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Author: Boutwell, Brian B.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Barbaro, Nicole
Connolly, Eric J.
Sogge, Madi
Shackelford, Todd K.
Boutwell, Brian B.
The Effects of Spanking on Psychosocial Outcomes: Revisiting Genetic and Environmental Covariation
Journal of Experimental Criminology published online (18 April 2022): DOI: 10.1007/s11292-021-09496-5.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11292-021-09496-5
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Depression (see also CESD); Punishment, Corporal; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives: The current research aimed to provide probable ranges of estimates of the degree to which genetic and nonshared environmental covariation could explain the reported phenotypic effects in the Gershoff and Grogan-Kaylor (Gershoff and Grogan-Kaylor, Family Relations 65:490-501, 2016a, Gershoff and Grogan-Kaylor, Journal of Family Psychology 30:453, 2016b) meta-analysis of spanking.

Participants and setting: The analytic sample for Study 1 was secured from the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (CNLSY) and consisted of 2868 respondents (siblings and half-siblings). The data for Study 2 were secured from the published literature.

Methods: Study 1 analyzed the data from the CNLSY using univariate ACE models and bivariate Cholesky decomposition models. Study 2 used simulation modeling to provide a summative evaluation of the psychosocial effects of spanking with regard to genetic and nonshared environmental covariation.

Results: Study 1 replicated previous work showing that associations between spanking and outcomes of delinquency, depression, and alcohol use were explained by moderate-to-large degrees of genetic covariation and small-to-moderate degrees of nonshared environmental covariation. Simulation estimates from Study 2 suggest that genetic covariation accounts for a substantial amount of the phenotypic effect between spanking and psychosocial outcomes (≈60–80%), with the remainder attributable to nonshared environmental covariation (≈0–40%).

Bibliography Citation
Barbaro, Nicole, Eric J. Connolly, Madi Sogge, Todd K. Shackelford and Brian B. Boutwell. "The Effects of Spanking on Psychosocial Outcomes: Revisiting Genetic and Environmental Covariation." Journal of Experimental Criminology published online (18 April 2022): DOI: 10.1007/s11292-021-09496-5.
2. Boutwell, Brian B.
Connolly, Eric J.
Barbaro, Nicole
Shackelford, Todd K.
Petkovsek, Melissa
Beaver, Kevin M.
On the Genetic and Environmental Reasons Why Intelligence Correlates with Criminal Victimization
Intelligence 62 (May 2017): 155-166.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289617300077
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Bullying/Victimization; Family Influences; Intelligence; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Siblings

Researchers have expended considerable effort to understand the causes and correlates of criminal victimization. More recently, scholars have focused on identifying individual-level traits that increase the odds of victimization. Generally absent from this line of research, however, is examining the extent to which previously unmeasured genetic and environmental influences contribute to the covariation between victimization and individual-level risk factors. The current study aims to replicate and extend prior research by examining the contribution of genetic and environmental influences on the association between intelligence and victimization by analyzing twin and sibling data from two nationally representative samples of American youth. Quantitative genetic analyses indicate that common additive genetic factors, as well as non-shared environmental factors, explained the phenotypic association between intelligence and victimization. Finally, our results revealed that after correcting for possible familial confounding, the effect of intelligence on victimization experiences remained statistically significant. The findings of the current study replicate and extend prior research on the phenotypic association between indicators of general intelligence and the experience of victimization.
Bibliography Citation
Boutwell, Brian B., Eric J. Connolly, Nicole Barbaro, Todd K. Shackelford, Melissa Petkovsek and Kevin M. Beaver. "On the Genetic and Environmental Reasons Why Intelligence Correlates with Criminal Victimization." Intelligence 62 (May 2017): 155-166.
3. Kavish, Nicholas
Connolly, Eric J.
Boutwell, Brian B.
Genetic and Environmental Contributions to the Association between Violent Victimization and Major Depressive Disorder
Personality and Individual Differences 140 (1 April 2019): 103-110.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886918302885
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Crime; Depression (see also CESD); Genetics; Siblings

Research suggests victims of violent crime are more likely to suffer from major depressive disorder (MDD) compared to non-victims. Less research has utilized longitudinal data to evaluate the directionality of this relationship or examined the genetic and environmental contributions to this association across the life course. The current study evaluated 473 full-sibling pairs and 209 half-sibling pairs (N = 1364) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (Mage = 20.14, SD = 3.94). Cross-lagged models were used to examine the directionality of effects between violent victimization and MDD over time. Biometric liability models were used to examine genetic and environmental influences on single and chronic violent victimization and MDD. Violent victimization was associated with increases in MDD during late adolescence, but MDD was more associated with increased risk for violent victimization across young adulthood. Biometric analysis indicated that 20% and 30% of the association between MDD and single and chronic victimization, respectively, was accounted for by common genetic influences. Results from the current study suggest individuals who exhibit symptoms of MDD may be at higher risk for chronic victimization rather than developing MDD as a result of victimization.
Bibliography Citation
Kavish, Nicholas, Eric J. Connolly and Brian B. Boutwell. "Genetic and Environmental Contributions to the Association between Violent Victimization and Major Depressive Disorder." Personality and Individual Differences 140 (1 April 2019): 103-110.