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Author: Conwell, Jordan A.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Conwell, Jordan A.
Quadlin, Natasha Y.
Race, Gender, Higher Education, and Socioeconomic Attainment: Evidence from Baby Boomers at Midlife
Social Forces 100,3 (March 2022): 990-1024.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/sf/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/sf/soab010/6155846
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; Colleges; Educational Returns; Ethnic Differences; Hispanics; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This article investigates White, Black, and Hispanic men's and women's access and midlife labor market returns to college quality. To do so, we use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 Cohort (NLSY-79), merged with college quality information from the Barron's Admissions Competitiveness Index. Although prior research has investigated similar dynamics in access and returns to higher education, this work typically excludes Hispanics and does not assess enrollments at community colleges and other less competitive colleges where Black and Hispanic enrollments tend to cluster. We find that Black-White and Hispanic-White differences in college quality, to Whites' advantage, were fully explained or reversed once we accounted for differences in students' backgrounds. At midlife, Hispanic and especially Black men had lower rates of labor force participation than White men who attended colleges of the same quality. Including such differences (i.e., years of no or part-time work) in assessing the earnings returns to college quality demonstrated striking disadvantages facing college-educated Black men relative to White men, which were not fully accounted for by background characteristics. Employment and earnings returns to college quality were not as disparate by race for women. Relative to White women, we find earnings advantages for Hispanic women among those who attended community colleges. This article demonstrates the utility of taking an intersectional and life course approach to the study of higher education and the economic returns to schooling.
Bibliography Citation
Conwell, Jordan A. and Natasha Y. Quadlin. "Race, Gender, Higher Education, and Socioeconomic Attainment: Evidence from Baby Boomers at Midlife." Social Forces 100,3 (March 2022): 990-1024.
2. Conwell, Jordan A.
Ye, Leafia Zi
All Wealth Is Not Created Equal: Race, Parental Net Worth, and Children's Achievement
RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 7,3 Wealth Inequality and Child Development: Implications for Policy and Practice (August 2021): 101-121.
Also: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7758/rsf.2021.7.3.05
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Keyword(s): Ethnic Differences; Family Resources; Net Worth; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Racial Differences

Using data from the children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, spanning 1986 to 2014, we investigated whether White, Black, and Hispanic children whose parents had the same wealth, measured as net worth, have equal math and reading achievement trajectories from age five through fourteen. Black and Hispanic children often had significantly worse scores than same-wealth Whites. We also found racial variation, to the disadvantage of Blacks and Hispanics relative to same-wealth Whites, in measures of family demographic context and financial portfolio composition, both of which research has linked to children's achievement. Whereas previous research has found that structural racial inequality contributes to racial differences in wealth, we find evidence of similar processes in same-wealth comparisons that have potential implications for children's academic success.
Bibliography Citation
Conwell, Jordan A. and Leafia Zi Ye. "All Wealth Is Not Created Equal: Race, Parental Net Worth, and Children's Achievement." RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences 7,3 Wealth Inequality and Child Development: Implications for Policy and Practice (August 2021): 101-121.
3. Wang, Jia
Conwell, Jordan A.
Higher Education and Health at Midlife: Evaluating the Role of College Quality
SSM - Population Health published online (11 September 2022): 101228.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352827322002075
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Characteristics; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale

Using the longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 linked with external data on college characteristics (N = 7056), this study illustrates an independent stratifying role of college quality in shaping health. College quality has significant and positive influences on physical health, and this positive association tends to strengthen across 40 and 50. By contrast, attending higher-quality colleges is not associated with mental health at either age 40 or age 50. Decompositions were conducted to assess the extent to which early life and demographic characteristics, employment and economic conditions, health behaviors, and family relationships account for observed patterns. Our study highlights the necessity for future research on education and health to incorporate characteristics of schools attended; reveals variation in the college quality-health nexus by specific health outcomes; and provides new insights into understanding health inequalities across the life course.
Bibliography Citation
Wang, Jia and Jordan A. Conwell. "Higher Education and Health at Midlife: Evaluating the Role of College Quality." SSM - Population Health published online (11 September 2022): 101228.