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Author: Dougherty, Christopher
Resulting in 8 citations.
1. Dougherty, Christopher
Introduction to Econometrics, 4th Edition
New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Also: http://www.oup.com/uk/orc/bin/9780199280964/dougherty_chap14.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): NLS Description; Teaching Datasets/Teaching with the NLS

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The data set is a sub-set of a major US data-base, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79). NLSY79 is a panel survey in which a nationally-representative sample of young males and females aged 14 to 21 in 1979 have been re-interviewed since 1979. Until 1994 the interviews took place annually and now they are being conducted at two-yearly intervals. The core sample originally consisted of 3,003 males and 3,108 females. In addition there are special supplementary samples (some now discontinued) of ethnic minorities, those in poverty and those serving in the armed forces. Extensive background information was obtained in the base-year survey in 1979 and since then information has been updated each year on education, training, employment, marital status, fertility, health, child care and assets and income. In addition special sections have been added from time to time on other topics – for example, drug use. The surveys have been extremely detailed and the quality of the execution of the survey is very high. As a consequence NLSY79 is regarded as one of the most important data bases available to social scientists working with U.S. data.

The following is a publisher blurb:

Description:
Retaining the student-friendly approach of previous editions, Introduction to Econometrics, Fourth Edition, uses clear and simple mathematics notation and step-by step explanations of mathematical proofs to help students thoroughly grasp the subject. Extensive practical exercises throughout--including fifty exercises on the same dataset--build students' confidence and provide them with hands-on practice in applying techniques.

NEW TO THE FOURTH EDITION:
* An expanded review section at the beginning of the book offers a more comprehensive guide to all of the statistical concepts needed to study econometrics

* Additional exercises provide students with even more opportunities to put theory into practice

* More Monte C arlo simulations help students use visualization to understand the math

* New final sections at the end of each chapter contain summaries and non-technical introductions to more advanced topics

Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. Introduction to Econometrics, 4th Edition. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011..
2. Dougherty, Christopher
Numeracy, Literacy and Earnings: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Economics of Education Review 22,5 (October 2003): 511-522.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775703000402
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Education; Earnings; Educational Attainment; Educational Returns; Literacy

The analysis is concerned with the contributions of numeracy and literacy to earnings, for three reasons. First, no clear pattern emerges from existing findings relating to the contributions of different types of ability, and numeracy and literacy appear to be a natural basic starting point. Second, measures to improve numeracy and literacy are often given priority in policies intended to help those with lowest educational attainment. Third, with the growth of the knowledge-based economy, and the increasing importance of digital technology, it is of interest to compare the levels and rates of change of the contributions of numeracy and literacy as reflected in earnings. The results suggest that numeracy has a highly significant effect on earnings, mostly through its effect on college attainment, but also directly, controlling for attainment, and interactively with attainment, and its effect may be subject to increasing returns. While the magnitude of the effect is small in absolute terms, it is substantial when compared with other effects, and it appears to be increasing at a rate of 6% per year. Despite the fact that it has an even greater effect than numeracy on college attainment, literacy has a smaller and less significant effect on earnings, with no evidence of an interactive effect with attainment, nonlinearity, or change through time. Because of the absence of nonlinearity, measures to improve literacy may have more impact than measures to improve numeracy on the earnings of the least able, but the difference is not great and the quantitative effects appear to be small. [Copyright 2003 Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "Numeracy, Literacy and Earnings: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Economics of Education Review 22,5 (October 2003): 511-522.
3. Dougherty, Christopher
Observing Labor Market Adjustment: Employment in the US Construction Industry: 1983-1990
Discussion Paper 291, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, March 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics & Political Science
Keyword(s): Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Modeling; Occupations, Male; Skills; Training; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Average annual employment of males in the U.S. construction industry increased by 34 percent from 1983 to 1986. The paper takes the cohort of 440 male National Longitudinal Survey of Youth respondents born between October 1, 1961 and September 30, 1962 and evaluates the labor market experience of the 149 who worked in the construction sector during the period January 1983 to December 1990, examining the circumstances of entry and exit, training and changes in real wages and status. A comparison of the respondents' experience in the surge period 1983-1986 and the period of stability 1987-1990 reveals little difference, the construction sector exhibiting flexibility in its recruitment of labor and generation of skills. If labor market models form a spectrum with the manpower requirements model at one extreme, the neoclassical model in the center, and a pure quantity adjustment model at the other extreme, a compromise between the last two would appear to be an adequate characterization fo r the construction industry. This record is part of the Abstracts of Working Papers in Economics (AWPE) Database, copyright (c) 1996 Cambridge University Press.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "Observing Labor Market Adjustment: Employment in the US Construction Industry: 1983-1990." Discussion Paper 291, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, March 1996.
4. Dougherty, Christopher
Occupational Breaks, their Incidence and Implications for Training Provision: Case-Study Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
International Journal of Manpower 20,5 (1999): 309-323.
Also: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?issn=0143-7720&volume=20&issue=5&articleid=848245&show=abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: MCB University Press
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Education; Educational Attainment; Employment, History; Mobility, Job; Occupations; Training, Occupational; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Detailed education, employment and training histories have been constructed for a cohort of 440 male respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The employment histories show that most respondents without college degrees have experienced at least one occupational break since entering the labour force. The training histories show that most of those in employment in 1992 have had no formal training for their current occupations. An assessment of whether those who received training before or on entering the labour force have subsequently had more stable employment histories than those who have not shows that this is true of college-level vocational education but not of high school vocational education or training received in vocational/technical institutes. These findings suggest that the comprehensive provision of entry-level training for those not college-bound, as advocated by those promoting vocational education in high schools, cannot be justified in terms of labour market outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "Occupational Breaks, their Incidence and Implications for Training Provision: Case-Study Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." International Journal of Manpower 20,5 (1999): 309-323.
5. Dougherty, Christopher
Putting Training in Perspective: A Longitudinal Case-Study Approach
Discussion Paper 283, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, March 1996
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics & Political Science
Keyword(s): Apprenticeships; College Education; Education; Human Capital; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Manpower Programs; Mobility; Mobility, Occupational; Occupational Choice; Training; Training, On-the-Job; Vocational Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Detailed education, employment and training histories have been constructed for a cohort of 440 male respondents from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The data show that most respondents without college degrees have experienced at least one occupational break, defined as a change from one occupation to another sufficiently different in character that it does not make significant use of occupational skills acquired previously. The data also show that most of those in employment in 1992 had had no formal training for their current occupations and moreover thought that none was necessary. These findings imply that the comprehensive provision of entry-level training for those not college-bound, as advocated by those promoting vocational education in high schools or as practiced in those countries with comprehensive apprenticeship systems, is unlikely to have a direct impact on the performance of the economy or even on employment. Instead training priorities should be directed towards the provision of training as the demand arises and to improving access to college-level vocational education for those who can benefit from it. This record is part of the Abstracts of Working Papers in Economics (AWPE) Database, copyright (c) 1996 Cambridge University Press.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "Putting Training in Perspective: A Longitudinal Case-Study Approach." Discussion Paper 283, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, March 1996.
6. Dougherty, Christopher
The Impact of Work Experience and Training in the Current and Previous Occupations on Earnings: Micro Evidence From the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
Discussion Paper 456, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, England, May 2000.
Also: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/DP0456.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics & Political Science
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Job Tenure; Test Scores/Test theory/IRT; Training; Vocational Training

