Search Results

Author: Bureau of Labor Statistics
Resulting in 22 citations.
1. Bureau of Labor Statistics
25 Years of the National Longitudinal Survey - Youth Cohort
Monthly Labor Review [Special Issue] 128,2 (February 2005): . Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2005.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2005/02/contents.htm
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLS General, NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children; Longitudinal Data Sets; Longitudinal Surveys

See also the following articles in this bibliography:
Table of Contents:
Charles Pierret: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth: 1979 cohort at 25
James R. Walker: Antecedents and predecessors of NLSY79: paving the course
Kenneth I. Wolpin: Education data in the NLSY79: a premiere research tool
Julie A. Yates: The transition from school to work: education and work experiences
Audrey Light: Job mobility and wage growth: evidence from the NLSY79
Robert W. Fairlie: Self-employment, entrepreneurship, and the nlsy79
Harley J. Frazis and James R. Spletzer: Worker training: what we've learned from the nlsy79
Lawrence L. Wu and Jui-Chung Allen Li: Children of the NLSY79: a unique data resource
Randall J. Olsen: The problem of respondent attrition: survey methodology is key
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "25 Years of the National Longitudinal Survey - Youth Cohort." Monthly Labor Review [Special Issue] 128,2 (February 2005): . Washington, DC: Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2005.
2. Bureau of Labor Statistics
America's Young Adults at 29: Labor Market Activity, Education and Partner Status: Results from a Longitudinal Survey
News Release, USDL-16-0700. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, April 8, 2016.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/nlsyth.nr0.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Educational Attainment; Labor Force Participation; Marital Status

Young adults born in the early 1980s held an average of 7.2 jobs from age 18 through age 28, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Individuals held more jobs at younger ages, and the number of jobs held declined as individuals aged. Young adults held an average of 3.9 jobs from ages 18 to 21 compared with 2.5 jobs from ages 25 to 28. From ages 18 to 28, women with more education held more jobs than women with less education. Regardless of education, men held a similar number of jobs.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "America's Young Adults at 29: Labor Market Activity, Education and Partner Status: Results from a Longitudinal Survey." News Release, USDL-16-0700. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, April 8, 2016.
3. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Changes in Wages and Benefits Among Young Adults
Work and Family, Report 849. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, July 1993.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk011.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Men, Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Benefits; Education; Educational Attainment; Gender Differences; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Retirement; Training; Wage Differentials; Wage Rates; Wages, Youth

This issue of Work and Family examines recent changes in the structure of wages and in employer-provided benefits made available to young workers. Also, changes in the wage structure and in benefits are compared by educational level. For young workers in their first 5 years out of school, it is found that average wage rates for men fell substantially between the 1970's and 1980's, whereas there was little overall change in average wage rates for women workers. This decline in wages was particularly severe for men with 12 years of education or less. In addition, while there was little change in the availability of health and retirement benefits for young workers between the 1970's and 1991, there was an increase in available maternity leave, training, and profit-sharing opportunities. For most types of benefits examined here, there is a positive association between the availability of benefits and level of education.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Changes in Wages and Benefits Among Young Adults." Work and Family, Report 849. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, July 1993.
4. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Child-Care Arrangements of Young Working Mothers
Work and Family, Report 820. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk007.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Child Care; Child Support; Dual-Career Families; Earnings; Family Income; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Shift Workers; Work Hours

