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Author: Gerhart, Barry
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Gerhart, Barry
How Important are Dispositional Factors as Determinants of Job Satisfaction? Implications for Job Design and Other Personnel Programs
Journal of Applied Psychology 72,3 (August 1987): 366-373.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/apl/72/3/366/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Job Requirements; Job Satisfaction; Work Attitudes

According to recent research, including a 1985 study by Staw and Ross, worker attitudes are, to a large degree a function of stable individual traits, not situational characteristics. This implies that job redesign and related personnel programs are prone to failure because they only change the job situation. Problems with this study, which used men 45 to 59 and 50 to 64 years of age, prompted another study designed to examine the relationship of job satisfaction with dispositional and situational factors in younger adults. The NLSY, a national probability sample interviewed annually, provided data for the study. Two measures of job complexity were analyzed in order to determine how changes in complexity impacted job satisfaction. The study found that changes in complexity and other situational factors are important predictors of job satisfaction, while dispositional factors present measurement problems that preclude their use as accurate predictors. These results are contrary to the findings of Staw and Ross. [ABI/INFORM]
Bibliography Citation
Gerhart, Barry. "How Important are Dispositional Factors as Determinants of Job Satisfaction? Implications for Job Design and Other Personnel Programs." Journal of Applied Psychology 72,3 (August 1987): 366-373.
2. Gerhart, Barry
Sources of Variance in Incumbent Perceptions of Job Complexity
Journal of Applied Psychology 73,2 (May 1988): 154-162.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/apl/73/2/154/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Job Requirements; Occupations

Substantive research in the job design area has relied heavily on incumbent-based perceptions of job complexity (IPJC) measures (e.g., the Job Characteristics Inventory and the Job Diagnostic Survey). However, little research has addressed the construct validity of IPJC measures. The present study used longitudinal data to assess the convergent validity of an IPJC measure by examining its relation with an independent measure of complexity derived from the fourth edition of the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT-complexity). In addition, discriminant validity is assessed by examining the relation between the IPJC measure and a relatively broad range of individual (e.g., education) and situational (e.g., pay level) variables, controlling for DOT-complexity. The data are taken from the NLSY (ages 16-21 in 1979; 19-24 in 1982). Results indicated that IPJC did converge significantly with DOT-complexity. Moreover, the set of individual and situational factors did not add significant explanatory power to an equation predicting IPJC using only DOT-complexity, thus providing support for the discriminant validity of the IPJC measure as well. These results may help alleviate reservations concerning previous substantive job design research that has relied almost exclusively on IPJC measures. [MGMT CONTENTS]
Bibliography Citation
Gerhart, Barry. "Sources of Variance in Incumbent Perceptions of Job Complexity." Journal of Applied Psychology 73,2 (May 1988): 154-162.
3. Gerhart, Barry
Cheikh, Nabil El
Earnings and Percentage Female: A Longitudinal Study
Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 31,1 (January 1991): 62-78.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1468-232X.1991.tb00775.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley
Keyword(s): Comparable Worth; Discrimination, Job; Discrimination, Sex; Earnings; Employment, Intermittent; Gender Differences; Occupations, Female; Unions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Comparable worth advocates assume that the relation between earnings and percentage female in an occupation is due to crowding or other forms of discrimination. An alternative explanation is that the relation stems from women freely choosing different occupations. Using longitudinal data to control for time-invariant omitted variables, as well as cross-sectional data (for comparison with previous research), we find that although men's estimated penalty is not reduced, the percentage female penalty falls substantially for women and is not statistically significant. These results imply that estimates of the percentage female effect based on cross-sectional data may be inflated for women–except for those with intermittent labor force participation. This group does experience a sizeable penalty for working in female-dominated occupations. Hence, a comparable worth policy would most likely benefit women with discontinuous employment.
Bibliography Citation
Gerhart, Barry and Nabil El Cheikh. "Earnings and Percentage Female: A Longitudinal Study." Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society 31,1 (January 1991): 62-78.