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the empirical literature on work experience, job tenure, training and earnings, only one previous study has made a distinction between the effects of work experience in the current occupation and work experience in previous ones, and no study has made the distinction with respect to training. Yet it is reasonable to hypothesize that the distinction is important. Using data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, it is found that the returns to work experience in the current occupation with previous employers are similar to those to work experience with the current employer, and that tenure has no independent effect. Similarly it is found that the distinction between training for current and previous occupations gives better results than a distinction between training for current and previous employers. It is found that work experience, classroom training and vocational institute training for the current occupation have highly significant effects on earnings, with work experience having by far the largest absolute impact. Apart from high school vocational institute training, which actually has a significantly negative effect on the earnings of those with high cognitive test scores, the previous-occupation counterparts do not have significant effects.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "The Impact of Work Experience and Training in the Current and Previous Occupations on Earnings: Micro Evidence From the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." Discussion Paper 456, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, England, May 2000.
7. Dougherty, Christopher
The Marriage Earnings Premium as a Distributed Fixed Effect
Journal of Human Resources 41,2 (Spring 2006): 433-443.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40057282
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Earnings; Gender Differences; Labor Market Outcomes; Marital Stability; Marriage; Modeling, Fixed Effects

Wage equations using cross-sectional data typically find an earnings premium in excess of 10 percent for married men. One leading hypothesis for the premium is that marriage facilitates specialization that enables married men to become more productive than single men. Another is that the premium is attributable to an unobserved fixed effect, married men possessing qualities that are valued in the labor market as well as the marriage market. This paper suggests that the premium is attributable to an unobserved time-distributed fixed effect that emerges and grows with the approach of marriage and continues to grow for some years after marriage. A similar distributed fixed effect is found in the case of women, but it is smaller and declines after a few years of marriage. The results appear to cast doubt on the specialization hypothesis.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "The Marriage Earnings Premium as a Distributed Fixed Effect ." Journal of Human Resources 41,2 (Spring 2006): 433-443.
8. Dougherty, Christopher
Why Are Returns to Schooling Higher for Women than for Men?
Journal of Human Resources 40,4 (Fall 2005): 969-988.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4129547
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Gender Differences

Many studies have found that the impact of schooling on earnings is greater for females than for males, despite the fact that females tend to earn less, both absolutely and controlling for personal characteristics. This study investigates possible reasons for this effect, using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979-. One explanation is that education appears to have a double effect on the earnings of women. It increases their skills and productivity, as it does with men, and in addition it appears to reduce the gap in male and female earnings attributable to factors such as discrimination, tastes, and circumstances. The latter appear to account for about half of the differential in the returns to schooling.
Bibliography Citation
Dougherty, Christopher. "Why Are Returns to Schooling Higher for Women than for Men?" Journal of Human Resources 40,4 (Fall 2005): 969-988.