Uses the 1988 data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on the income of men, aged 23 to 31, who are noncustodial fathers. Based on 872 men who are non custodial fathers examines the father's income needed to pay the hypothetical minimum assured benefit for the children with whom they do not live. Sixty-five percent of young noncustodial fathers could pay the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit with less than two-fifths of their gross income. For example, 35 percent could pay at least the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit using less than one-fifth of their income and 30 percent would use between one-fifth and two-fifths. At the other end of the income range, however, 9 percent have no income; to pay the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit, 14 percent would pay four-fifths or more of their income and 12 percent would use between two-fifths and four-fifths of their income. Also estimated the payments these same fathers would be required to make under a percentage-of-income guideline, typical of state child support guidelines, and then compared these payments with the hypothetical minimum assured benefit. We found that 34 percent of the fathers would be required to pay the entire hypothetical minimum assured benefit; 9 percent would pay nothing because they have no income; and 57 percent would be required to pay part of the minimum assured benefit. 29 percent would be exempt from making child support payments; and 37 percent would be required to pay a part of the minimum assured benefit. In particular, 6 percent of young noncustodial fathers would have their payments lowered because full payment would cause them to live in poverty. Policy makers can use these data in considering how much they want to require noncustodial fathers to pay for the support of their children under a child support assurance system.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Child-Care Arrangements of Young Working Mothers." Work and Family, Report 820. Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, 1992.
5. Bureau of Labor Statistics
College Attendance and Completion Higher among Millennials than Youngest Baby Boomers
TED: The Economics Daily, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, August 1, 2019.
Also: https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2019/college-attendance-and-completion-higher-among-millennials-than-youngest-baby-boomers.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Education; Family Income; High School Completion/Graduates; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT

College attendance among people who graduated high school or earned a GED before age 21 rose dramatically for two generations of Americans born 20 years apart. About 44 percent of high school completers born between 1960 and 1964 attended a 2-year or 4-year college. That compares with 73 percent of high school completers born between 1980 and 1984. College attendance increased for both men and women and across scores on achievement tests and levels of family income. There were larger gains in college attendance among people not in the top quartile for test scores and not in the top quartile for family income.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "College Attendance and Completion Higher among Millennials than Youngest Baby Boomers." TED: The Economics Daily, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, August 1, 2019.
6. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Education and Training of American Workers
Working Paper, Prepared for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development National Experts Group on Training Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Wasington DC, 1990
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Bureau of Labor Statistics; Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Earnings; Education; Gender Differences; Longitudinal Surveys; NLS Description; Racial Differences; Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP); Training; Vocational Education

This paper describes briefly the following surveys that have been conducted to determine the amount and thrust of employee training in the United States: (1) household surveys including the Current Population Survey, the NLS, the Survey of Income and Program Participation, and the University of Michigan Time Use study; and employer surveys, including the 1974 survey by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Institute of Education and National Center for Research in Vocational Education surveys, the Bureau of Labor Statistics Employee Benefit Survey, state and local surveys, the Battelle Human Affairs Research Center survey, and apprenticeship surveys. The paper also describes ways to determine costs and effects of training. The surveys provide the following information: (1) the likelihood of training declines with age, but increases with education; (2) men and whites are more likely to receive training than women and blacks; (3) the likelihood of training increases with firm size; (4) most training is informal; and (5) training increases future earnings of workers, but which kinds of training do so and how well training pays is uncertain. Information not provided by the surveys, however, includes the definition of training, the total amount of training received by workers, the cost of training, and changes in training over time. The report proposes that these questions be answered by a multistage survey. [ERIC ED330892]
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Education and Training of American Workers." Working Paper, Prepared for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development National Experts Group on Training Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Wasington DC, 1990.
7. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Jobs Held and Weeks Worked by Young Adults
Work and Family, Report 827. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, August 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk005.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; Event History; Job Patterns; Job Tenure; Layoffs; Work History

