Search Results

Author: Chao, Shih-Yi
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Chao, Shih-Yi
Work Conditions and Marriage Dissolution
Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Marital Dissolution; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The new economy in the United State influences deeply on employment, marriage and family. Although previous research paid attention upon the relationship between work and marital dissolution, the mechanisms are still unclear. The study uses 1979-2010 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, which is national representative dataset, and follows the lives of American youth born between 1957 and 1964. The study employ demands-resources (JD-R) model to specify the mechanisms of working conditions, as well as consider both individual-level and contextual-level working conditions to see the impacts of specific dimensions of work on marriage dissolution, and disentangle the black box regarding mechanisms of education disparity in marital quality and stability. The preliminary descriptive result shows that people who stay in marriage have less number of job, and have better work conditions, such as paid vacation, paid sick day, parental leave, child care provided by companies, flexible schedule, health insurance, and job satisfaction.
Bibliography Citation
Chao, Shih-Yi. "Work Conditions and Marriage Dissolution." Presented: San Diego CA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April-May 2015.
2. Chao, Shih-Yi
Working Conditions and Marital Dissolution
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Divorce; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Marital Dissolution; Work Hours; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The vast demographic changes in families and workplace in the U.S. accompany with increasing demands of work and family involvement. Understanding the relationship between work and family can reveal how the new economy competes and negotiates with family, and what people pay to sustain the system. Applying JD-R model to NLSY79 with discrete-time hazard model, this study discusses how specific dimensions of working conditions influence the risk of divorce. The results show a full time job lower men's divorce risk they encounter. In contrast, longer working hours influence women's marital stability. Women who work at rotated shift suffer from higher risk of divorce than those at fixed shift. Personal income has no significant influence on men’s divorce risk, while women's personal income is positively related to the risk of divorce. In addition, fringe benefits cannot effectively predict the risk of divorce for men, whereas paid sick days reduce women's divorce risk, and health insurance facilitates women's willing to get divorced. In summary, the influence of working conditions on divorce depends on the image of conventional gender division of labor in household. Although women's employment keep going up, and gender equality spread widely, conventional breadwinner-homemaker family seems not be challenged for couples of NLSY79 cohort, as well as women’s disadvantages in the labor market, which forces women to stay in marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Chao, Shih-Yi. "Working Conditions and Marital Dissolution." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
3. Smith, Chelsea
Crosnoe, Robert
Chao, Shih-Yi
Family Background and Contemporary Changes in Young Adults' School-Work Transitions and Family Formation in the United States
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 46,A (December 2016): 3-10.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0276562416300099
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Family Background; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Labor Force Participation; Marriage; Parenthood; Transition, Adulthood; Transition, School to Work

The oft-discussed lengthening of the transition into adulthood is unlikely uniform across diverse segments of the population. This study followed youth in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and 1997 cohorts (n = 12,686 and 8,984, respectively) from 16 to 32 years old to investigate this trend in the United States, examining cross-cohort changes in transitions with a focus on differences by family background. Logistic regressions revealed that young adults in the most recent cohort were less likely to have completed schooling, fully entered the labor force, married, or become parents by their 30s than those in the older cohort. The cross-cohort drop in young adults completing schooling was more pronounced among youth from more disadvantaged family backgrounds, the drop in entering the labor force and having children was more pronounced among those from more advantaged backgrounds, and the drop in marriage did not differ by family background.
Bibliography Citation
Smith, Chelsea, Robert Crosnoe and Shih-Yi Chao. "Family Background and Contemporary Changes in Young Adults' School-Work Transitions and Family Formation in the United States." Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 46,A (December 2016): 3-10.