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Author: Fasang, Anette
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Aisenbrey, Silke
Fasang, Anette
The Interplay of Work and Family Trajectories over the Life Course: Germany and the United States in Comparison
American Journal of Sociology 122,5 (March 2017): 1448-1484.
Also: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.1086/691128
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Cross-national Analysis; Family Formation; Gender Differences; Germany, German; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Occupational Prestige

This article uses sequence analysis to examine how gender inequality in work-family trajectories unfolds from early adulthood until middle age in two different welfare state contexts. Results based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the German National Education Panel Study demonstrate that in Germany, all work-family trajectories are highly gender-specific irrespective of social class. In contrast, patterns of work-family interplay across the life course in the United States are, overall, less gendered, but they differ widely by social class. In fact, work-family patterns characterized by high occupational prestige are fairly equally accessible for men and women. However, women are far more likely than men to experience the joint occurrence of single parenthood and unstable low-prestige work careers in the United States. The authors contribute to the literature by bringing in a longitudinal, process-oriented life course perspective and conceptualizing work-family trajectories as interlocked, multidimensional processes.
Bibliography Citation
Aisenbrey, Silke and Anette Fasang. "The Interplay of Work and Family Trajectories over the Life Course: Germany and the United States in Comparison." American Journal of Sociology 122,5 (March 2017): 1448-1484.
2. Aisenbrey, Silke
Fasang, Anette
Work-Family Trajectories in Germany and the United States
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Family Studies; Gender Differences; Germany, German; Labor Force Participation; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Across advanced societies women’s labor force participation has increased while fertility has declined over the past decades, albeit to varying degrees. To scrutinize the impact of macro-structural contexts on how men and women combine work and family from career entry until midlife, this study compares Germany and the United States. Results using longitudinal data and sequence analysis show that the conservative male breadwinner welfare state in Germany reinforces gender differences in work-family trajectories, whereas the liberal market and residual welfare state in the United States exacerbates differences by social class. Further, the American context provides a more gender-equal playing field for men and women in the most prestigious professional occupations, whereas work-family trajectories are most gendered at the bottom of the social structure. In contrast, in Germany, gendering of work-family trajectories is strong across the entire range of the social structure.
Bibliography Citation
Aisenbrey, Silke and Anette Fasang. "Work-Family Trajectories in Germany and the United States." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
3. Fasang, Anette
Aisenbrey, Silke
Grunow, Daniela
The Interplay of Family Formation and Early Work Careers in Germany and the United States
Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Family Formation; German Life History Study; Maternal Employment; Occupational Status

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How do men and women combine work and family in different welfare state contexts? In comparison to Germany, the US labor market has low employment security and low occupational boundaries. At the same time, Germany classifies as a single breadwinner welfare state, whereas the US is a dual-earner / dual-career welfare state that generally provides better options for women combine work and family. We use longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) and the German Life History Study (GLHS) to study work-family trajectories of men and women in these two institutional contexts. Results from multichannel sequence analysis show distinct work-family patterns for men and women that can be related to occupational status.
Bibliography Citation
Fasang, Anette, Silke Aisenbrey and Daniela Grunow. "The Interplay of Family Formation and Early Work Careers in Germany and the United States." Presented: New York NY, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2013.