This report presents information on the cumulative number of jobs and weeks of work for young workers using data from the Youth cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS). These data describe a sample of young men and women who were between the ages of 14 and 22 in 1979 and who have been interviewed annually since that year. A key feature of this survey is that it collects information in an event history format, in which dates are collected for the beginning and ending of important events. In the case of work, the starting date for every job is recorded, and if a person stops work far that employer, the ending date is recorded as well. For multiple jobholders, information is gathered for each job, with starting and ending dates. Periods of non work within a job, such as periods on layoff, or when ill, pregnant, and so forth are also recorded. By recording the dates of all jobs and all periods of non work, the survey provides a nearly complete and continuous employment history for each individual in the sample. This discussion of young workers gives the average number of jobs held and average weeks of work since age 18. The sample is restricted to those who were age 18 or younger as of January 1, 1978. The time frame analyzed runs from January 1, 1978 to January 1, 1990. Consequently, averages are computed for individuals for ages 18 through 29.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Jobs Held and Weeks Worked by Young Adults. Work and Family, Report 827. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, August 1992..
8. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Labor Market Experiences and More: Studying Men, Women, and Children Since 1966, National Longitudinal Surveys
GPO Item No: 0769. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 2000
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Market Surveys; Longitudinal Surveys

Government Document, Sudoc Number: GovDoc: L 2.2:EX 7/2000; GPO Item No: 0769.

SUBJECTS: 1. National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience (U.S.) 2. Labor market--United States -Longitudinal studies.

Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Labor Market Experiences and More: Studying Men, Women, and Children Since 1966, National Longitudinal Surveys. GPO Item No: 0769. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, April 2000.
9. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Labor Month in Review
Monthly Labor Review 116,6 (June 1993): 2
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Marital Status

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women were used to track the experiences of women as they aged from 40 to 49 during the 1967-1986 period.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Labor Month in Review." Monthly Labor Review 116,6 (June 1993): 2.
10. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Learning to Do the Job
Work and Family, Report 903. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, March 1996.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk001.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Aptitude; Educational Attainment; Job Analysis; Job Knowledge; Job Skills; Skilled Workers; Skills; Training, Employee

This issue of Work and Family examines the acquisition of skills by young adults at the start of a job and as a response to changes at the workplace. The analysis is based primarily on a set of questions asked of 28- to 30 year-old workers in 1993. Significant findings are included...Investments in job training are commonly thought to increase workers' productivity and wages. Yet research into the effects of training, particularly training provided by employers, has been limited by a lack of comprehensive and representative data on training investments. While there is a growing set of data which contains information concerning formal employer-provided training, much less is known about more informal ways in which workers learn new tasks...In 1993, respondents for the first time were asked about more informal forms of on-the-job learning, such as receiving instruction from supervisors or observing coworkers. In the 1993 survey, working respondents were asked about two forms of learning: the acquisition of skills when they began their job and learning new tasks related to changes at work within the prior 12 months. This report presents tabulations generated from the responses to these two sets of questions.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Learning to Do the Job. Work and Family, Report 903. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, March 1996..
11. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Never Too Old To Learn. Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys
Work and Family, Report 856. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 1993.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk010.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): College Education; Education; Educational Attainment; Job Training; Training; Unemployment Rate, Regional; Women

Data from the Mature Women's cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys were used in an analysis of the acquisition of education and training by women at later ages over the 1979-89 period. These data described a sample of women who were between the ages of 30 and 45 in 1967 and who had been interviewed regularly at later intervals. Between the years of 1979 and 1989, the survey collected information about the occurrence and duration of all education and training programs. This analysis examined the extent of participation in education and training programs among this group of women from 1979-1989, a time in which they aged from 42-57 to 52-67. The time spent in education and training, as measured by total hours involved in these programs, was also analyzed. In addition, reasons why these women participated in programs outside of college education and company training over the 1984-89 period were addressed. Over 40 percent of women were found to have participated in some education or training program during the 11-year period. The primary forms of instruction were company training and college courses. White women more likely had some education or training than other women, but among program participants, other women spent more time in these programs than white women. Evidence on instructional programs other than company training and college education indicated that over one-third of the women participated in these programs for job-related reasons. (YLB)
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Never Too Old To Learn. Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys. Work and Family, Report 856. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 1993..
12. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Over Two Decades: Results from a Longitudinal Survey Summary
News, USDL 00-119. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 2000.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlsn0004.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Earnings; Job Rewards; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Surveys; NLS Description; Unemployment; Wage Growth

