Marah A.
Understanding the Housing Experience of Former Foster Youth During the Transition to Adulthood
Presented: Tampa FL, Society for Social Work and Research 15th Annual Conference, January 2011
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR)
Keyword(s): Foster Care; Mobility, Residential; Residence; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background and Purpose: While evidence has mounted that former foster youth face multiple challenges as they transition to adulthood, research has been less explicit in examining how they fare in particular domains. Some research has suggested that former foster youth fare similarly to comparison youth, while other research has suggested their disparity to matched youth or youth in the general population. One domain that seems particular salient for investigation is housing, as former foster youth often face multiple moves during childhood, may have limited familial support, and/or may face an institutionally-forced move during emancipation from care. The present study explores housing outcomes and stability for former foster youth during the transition to adulthood in comparison to other youth.

Methods: Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, this study compared the housing experiences of former foster youth (n=126), matched youth (n=126), and non-matched youth in the general population (n=8194). The matched sample was created using propensity scoring to model the likelihood to be in foster care based on a set of pre-existing characteristics. Propensity scores were created using nearest neighbor 1 to 1 matching with caliper .25σ. Bivariate analysis explored housing experiences related to homelessness, housing stability, housing independence, and living situation during the transition to adulthood. Multivariate analysis was used to examine factors associated with particular housing patterns.

Results: Analysis revealed that housing experiences were similar for former foster youth and youth in the matched sample with some differences to youth in the general population. With regard to homelessness, former foster youth experienced higher rates than youth in the general population, but similar rates to comparison youth. Considering housing stability, the number of moves and the expectation to move within the next year was similar for youth in all three groups. Examining housing independence, experiences were similar across the three groups with regard to living on one's own, the year the youth first moved out, moving back in with parents or guardians, and rates of home ownership. Considering living situation, some differences were noted for former foster youth and youth in the general population, mainly with regard to cohabitation and living in a dormitory. Multivariate analysis suggests housing experiences were tied to income, education level, and other transition experiences rather than foster care history.

Conclusions and Implications: Study findings suggest some areas of promise for former foster youth, mainly their ability to secure stable, independent housing at similar rates and ages to other youth. While these findings suggest success, rates of homelessness are well-above youth in the general population during this transition period. Additionally, their high rates of cohabitation and low rates of dormitory living are likely tied to other transition outcomes around securing adult relationships and obtaining higher levels of education. These factors may set youth up for negative trajectories and have implications for policy and service delivery. Findings from this study are used to provide policy and practice recommendations with regard to housing and transition services for former foster youth.

Bibliography Citation
Berzin, Stephanie Cosner, Alison M. Rhodes and Marah A. Curtis. "Understanding the Housing Experience of Former Foster Youth During the Transition to Adulthood." Presented: Tampa FL, Society for Social Work and Research 15th Annual Conference, January 2011.