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Author: Fisher, Benjamin W.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Widdowson, Alex O.
Fisher, Benjamin W.
Mass Incarceration and Subsequent Preventive Health Care: Mechanisms and Racial/Ethnic Disparities
American Journal of Public Health 110,S1 (January 2020): S145-S151.
Also: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2019.305448
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Arrests; Health Care; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Incarceration/Jail

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives. To examine the associations and mechanisms between 2 indicators of mass incarceration and preventive health care use and whether these associations are moderated by race/ethnicity.

Methods. We used 1997 to 2015-2016 data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (n = 7740) to examine the associations between arrest and incarceration at ages 18 to 27 years and cholesterol, blood sugar, and blood pressure screenings at age 29 years. Explanatory mechanisms included blocked access (health care coverage and medical checkup) and economic (education, employment, and income) factors. We used logistic regression to model main effects.

Results. Arrest was associated with lower odds of getting blood cholesterol, blood sugar, and blood pressure tests; incarceration was associated with lower odds of getting cholesterol and blood sugar tests; blocked access and economic factors mediated 42% to 125% of these associations. These associations were mostly consistent across race/ethnicity.

Conclusions. Mass incarceration contributes to decreases in preventive health care use, which are explained in part by blocked access and economic factors.

Bibliography Citation
Widdowson, Alex O. and Benjamin W. Fisher. "Mass Incarceration and Subsequent Preventive Health Care: Mechanisms and Racial/Ethnic Disparities." American Journal of Public Health 110,S1 (January 2020): S145-S151.
2. Widdowson, Alex O.
Garduno, L. Sergio
Fisher, Benjamin W.
The School-to-Gang Pipeline: Examining the Impact of School Suspension on Joining a Gang for the First Time
Crime and Delinquency published online (17 December 2020): DOI: 10.1177/0011128720981835.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0011128720981835
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Delinquency/Gang Activity; School Suspension/Expulsion

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study draws on labeling and routine activity theory to examine whether being suspended from school is associated with subsequent gang membership onset. With data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), we estimated discrete time models that predict gang membership onset from ages 12 to 19. The results revealed that being suspended from school at one wave was associated with an increased hazard on gang membership onset at the next wave. The results also revealed that although being suspended from school during one wave increased the hazard of gang membership onset, youth who are suspended during multiple waves tended to have an even higher hazard of gang membership onset.
Bibliography Citation
Widdowson, Alex O., L. Sergio Garduno and Benjamin W. Fisher. "The School-to-Gang Pipeline: Examining the Impact of School Suspension on Joining a Gang for the First Time." Crime and Delinquency published online (17 December 2020): DOI: 10.1177/0011128720981835.