The average person in the U.S. holds 9.2 jobs from age 18 to age 34, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department ofLabor. More than half of these jobs were held between the ages of 18 and 24. These findings are from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79), a survey of 9,964 young men and women who were born between 1957 and 1964. These respondents were 14 to 22 years of age when first interviewed in 1979 and 33 to 41 when interviewed most recently in 1998. The survey spans nearly two decades and provides information on work and nonwork experiences, training, schooling, income and assets, health conditions, and other characteristics. The information provided by respondents, who were interviewed annually from 1979 to 1994 and biennially since 1994, can be considered representative of all men and women born in the late 1950s and early 1960s and living in the United States in 1978. Also: http://stats.bls.gov/news.release/nlsoy.nr0.htm
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Number of Jobs Held, Labor Market Activity, and Earnings Growth Over Two Decades: Results from a Longitudinal Survey Summary. News, USDL 00-119. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 2000..
13. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Part-Time Employment Transitions Among Young Women
Work and Family, Report 824. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, May 1992
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; Part-Time Work; Women

This report takes a look at transitions of women into and out of part-time work by examining the same women over time, using data from the Young Women's cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS). The NLS provide information on a sample of women who were between the ages of 14 and 24 in 1968 and have been interviewed regularly since then. Two groups of women are studied: 1) those who were age 29 to 33 in 1978, and 2) those who were 29 to 33 in 1983. The labor force transitions of the two groups are compared over a 5-year period. Over the past 20 years, the labor force participation rate of women has increased dramatically. In 1970, 41.6 percent of women over age 16 participated in the labor force. By 1990, this rate increased to 57.5 percent. During this same period the growth of the service sector has expanded part-time employment because most part-time workers are employed in the services and retail trade industries. Part-time employment offers a variety of advantages and disadvantages to workers. Part-time work may provide the flexibility some workers desire to maintain family, personal, and employment responsibilities simultaneously. For persons who are entering or reentering the labor market after a prolonged absence, part-time employment may also serve to ease the transition into full-time employment. Part-time work, however, rarely provides the job security, promotion potential, or other nonmonetary benefits of full-time employment. As a result, part-time work is sometimes thought both to create and to limit opportunities. In 1988, an average of 13.3 million women worked part time, accounting for about two-thirds of all persons on such schedules. Women in the prime working ages, 25 to 54, were five times more likely than their male counterparts to work part time. These women accounted for nearly 40 percent of part-time employment. The substantial employment of women in part-time jobs makes any study of part-time work especially relevant to women.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Part-Time Employment Transitions Among Young Women. Work and Family, Report 824. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, May 1992.
14. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Promotions Among Women
Work and Family, Report 868. Washington DC: US. Department of Labor, March 1994.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk008.pdf
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Occupational Attainment; Occupational Status; Private Sector; Working Conditions

For most workers, the conditions of employment such as wages, benefits, and work environment are extremely important aspects of a job. Also of importance is an individual's rank or position within an organization. In many firms there exists a well-established job hierarchy in which advancement takes the form of promotions to higher level jobs, which is often considered part of the "structure" of an organization. Past research into the causes and consequences of promotions has focused primarily on federal workers, lawyers, and academics examining gender differentials in promotion within these sectors. However, little is known about the internal labor market, promotion activity, and the consequences of promotion among groups of private sector workers. This report uses data from the Young Women's cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys to examine how the conditions of employment such as wages, benefits, and work environment affect a woman's rank or position within an organization. In 1991, when the women were age 37 to 48, the survey asked questions to working women about whether a promotion was received at their current or last job and about certain characteristics of the promotion, such as whether the promotion involved more pay, more challenging work, more authority over others, or more responsibility.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Promotions Among Women. Work and Family, Report 868. Washington DC: US. Department of Labor, March 1994..
15. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Training
Monthly Labor Review 116,4 (April 1993): 2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Hispanics; Racial Differences

