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Author: Driscoll, Anne K.
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Driscoll, Anne K.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
The Relationship of Welfare Receipt to Child Outcomes
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, June 1997.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED428859&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED428859
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cognitive Ability; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare

ED428859
Receipt of welfare is often negatively correlated with children's outcomes. Yet, virtually all children who live in households that receive public assistance are poor, giving rise to the question of whether poor outcomes are truly an effect of welfare, a spurious relationship between welfare and child outcomes, or a result of welfare selection factors. Using children in the NLSY-CS aged 9-14 in 1992, these possibilities are examined by controlling for poverty and for selection onto welfare. Controlling for child and maternal characteristics accounts for the majority of bivariate negative associations between welfare and cognitive ability and behaviors problems among black children. Controlling for poverty does little to change the negative relationship between welfare and measures of children's academic achievement and behavior problems for either blacks or whites. Controlling for selection onto welfare, through a two-stage selection model, reduces, but does not eliminate the negative relationship between welfare receipt and outcomes among white children and has little discernible effect among black children.
Bibliography Citation
Driscoll, Anne K. and Kristin Anderson Moore. "The Relationship of Welfare Receipt to Child Outcomes." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, June 1997.
2. Driscoll, Anne K.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
The Relationship of Welfare Receipt to Child Outcomes
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 20,1 (Spring 1999): 85-113.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/x38027r8n40238t5/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Plenum Publishing Corporation
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Cognitive Ability; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Racial Differences; Welfare

Welfare receipt often is correlated negatively with children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes. Yet, virtually all children in households that receive public assistance are poor, prompting the question of whether poor outcomes are an effect of welfare, a spurious relationship between welfare and child outcomes, or a result of welfare selection. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement (NLSY-CS), these possibilities were examined by controlling for poverty and for selection into welfare. Controlling for child and maternal characteristics accounted for the majority of bivariate associations between welfare and outcomes among Black children. Controlling for poverty did little to change the relationship between welfare and outcomes for Black or White children. Controlling for selection into welfare further reduced the relationship between welfare receipt and outcomes among White children and had little discernible effect among Black children. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Driscoll, Anne K. and Kristin Anderson Moore. "The Relationship of Welfare Receipt to Child Outcomes." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 20,1 (Spring 1999): 85-113.
3. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Driscoll, Anne K.
Low-Wage Maternal Employment and Outcomes for Children a Study
The Future of Children: Welfare to Work 7,1, (Spring 1997).
Also: http://www.futureofchildren.org/pubs-info2825/pubs-info_show.htm?doc_id=72223
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs - Princeton - Brookings
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Wage Levels; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Despite the importance of anticipating how children may be affected by policies that move mothers off welfare and into employment, as the article by Zaslow and Emig in this journal issue points out, few research studies have addressed this critical policy question. To help fill that gap, this article presents the results of a new study using national survey data to examine child outcomes among families that had previously received welfare. About half the families studied had mothers who remained at home, the others were working at varying wage levels. The findings reported here echo themes discussed in the two preceding articles. Maternal employment does not appear to undermine children's social or cognitive development from ages 5 to 14, and it may yield advantages. Children whose mothers earned more than $5.00 per hour, particularly, had ,somewhat better outcomes than others. The authors emphasize, however, that background characteristics specific to the mothers who chose employment contributed to these positive outcomes. The authors add that it would be risky to apply these generalizations based on these findings to families forced into employment by welfare reform. Copyright 1997 by Center for the Future of Children. The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. All rights reserved.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson and Anne K. Driscoll. "Low-Wage Maternal Employment and Outcomes for Children a Study." The Future of Children: Welfare to Work 7,1, (Spring 1997).
4. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1998.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/17/88/f0.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Attainment; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Siblings

ED429683
Transitions into and out of poverty and welfare across a four-year time periods and their implications for math and reading skills and behavior are examined among a sample of ten and eleven year-olds. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement indicate that even with controls for factors that select families into poverty, children who do not experience poverty or welfare over this time period are advantaged relative to children who experience either. Children who are continuously poor but never receive welfare have more favorable outcomes than poor children who receive welfare. Among children experiencing changing economic circumstances, if the family manages to leave poverty, child outcomes are more positive; children whose families fall into poverty experience more negative outcomes than children living consistently above the poverty line. Fluctuations in family economic circumstances are also associated with poorer child outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll and Martha J. Zaslow. "Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1998.
5. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children
Welfare and Poverty Paper 2000-07, Washington DC: Child Trends, Inc., 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Welfare

To provide early insight into the possible implications of welfare reform for children, patterns of welfare receipt and poverty among a sample of ten and eleven year-olds are examined in detail across a four-year time period. Children's math and reading skills and behavior problems are analyzed using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement. Results indicate that early childhood experiences and maternal characteristics are powerful determinants of children's outcomes. Net of these selection factors, children who experienced stable albeit disadvantaged economic conditions did not have worse outcomes than those who were never poor. Children whose families' economic fortunes improved were not at higher risk for poor outcomes. However, children in families whose financial circumstances declined were more at risk for behavioral problems and scored lower on reading tests than never poor children, as did children whose situations fluctuated.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll and Martha J. Zaslow. "Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children." Welfare and Poverty Paper 2000-07, Washington DC: Child Trends, Inc., 2000.
6. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Redd, Zakia
Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children
Journal of Social Policy 31, 2 (April 2002), 207-227.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=102533&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0047279401006602
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In 1996, the US federal government passed welfare reform legislation. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act(PRWORA) altered greatly the circumstances under which families can receive public assistance, limiting receipt to 5 years, requiring work after 24 months, and allowing states to impose sanctions and other requirements such as family caps (Greenberg, 1999). Because many countries reforming their social welfare system look to the USA as one possible model, analyses of the effects of US welfare policy on children are of relevance internationally. We find that the population receiving welfare in the USA is highly diverse and that background differences and early experiences explain most of the associations between welfare and poverty and children's outcomes. After taking account of these background differences, we find that children who experienced stable albeit disadvantaged economic conditions did not have worse outcomes than children who were never poor. Nor were children whose families' economic fortunes improved at higher risk for poor outcomes. However, children in families whose financial circumstances declined or fluctuated were more at risk for behavioural problems and scored lower on reading tests than were children who had never been poor.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll, Martha J. Zaslow and Zakia Redd. "Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children." Journal of Social Policy 31, 2 (April 2002), 207-227.