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Author: Deleone, Felicia Yang
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Deleone, Felicia Yang
Cohort and Generation Differences in Predictors of Early Fertility and Sex Among U.S. Immigrants: Evidence from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys Of Youth
Presented: Washington, DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM), Fall Research Conference, November 8-10, 2007.
Also: http://www.appam.org/conferences/fall/search_results.asp
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Childbearing, Premarital/Nonmarital; Gender Differences; Immigrants; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Modeling; Pre-natal Care/Exposure; Risk-Taking; Sexual Behavior; Unemployment Rate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines predictors of early fertility and sex among first and second generation adolescent immigrants in the United States using data from the 1997 and 1979 National Longitudinal Studies of Youth (NLSY97, NLSY79). Using discrete time logistic survival models, the influence of demographic, socioeconomic, and policy factors on immigrant adolescent fertility (as measured by early births) and risk behavior (as measured by age at first sex) is estimated. Particular attention is given to the role of immigrant-specific factors such as citizenship and immigration status, length of residence in the United States, language background, and, notably, public policy/contextual variables explicit to immigrants. For example, the analysis includes such variables as the poverty and unemployment rates in the geographic region in which a respondent resides as well as the percent immigrant and proportion of families using public assistance in the area. Other variables, such as child support enforcement policies and the welfare generosity of states to immigrants after the 1996 Welfare Reform Act, are considered as well. The analysis focuses on both the role of these factors in predicting sexual behavior and fertility among immigrants as well as the interaction between immigrant-specific characteristics and the demographic, socioeconomic, and policy factors commonly expected to influence adolescents in general. Differences in outcomes between male and female immigrants and across generations of immigrant adolescents are explored as well. By using two similar data sets collected two decades apart, differences both within and across cohorts of immigrant adolescents are explored. This research extends the literatures on immigrant adaptation and early fertility and is important as very little work has directly examined the effect of public policy and contextual factors on sex and childbearing among adolescent immigrants to the United States. Further, the research that exists has rarely considered cohort effects and has largely relied on single datasets. As immigrants and early and non-marital childbearing continue to be topics of great interest in the policymaking community, a study of this nature is particularly timely and relevant, not in the least because early fertility rates among some immigrant groups are especially high. The growing size and prominence of the immigrant population in the United States also contributes to the salience of this research.
Bibliography Citation
Deleone, Felicia Yang. "Cohort and Generation Differences in Predictors of Early Fertility and Sex Among U.S. Immigrants: Evidence from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys Of Youth." Presented: Washington, DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM), Fall Research Conference, November 8-10, 2007.
2. Deleone, Felicia Yang
Contextual and Policy Predictors of Early Fertility and Sex in the United States Immigrant Population
Ph.D. Dissertation, Cornell University, 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Birth; Census of Population; Education Indicators; Fertility; Financial Assistance; Immigrants; Natality Detail Files; Sexual Behavior; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The record volume of immigration to the United States in the past four decades coupled with dramatic changes in the characteristics of the foreign-born population have contributed to widespread interest in the social adjustment and economic consequences of the newest Americans. This dissertation addresses these issues by examining contextual and policy predictors of fertility and fertility-related behavior for U.S. immigrants using data from the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth, the 2000 Census Public Use Microdata Series, and the Vital Statistics Natality Detail Files. Immigrant fertility is an important topic of research because it serves both as an indicator of how well immigrants have assimilated to native norms along a fundamental dimension and as a barometer of growth in a distinct and increasingly salient U.S. population.

Chapter 1 looks at cohort and generation differences in levels and predictors of early fertility and sex among first, second, and third-plus generation young adults in the U.S. during the late 1970s and 1990s. The analyses seek to determine (1) how this behavior has changed by generation and arrival cohort and (2) what family and community factors predict these outcomes for immigrants. The study finds that first-generation immigrant youth exhibit the lowest levels of early fertility and sex, negatively assimilating by the third-plus generation. The findings suggest a positive association between arrival cohort early sex only. Further, the research fails to uncover significant predictors of these outcomes among first and second generation immigrants although the measures used have long been associated with them in the general population--suggesting that protective effects of generation reflect unmeasured cultural and social mechanisms.

Chapter 2 examines whether welfare policy changes occurring in the 1990s altered fertility outcomes for low-educated and unmarried foreign-born women. The study also looks at whether welfare reform had unintended consequences on immigrant women, like reducing prenatal care or decreasing the fertility of welfare-eligible or non-welfare dependent women through "chilling effects." The results show no consistent evidence that welfare policy changed fertility behavior among any immigrant group and raises doubt concerning the usefulness of targeting women's childbearing decisions with economic incentives.

Bibliography Citation
Deleone, Felicia Yang. Contextual and Policy Predictors of Early Fertility and Sex in the United States Immigrant Population. Ph.D. Dissertation, Cornell University, 2008.
3. Hynes, Kathryn
Joyner, Kara
Peters, H. Elizabeth
Deleone, Felicia Yang
The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys
Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/12/18-12.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): Adolescent Fertility; Age at First Intercourse; Data Analysis; Family Background; Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender; Male Sample; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Racial Studies

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study provides systematic information about the prevalence of early male fertility and the relationship between family background characteristics and early parenthood across three widely used data sources: the 1979 and 1997 National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth. We provide descriptive statistics on early fertility by age, sex, race, cohort, and data set. Because each data set includes birth cohorts with varying early fertility rates, prevalence estimates for early male fertility are relatively similar across data sets. Associations between background characteristics and early fertility in regression models are less consistent across data sets. We discuss the implications of these findings for scholars doing research on early male fertility. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Hynes, Kathryn, Kara Joyner, H. Elizabeth Peters and Felicia Yang Deleone. "The Transition to Early Fatherhood: National Estimates Based on Multiple Surveys." Demographic Research 18,12 (29 April 2008): 337-376.