According to data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, approximately 20 percent of individuals who were aged 25 to 33 in 1990 received employer-provided training between 1986 and 1990. Much of the disparity in training between men and women--22.3 percent of the men received training as compared to 18.4 percent of the women--originates from differences in the number of weeks worked by the 2 groups; among employees who had worked 200 weeks or more, the probability of women receiving training was similar to that of men. Further analysis indicates that, on average, training lasted twice as long for men as for women and lasted longer for blacks than for whites and Hispanics. To a great extent, workers who were more educated were more likely to receive training.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Training." Monthly Labor Review 116,4 (April 1993): 2.
16. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Turning Thirty--Job Mobility and Labor Market Attachment
Work and Family, Report 862. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, December 1993.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk009.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; High School Dropouts; Job Tenure; Mobility, Labor Market; Racial Differences; Unemployment; Work Experience

This issue of Work and Family analyzes the labor market experience of individuals between their 18th and 30th birthdays. Some of the more significant findings include: Between the ages of 18 and 30, a typical individual has held 7.5 jobs and has 8.6 years of work experience. This suggests that workers between these ages experience 3.4 years of joblessness. On their 30th birthday, over 40 percent of workers have held their current job for 2 years or less, and about a quarter have been at their job more than 6 years. However, only 15 percent of individuals have spent 2 years or less in the longest job held between age 18 and 30, and about 30 percent have spent more than 6 years in the longest job. The average time spent at the longest job held between age 18 and age 30 is 5 years. Blacks and female high school dropouts tend to have the least work experience and the least job tenure by age 30.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Turning Thirty--Job Mobility and Labor Market Attachment. Work and Family, Report 862. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, December 1993..
17. Bureau of Labor Statistics
What Researchers Have Learned from the National Longitudinal Surveys About Youth Unemployment
Report No 828. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, August 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlssp002.pdf
Cohort(s): NLS General
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Job Requirements; Longitudinal Surveys; Minorities, Youth; Unemployment; Unemployment Duration; Unemployment, Youth

Unemployment rates of youth typically exceed those of other workers. This report summarizes some of the research that uses the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience (NLS), with special reference to the employment problems of minority and disadvantaged youth. These surveys are a collection of five surveys: Young Men who were 14-24 in 1966, Older Men who were 45-59 in 1966, Mature Women who were 30-44 in 1967, Young Women who were 14-24 in 1968, and Youth who were 14-21 in 1979, which includes both sexes. Because of the large samples of youth and because NLS respondents have been surveyed once every year or two over an extended period, these data are well-suited to examining the long-run consequences of youth labor market experiences. In particular, the 1979 NLS Youth Cohort (NLSY) contains weekly work histories detailing each respondent's labor force status, hours worked, and employment at more than one job, permitting analyses that are not possible with other data series. The sections of this report give an overview of the general characteristics of unemployed youths; discuss issues relating to the duration and incidence of joblessness among youth; survey the literature on the consequences of youth joblessness; discuss longer term consequences of youth unemployment and job search strategies of the young. a brief conclusion is provided that summarizes: NLS research has shown that blacks and whites appear to search for jobs in similar ways, both with regard to the search methods used and with regards to reservation wages for accepting a job offer. However, whites have more success in generating offers. This review has attempted to show the contribution that research using the NLS has made in understanding the problem of youth unemployment.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. What Researchers Have Learned from the National Longitudinal Surveys About Youth Unemployment. Report No 828. Washington, DC: US Department of Labor, August 1992..
18. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Women in Their Forties
Work and Family, Report 843. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 1993.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk002.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Education; Labor Force Participation; Women

