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Author: Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Career Patterns and Intragenerational Mobility Processes for Mature American Women
Ph.D. Dissertation, Texas A and M University, 1980. DAI-A 41/04, p. 1781, October 1980
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; Mobility, Social; Sex Roles; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Based on data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Work Experience, this research assesses three major life career patterns for mature American women: home, labor force, and mixed careers. The research then evaluates five general propositions and fourteen derived hypotheses concerning: (1) variability in the career patterns of mature American women; (2) differences in the intragenerational mobility of women with mixed and labor force careers; and (3) variations in the frequency of occupational change among women with labor force careers. In the first phase of the research, three general propositions and nine derived hypotheses are tested pertaining to the relationship between women's career patterns and their familial investments, human capital investments, and characteristics of the job and market. The findings provide support for the general propositions. All nine independent variables: marriage, children, mother's employment, husband's income, husband's attitude, health, education, earnings and demand for female labor are significantly related to overall variability in women's career patterns. More specifically, low human capital investments in health and education, as well as high familial investment in a conservative marriage (as reflected by husband's attitude) are associated with disproportionate representation of women with home careers. However, other attributes of familial investments and the job and market are not consistently associated with home careers. These findings suggest that mature American women are likely to experience substantial involvement in the labor force, i.e., mixed careers, regardless of their familial investments, human capital investments, or job characteristics. The second phase of the research assesses differences in intragenerational mobility between women with mixed and labor force career patterns. The findings do not suggest significantly different mobility processes for women with mixed or labor force careers. The three hypotheses regarding differences in the fact, frequency and type of mobility are not supported by the data. Women with these two dissimilar career patterns appear to evidence similar intragenerational mobility processes. The third phase of the research investigates the frequency of occupational change for women with labor force careers. The findings indicate that variables reflecting familial investments, human capital investments, and structural opportunities are correlated with the frequency of mobility. This phase of the research develops a five-variable summary model which explains six percent of individual level variation in the frequency of occupational change for white women and twenty percent for black women.
Bibliography Citation
Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran. Career Patterns and Intragenerational Mobility Processes for Mature American Women. Ph.D. Dissertation, Texas A and M University, 1980. DAI-A 41/04, p. 1781, October 1980.
2. Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Maret-Havens, Elizabeth G.
Women's Labor Force Participation--A Look at Some Residential Patterns
Monthly Labor Review 101,3 (March 1978): 38-41
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: U.S. Department of Labor
Keyword(s): Children; Earnings; Employment; Husbands, Influence; Marital Status; Rural Women; Rural/Urban Migration; Schooling; Urban and Regional Planning

Rural women--roughly one-third of the U.S. women--experience much less labor force activity than their urban counterparts. This study provides no support for the speculation that women in rural areas would be affected by greater opportunities for labor market activity. Conversely, the supply characteristics of rural women, although different in some respects from urban women, indicate a potentially large untapped resource for American labor.
Bibliography Citation
Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran and Elizabeth G. Maret-Havens. "Women's Labor Force Participation--A Look at Some Residential Patterns." Monthly Labor Review 101,3 (March 1978): 38-41.
3. Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Maret, Elizabeth G.
The Career Patterns of Mature American Women
Sociology of Work and Occupations 7,2 (May 1980): 222-251.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/7/2/222.abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Employment, Intermittent; Family Influences; Family Resources; Housework/Housewives; Husbands, Influence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study identifies three major life-career patterns of mature American women: home, labor force, and mixed careers. High commitment to traditional familial roles and values, high familial resources, and low human capital tend to reflect women with home careers. In comparison, low commitment to traditional roles and values, low familial resources, and high human capital represent women in the labor force. In addition, the results suggest that mature women are likely to have experienced considerable involvement in the labor force regardless of their familial investments, familial resources, or human capital investments.
Bibliography Citation
Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran and Elizabeth G. Maret. "The Career Patterns of Mature American Women." Sociology of Work and Occupations 7,2 (May 1980): 222-251.
4. Maret, Elizabeth G.
Chenoweth, Lillian Cochran
Labor Force Patterns of Mature Rural Women
Rural Sociology 44,4 (Winter 1979): 736-753
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: Rural Sociological Society
Keyword(s): Children; Earnings; Husbands, Influence; Marital Status; Rural Sociology; Rural Women; Schooling; Sex Roles; Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA); Work History

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Labor force participation of two samples of rural women are investigated. A comparison is made between those living within SMSAs and outside. The findings indicate substantial differences in supply and demand factors related to labor market activity.
Bibliography Citation
Maret, Elizabeth G. and Lillian Cochran Chenoweth. "Labor Force Patterns of Mature Rural Women." Rural Sociology 44,4 (Winter 1979): 736-753.