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Author: Bowles, Samuel
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Arrow, Kenneth
Bowles, Samuel
Durlauf, Steven
Meritocracy and Economic Inequality
Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB); Educational Returns; Family Background; Family Studies; I.Q.; Intelligence; Occupational Choice; Racial Studies; Wage Differentials; Wage Rates

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Merit and justice / Amartya Sen -- Equality of opportunity / John E. Roemer -- IQ trends over time: intelligence, race, and meritocracy / James R. Flynn -- Genes, culture, and inequality / Marcus W. Feldman, Sarah P. Otto, and Freddy B. Christiansen -- Schooling, intelligence, and income in America / Orley Ashenfelter and Cecilia Rouse -- Does schooling raise earnings by making people smarter? / Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis -- A reanalysis of The Bell curve: intelligence, family background, and schooling / Sanders Korenman and Christopher Winship -- Occupational status, education, and social mobility in the meritocracy / Robert M. Hauser, ... [et al.] -- Understanding the role of cognitive ability in accounting for the recent rise in the economic return to education / John Cawley, ... [et al.] -- Inequality and race: models and policy / Shelly J. Lundberg and Richrd Startz -- Conceptual problems in the enforcement of anti-discrimination laws / Glenn Loury -- Meritocracy, redistribution, and the size of the pie / Roland B
Bibliography Citation
Arrow, Kenneth, Samuel Bowles and Steven Durlauf. Meritocracy and Economic Inequality. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000..
2. Bowles, Samuel
Gintis, Herbert
Osborne Groves, Melissa
Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success
New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton University Press, 2005
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; Earnings; Fathers and Sons; Human Capital; I.Q.; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Pairs (also see Siblings); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Contents:
Chapter 1: The apple does not fall far from the tree / Greg Duncan ... [et al.]
Chapter 2: The apple falls even closer to the tree than we thought : new and revised estimates of the intergenerational inheritance of earnings / Bhashkar Mazunder
Chapter 3: The changing effect of family background on the incomes of American adults / David J. Harding ... [et al.]
Chapter 4: Influences of nature and nurture on earnings variation : a report on a study of various sibling types in Sweden / Anders Björklund, Markus Jäntti, Gary Solon
Chapter 5: Rags, riches, and race : the intergenerational economic mobility of black and white families in the United States / Tom Hertz
Chapter 6: Resemblance in personality and attitudes between parents and their children : genetic and environmental contributions / John C. Loehlin
Chapter 7: Personality and the intergenerational transmission of economic status / Melissa Osborne Groves
Chapter 8: Son preference, marriage, and intergenerational transfer in rural China / Marcus W. Feldman ... [et al.]
Chapter 9: Justice, luck, and the family : the intergenerational transmission of economic advantage from a normative perspective / Adam Swift.

Chapter 7 … provides a micro data analysis of the role of personality in the intergenerational transmission of earnings. The author uses data on matched father-son pairs from the mature and young male cohorts of the National Longitudinal Surveys. The statistical models link son's and father's permanent income, while also controlling for human capital variables, IQ, and the Rotter score, a commonly used indicator of personality. The results show that a substantial share of the intergenerational transmission of earnings is attributable to the transmission of personality traits: 11 percent of the father-son correlation in earnings is explained by the transmission of personality.

Bibliography Citation
Bowles, Samuel, Herbert Gintis and Melissa Osborne Groves. Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation and Princeton University Press, 2005.
3. Bowles, Samuel
Gintis, Herbert
Osborne Groves, Melissa
Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success
[Reprint]. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008.
Also: http://press.princeton.edu/TOCs/c7838.html
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Keyword(s): Data Quality/Consistency; Earnings; Fathers and Sons; Human Capital; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Economic; Pairs (also see Siblings); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Table of Contents
Introduction by Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Melissa Osborne Groves 1
Chapter One: The Apple Does Not Fall Far from the Tree by Greg Duncan, Ariel Kalil, Susan E. Mayer, Robin Tepper, and Monique R. Payne 23
Chapter Two: The Apple Falls Even Closer to the Tree than We Thought: New and Revised Estimates of the Intergenerational Inheritance of Earnings by Bhashkar Mazumder 80
Chapter Three: The Changing Effect of Family Background on the Incomes of American Adults by David J. Harding, Christopher Jencks, Leonard M. Lopoo, and Susan E. Mayer 100
Chapter Four: Influences of Nature and Nurture on Earnings Variation: A Report on a Study of Various Sibling Types in Sweden by Anders Björklund, Markus Jäntti, and Gary Solon 145
Chapter Five: Rags, Riches, and Race: The Intergenerational Economic Mobility of Black and White Families in the United States by Tom Hertz 165
Chapter Six: Resemblance in Personality and Attitudes between Parents and Their Children: Genetic and Environmental Contributions by John C. Loehlin 192
Chapter Seven: Personality and the Intergenerational Transmission of Economic Status by Melissa Osborne Groves 208
Chapter Eight: Son Preference, Marriage, and Intergenerational Transfer in Rural China by Marcus W. Feldman, Shuzhuo Li, Nan Li, Shripad Tuljapurkar, and Xiaoyi Jin 232
Chapter Nine: Justice, Luck, and the Family: The Intergenerational Transmission of Economic Advantage from a Normative Perspective by Adam Swift 256
References 277
Index 297
Bibliography Citation
Bowles, Samuel, Herbert Gintis and Melissa Osborne Groves. Unequal Chances: Family Background and Economic Success. [Reprint]. Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008..
4. Bowles, Samuel
Gintis, Herbert
Osborne, Melissa Anne
The Determinants of Earnings: A Behavioral Approach
Journal of Economic Literature 39,4 (December 2001): 1137-1176.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2698522
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Older Men, Young Women
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Earnings; Human Capital; Skills

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Enhancing individuals' capacity to succeed in the labor market is a major objective of both families and policy makers, one which in recent years has assumed special urgency with respect to those with low earnings. According to the canonical model, earnings are determined by human capital, which consists of capacities to contribute to production, generically called skills. Individuals possess a vector of these capabilities, "c," and sell these on the labor market at hourly prices "p," with hourly earnings "w = pc." But we know surprisingly little about what skills make up the vector of individual capabilities contributing to higher earnings, and as we will see, some common beliefs about the earnings-generation process receive little support from available data. However, recent developments in labor econometrics and the microeconomics of labor markets provide the basis for a reconsideration of the determinants of individual earnings. We here survey what is known about the determinants of individual earnings and, drawing on a number of recent contributions, propose a behavioral model that is capable of addressing the following puzzles in a parsimonious and non-ad hoc manner.
Bibliography Citation
Bowles, Samuel, Herbert Gintis and Melissa Anne Osborne. "The Determinants of Earnings: A Behavioral Approach." Journal of Economic Literature 39,4 (December 2001): 1137-1176.