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Author: Bratsberg, Bernt
Resulting in 9 citations.
1. Bjorklund, Anders
Bratsberg, Bernt
Eriksson, Tor
Jantti, Markus
Naylor, Robin
Raaum, Oddbjorn
Roed, Knut
Osterbacka, Eva
Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States: An Overview
Working Paper, Abo Akademi University, Abo, Finland, 2005.
Also: http://www.creato.no/espe_2004/sider/pdf/osterbacka.pdf
Cohort(s): Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: European Society for Population Economics (ESPE)
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Denmark, Danish; Fathers and Children; Fathers and Sons; Finland, Finnish; Gender Differences; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; Mobility, Economic; Norway, Norwegian; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Also: Presented: Bergen, Norway, European Society for Population Economics, June 2004.

The present paper examines the extent of intergenerational earnings mobility in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and the United States. We examine income mobility among pairs of fathers and sons as well as fathers and daughters using both mobility matrices and regression and correlation coefficients. Our results suggest that while all countries exhibit substantial income persistence across generations, especially in the tails of the distribution, there is greater persistence of rich rather than poor incomes among men, there is less income persistence in the Nordic countries and daughters are more mobile than men.

Bibliography Citation
Bjorklund, Anders, Bernt Bratsberg, Tor Eriksson, Markus Jantti, Robin Naylor, Oddbjorn Raaum, Knut Roed and Eva Osterbacka. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States: An Overview." Working Paper, Abo Akademi University, Abo, Finland, 2005.
2. Bratsberg, Bernt
Ragan, James F. Jr.
Have Unions Impeded Growing Wage Dispersion Among Young Workers?
Journal of Labor Research 18,4 (December 1997): 593-612.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0l431u0073189177/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: John M. Olin Institute at George Mason University
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Skills; Unions; Wage Equations; Wage Gap; Wages, Young Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Wage inequality is examined for young males over the period 1980-1993. While wage inequality increased substantially for nonunion workers over this period, wage inequality increased only modestly for union workers. In part, this difference results from divergent trends in skill prices -returns to skill rose in the nonunion sector but contracted slightly in the union sector. In particular, returns to education increased sharply in the nonunion sector while remaining stagnant in the union sector. At least for young workers, these findings suggest that unions have been largely successful in resisting market pressures for greater wage inequality. We also uncover evidence suggesting that, as relative returns to education decline in the union sector, highly educated young workers become less likely to choose union employment.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and James F. Jr. Ragan. "Have Unions Impeded Growing Wage Dispersion Among Young Workers?" Journal of Labor Research 18,4 (December 1997): 593-612.
3. Bratsberg, Bernt
Ragan, James F. Jr.
The Impact of Host-Country Schooling on Earnings: A Study of Male Immigrants in the United States
Journal of Human Resources 37,1 (Winter 2002): 63-105.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3069604
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Immigrants; Language Aptitude; Male Sample; Schooling; Wages

Immigrants in the United States who acquire U.S. schooling earn higher wages than other immigrants. Using data from the U.S. censuses and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we show that this wage advantage results from both greater educational attainment and higher returns to education. The higher returns are not the consequence of ability bias or greater English proficiency of those who acquire U.S. schooling. Returns to years of non-U.S. education are higher for immigrants who complete their schooling in the United States, consistent with the view that U.S. schooling upgrades or certifies education received in the source country. For those without U.S. schooling, returns are higher for immigrants from highly developed countries and countries for which English is an official language.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and James F. Jr. Ragan. "The Impact of Host-Country Schooling on Earnings: A Study of Male Immigrants in the United States." Journal of Human Resources 37,1 (Winter 2002): 63-105.
4. Bratsberg, Bernt
Ragan, James F. Jr.
Nasir, Zafar Mueen
The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants
Journal of Labor Economics 20,3 (July 2002).
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/339616
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Census of Population; Human Capital; Immigrants; Labor Force Participation; Unions; Wage Growth; Work History

For young male immigrants, naturalization facilitates assimilation into the U.S. labor market. Following naturalization, immigrants gain access to public-sector, white-collar, and union jobs, and wage growth accelerates. These findings are consistent with the proposition that naturalization fosters labor market success of immigrants by removing barriers to employment. Although the faster wage growth of immigrants who naturalize might alternatively be explained by greater human capital investment prior to naturalization, stemming from a long-term commitment to U.S. labor markets, there is no evidence that wage growth accelerates or that the distribution of jobs improves until after citizenship is attained. Finally, the gains from naturalization are greater for immigrants from less-developed countries and persist when we control for unobserved productivity characteristics of workers.

(See also, Nasir, Zaffar M. as alternative spelling for author's name.)

Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt, James F. Jr. Ragan and Zafar Mueen Nasir. "The Effect of Naturalization on Wage Growth: A Panel Study of Young Male Immigrants." Journal of Labor Economics 20,3 (July 2002).
5. Bratsberg, Bernt
Roed, Knut
Raaum, Oddbjorn
Naylor, Robin
Jantti, Markus
Eriksson, Tor
Osterbacka, Eva
Nonlinearities in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility: Consequences for Cross-Country Comparisons
Economic Journal 117,519 (March 2007), C72-C92.
Also: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-0297.2007.02036.x
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Royal Economic Society (RES)
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Denmark, Danish; Educational Attainment; Family Background; Fathers and Sons; Finland, Finnish; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Norway, Norwegian; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We show that the patterns of intergenerational earnings mobility in Denmark, Finland and Norway, unlike those for the US and the UK, are highly nonlinear. The Nordic relationship between log earnings of sons and fathers is flat in the lower segments of the fathers earnings distribution – sons growing up in the poorest households have the same adult earnings prospects as sons in moderately poor households – and is increasingly positive in middle and upper segments. This convex pattern contrasts sharply with our findings for the US and the UK, where the relationship is much closer to being linear. As a result, cross-country comparisons of intergenerational earnings elasticities may be misleading with respect to transmission mechanisms in the central parts of the earnings distribution and uninformative in the tails of the distribution.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt, Knut Roed, Oddbjorn Raaum, Robin Naylor, Markus Jantti, Tor Eriksson and Eva Osterbacka. "Nonlinearities in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility: Consequences for Cross-Country Comparisons ." Economic Journal 117,519 (March 2007), C72-C92.
6. Bratsberg, Bernt
Terrell, Dek
Experience, Tenure, and Wage Growth of Young Black and White Men
Journal of Human Resources 33,3 (Summer 1998): 658-682.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/146337
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): High School Completion/Graduates; Job Tenure; Racial Differences; Wage Growth; Work Experience

This paper studies the source of differences in wage growth between young black and white workers. Focusing on "terminal" high school graduates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we estimate the returns to on-the-job tenure and general labor market experience using ordinary least squares, Altonji and Shakotko, and Topel estimators. Results from all three estimators indicate that for black workers returns to general experience trail those for white workers, but that black workers earn equal if not higher returns to tenure than do white workers.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and Dek Terrell. "Experience, Tenure, and Wage Growth of Young Black and White Men." Journal of Human Resources 33,3 (Summer 1998): 658-682.
7. Bratsberg, Bernt
Turunen, Jarkko
Wage Curve Evidence from Panel Data
Economics Letters 51,3 (June 1996): 345-353.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/016517659600818X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Local Labor Market; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Regions; Wage Equations

We examine the US wage curve using longitudinal micro data. Results support the wage curve. but are sensitive to inclusion of regional and/or personal fixed effects. We find that hourly wages are less responsive to local unemployment than annual earnings.
Bibliography Citation
Bratsberg, Bernt and Jarkko Turunen. "Wage Curve Evidence from Panel Data." Economics Letters 51,3 (June 1996): 345-353.
8. Jantti, Markus
Bratsberg, Bernt
Roed, Knut
Raaum, Oddbjorn
Naylor, Robin
Osterbacka, Eva
Bjorklund, Anders
Eriksson, Tor
American Exceptionalism in a New Light: A Comparison of Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States
IZA Discussion Paper No. 1938, The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), January 2006.
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)
Keyword(s): Britain, British; Cross-national Analysis; Denmark, Danish; Educational Attainment; Family Background; Fathers and Sons; Finland, Finnish; Income Dynamics/Shocks; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; NCDS - National Child Development Study (British); Norway, Norwegian; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We develop methods and employ similar sample restrictions to analyze differences in intergenerational earnings mobility across the United States, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. We examine earnings mobility among pairs of fathers and sons as well as fathers and daughters using both mobility matrices and regression and correlation coefficients. Our results suggest that all countries exhibit substantial earnings persistence across generations, but with statistically significant differences across countries. Mobility is lower in the U.S. than in the U.K., where it is lower again compared to the Nordic countries. Persistence is greatest in the tails of the distributions and tends to be particularly high in the upper tails: though in the U.S. this is reversed with a particularly high likelihood that sons of the poorest fathers will remain in the lowest earnings quintile. This is a challenge to the popular notion of "American exceptionalism." The U.S. also differs from the Nordic countries in its very low likelihood that sons of the highest earners will show downward "long-distance" mobility into the lowest earnings quintile. In this, the U.K. is more similar to the U.S.
Bibliography Citation
Jantti, Markus, Bernt Bratsberg, Knut Roed, Oddbjorn Raaum, Robin Naylor, Eva Osterbacka, Anders Bjorklund and Tor Eriksson. "American Exceptionalism in a New Light: A Comparison of Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the Nordic Countries, the United Kingdom and the United States." IZA Discussion Paper No. 1938, The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), January 2006.
9. Ragan, James F. Jr.
Bratsberg, Bernt
Earnings Inequality Narrows for Young Workers Despite a Widening Wage Structure
The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 35,4 (Winter 1995): 387-395.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/1062976995900446
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Wage Equations; Wage Rates; Wages, Youth; Work Hours

Inequality of wage rates has widened in the United States. But in equality of earnings also depends on the distribution of hours worked. If the distribution of hours contracts sufficiently, earnings inequality may narrow despite a widening wage structure. The present study examines recent trends in inequality for young workers and. consistent with the preceding scenario, finds that rising inequality of wage rates has been overwhelmed by declining inequality of hours worked. As a consequence, earnings inequality of young workers declined during the 1980s.
Bibliography Citation
Ragan, James F. Jr. and Bernt Bratsberg. "Earnings Inequality Narrows for Young Workers Despite a Widening Wage Structure." The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 35,4 (Winter 1995): 387-395.