This issue of Work and Family examines the labor market and marital status experiences of women in their forties using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women. These data track the experiences of women as they aged from 40 to 49 during the 1967-86 time period. Over 85 percent of these women worked at some time in their forties. On average, women worked 289 weeks, or about 58 percent of weeks worked by those who work a full-year each year during their forties over this time period. There are significant differences between women in labor force attachment and marital status transitions by race and education. In particular, among women in their forties, high school dropouts worked substantially fewer weeks, and were less likely to be in the labor force at both age 40 and age 49. They were also less likely to be married at both age 40 and age 49 than other women.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Women in Their Forties. Work and Family, Report 843. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 1993..
19. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Work and Family: Employer-Provided Training Among Young Adults
Report 838. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, February 1993.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/nls/nlswk003.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Apprenticeships; Training; Training, Occupational; Vocational Rehabilitation; Vocational Training

This report presents information on employer-provided training using data from the Youth cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS). These data describe a sample of young men and women who were between the ages of 14 and 22 in 1979 and who have been interviewed annually since that year. This survey contains some of the most comprehensive data currently available on training among young adults. Between the years of 1979 and 1986, the survey collected information about the occurrence and duration of all government-sponsored training programs and all privately supported training that lasted at least 4 weeks. In subsequent years, the training questions in the survey changed in order to ask respondents about all types of training (up to four programs) since the last interview, regardless of duration. Potential sources of training include business schools, apprenticeships, vocational and technical institutes, correspondence courses, company training, seminars outside of work, and vocational rehabilitation centers. These sources of training exclude any training received through formal schooling. It is important to emphasize that the measures of training do not capture informal training. Hence, any learning that occurs through methods such as observing coworkers, learning by doing, or speaking with supervisors is not measured here.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Work and Family: Employer-Provided Training Among Young Adults." Report 838. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, February 1993.
20. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Work and Family: Jobs Held and Weeks Worked by Young Adults
Report 827, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Burea of Labor Statistics, August 1992.
Also: http://www.bls.gov/nls/nlswk005.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Employment; Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Racial Differences; Work Histories

This issue of Work and Family examines the employment histories of young persons. It draws upon data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth which provides a nearly complete work history on all jobs held and weeks worked over a 12-year period, 1978 to 1990. By age 29, a typical young worker has held 7.6 jobs and worked 434 weeks since age 18, an average of 36.2 weeks per year. There are significant differences in the number of jobs held and weeks worked by sex and race.
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Work and Family: Jobs Held and Weeks Worked by Young Adults. Report 827, Washington DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Burea of Labor Statistics, August 1992..
21. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Work Patterns of Women Near Retirement
Work and Family, Report 830. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 1992.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/pdf/nlswk004.pdf
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Labor Force Participation; Retirement; Women; Work Experience

This report examines the labor market activity of older married women using data from the Mature Women's cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS). The survey provides the first adequate data for analyzing women's retirement behavior. The data provide information on a sample of women who were between the ages of 30 and 45 in 1967 and have been interviewed regularly since then. The analysis focuses on the years 1967-89, a period in which the age range of these women changed from 39-54 to 52-67. This time span and these age ranges provide an opportunity to capture the transition from work to retirement among women. Interviews were not conducted and data, therefore, are not available for the years 1978, 1980, 1983, 1985, and 1987. Respondents who did not work at all between 1976 and 1989 are excluded from the analysis, so that only the retirement decisions of women with some work experience over this period are considered. Two questions concerning the work patterns of these women as they approach retirement are addressed. First, are there significant differences in the work trends of older married women and older single women? Second, what is the relationship between the labor market activity of wives and husbands in their later years?
Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Work Patterns of Women Near Retirement. Work and Family, Report 830. Washington DC: US Department of Labor, 1992..
22. Bureau of Labor Statistics
Youth Employment
Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 3-67.
Also: http://stats.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2001/08/contents.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Education; Educational Returns; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences; Teenagers; Youth Problems

Examines labor market experiences of teenagers aged 12-16; based on in-person interviews, Jan. 1997, as part of the US Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97); 6 articles.

Participation in school-to-work programs; profile of work activity; initiation into the labor market; relationship between work, education, and labor market outcomes; and differences among racial groups.

Bibliography Citation
Bureau of Labor Statistics. "Youth Employment ." Monthly Labor Review 124,8 (August 2001): 3-67.