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Author: Gius, Mark Paul
Resulting in 16 citations.
1. Gius, Mark Paul
An Estimate of the Effects of Age, Taxes, and Other Socioeconomic Variables on the Alcoholic Beverage Demand of Young Adults
Social Science Journal 42,1 (January 2005): 13-24.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362331904001041
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Alcohol Use; Geocoded Data; Socioeconomic Factors; Taxes

The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects that age, taxes and other socioeconomic variables have on the alcoholic beverage demand of young adults. OLS regression analysis, in combination with a Chow Test and a pooled data set, is used to determine the effects of age, taxes and other socioeconomic variables on alcohol consumption. NLSY-Geocode data is used in the analysis. Results suggest that taxes have minor effects on alcohol consumption, and the only factors that are statistically significant in all analyses are marital status, sex, race, and level of education. In addition, statistical tests indicate that the factors that affect alcohol consumption change as a person ages.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "An Estimate of the Effects of Age, Taxes, and Other Socioeconomic Variables on the Alcoholic Beverage Demand of Young Adults." Social Science Journal 42,1 (January 2005): 13-24.
2. Gius, Mark Paul
Determinants of the Violent Criminal Behavior of Teenagers
Atlantic Economic Journal 34,4 (2006): 511-512.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e53035727313r230/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Crime; Family Influences; Modeling, Probit; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research conducted by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse and Columbia University has shown that children who frequently have dinner with their families are much less likely to smoke, drink, or use illicit drugs (Connecticut Post, 2005). An interesting extension of this research would be to determine if family influences have any effect on the propensity of teenagers to commit crimes.

Assuming an individual is a non-adult teenager (ages 12-17), earns no income, and the criminal act is non-monetary in nature, one may model criminal behavior as a utility-maximizing problem. A teenager would attempt to maximize his or her utility by allocating his or her time between criminal and non-criminal activities. The constraint would be total time in a given day. It is assumed that parental and peer influences will affect a teenager's propensity to commit a criminal act. If all influences are positive in nature, then all time is spent pursuing non-criminal activities, since criminal activities are viewed as bads and not goods. If, however, the influences are negative in nature, then the individual would engage in criminal activities, since both criminal activities and leisure would be viewed as goods.

Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "Determinants of the Violent Criminal Behavior of Teenagers." Atlantic Economic Journal 34,4 (2006): 511-512.
3. Gius, Mark Paul
Health Insurance and Young Adults: An Analysis Using the NLSY
Atlantic Economic Journal 38,3 (September 2010): 381-382.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/4q4g367lq80282r8/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Insurance, Health; Regions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The article focuses on the use of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in analyzing the health insurances of young adults in the U.S. The use of the NLSY intends to determine the factors that affect the health insurance coverage of young adults. The logistic regression has been used in formulating the equation of the NLSY.

One group which is typically discussed in regards to its lack of health insurance is the young adult segment of the population. For the age group 18-26, 32% lack health insurance (Holahan and Kenney, Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issue, 2008). For the entire non-elderly population, the uninsured rate is closer to 18%. In addition, although this age group constitutes only 18% of the adult population, it makes up over 28% of the uninsured (Holahan and Kenney, Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issue, 2008). Because of this, the young adult segment of the population is the ideal group to use in an analysis of the determinants of health insurance coverage.

Several studies have been conducted on health insurance coverage (Markowitz, Gold, and Rice, Medical Care, 1991; Newacheck, et al., Pediatrics, 1999; Callahan and Cooper, Pediatrics, 2005; Gruber, Journal of Economic Literature, 2008; Levine, McKnight, and Heep, NBER Working Paper, 2009; and Gius, International Journal of Applied Economics, 2010). Most of these studies used descriptive statistics and correlation analyses to ascertain the extent of the uninsured. Few looked at the determinants of health insurance coverage, and even fewer examined the insurance coverage rates of young adults.

The purpose of the present study is to determine the factors that affect the health insurance coverage of young adults. This study will use as its data set the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), a data set that has not been used in prior studies on health insurance coverage.

Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "Health Insurance and Young Adults: An Analysis Using the NLSY." Atlantic Economic Journal 38,3 (September 2010): 381-382.
4. Gius, Mark Paul
The Economics of the Criminal Behavior of Young Adults: Estimation of an Economic Model of Crime with a Correction for Aggregate Market and Public Policy Variables - Statistical Data Included
American Journal of Economics and Sociology 58,4 (1999): 947-957.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1536-7150.1999.tb03402.x/pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Inc.
Keyword(s): Crime; Gender Differences; Modeling, Logit; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Racial Differences

This study uses a combination of individual-level and county-level data to estimate an economic model of crime for young adults similar to that used by Becker (1968) and Trumbull (1989). In order to estimate a model of crime in which both individual-level and county-level data are used, it is necessary to take account of the bias introduced by using aggregate-level data in conjunction with individual-level data. In order to eliminate this bias, a technique derived by Moulton (1990) is employed. Results from a logit regression model indicate that race, sex, and peer pressure have statistically significant effects on the probability that a young adult will commit a crime. Results also suggest that police presence, as measured by county-level per capita police expenditures, does not deter young adults from committing crimes.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Economics of the Criminal Behavior of Young Adults: Estimation of an Economic Model of Crime with a Correction for Aggregate Market and Public Policy Variables - Statistical Data Included." American Journal of Economics and Sociology 58,4 (1999): 947-957.
5. Gius, Mark Paul
The Effect of Curfews on Juvenile Criminal Activity: An Individual-Level Analysis
Presented: Boston, MA, 68th International Atlantic Economic Conference, R10-1 Urban and Regional Economics, 8-11 October 2009.
Also: http://iaes.confex.com/iaes/Boston68/techprogram/P3262.HTM
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Crime; Geocoded Data; Geographical Variation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of the present study is to determine the impact of juvenile curfews on the criminal activities of young adults. Using individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Survey Youth - Geocode (NLSY) data set and estimating an economic model of crime for young adults, the present study finds that curfews have no statistically-significant effect on youth-related criminal behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Effect of Curfews on Juvenile Criminal Activity: An Individual-Level Analysis." Presented: Boston, MA, 68th International Atlantic Economic Conference, R10-1 Urban and Regional Economics, 8-11 October 2009.
6. Gius, Mark Paul
The Effect of Income Taxes on Interstate Migration: An Analysis by Age and Race
Annals of Regional Science 46,1 (February 2011): 205-218.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/m6818845052r8251/fulltext.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Geocoded Data; Geographical Variation; Income; Job Status; Migration; Racial Differences; State-Level Data/Policy; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The topic of interstate migration and the effects of taxes on migration have been extensively studied. Prior research has examined not only many possible determinants of migration but also the migrations of various populations, including the elderly, African-Americans, and the college educated. The present study will attempt to differentiate itself from this prior research by looking at the effect of income taxes on the interstate migration of both whites and African-Americans at various ages. Another distinguishing feature of the present study is that it will use data from the NLSY-Geocode, a data set not used previously for this type of study. Results of the present study are similar to the results of prior works; income taxes have an effect on migration for most races and age groups. Individuals move from states with high income taxes to states with low income taxes; these results corroborate the results obtained from the use of aggregate, state-level data. In addition, results of the present study suggest that non-economic factors, such as ties to a particular state and changes in employment status, are also important factors in an individual's migration decision.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Effect of Income Taxes on Interstate Migration: An Analysis by Age and Race ." Annals of Regional Science 46,1 (February 2011): 205-218.
7. Gius, Mark Paul
The Effect of Taxes on Alcoholic Consumption: An Individual Level of Analysis with a Correction for Aggregate Public Policy Variables
Pennsylvania Economic Review 11,1 (Spring 2002): 76-93
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Pennsylvania Economic Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Modeling, OLS; Modeling, Probit; State-Level Data/Policy; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study estimates alcohol demand functions at the individual level in order to determine the effect of taxes on alcoholic beverage demand. The present study combines two unique data sets: the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and data on alcoholic beverage taxes at the state level. Using ordinary least squares and binomial probit regression analyses, both of which are corrected for aggregate public policy variables, results of the present study indicate that alcoholic beverage taxes (distilled spirits taxes, wine taxes, and beer taxes) have no effect on the alcoholic beverage consumption of adults aged 29-33 years. Binge drinking (defined as having 6 or more drinks on one occasion) is also not affected by taxes. A revised regression that eliminates the aggregate variables results in a finding that taxes may have a statistically-significant effect on alcohol consumption.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Effect of Taxes on Alcoholic Consumption: An Individual Level of Analysis with a Correction for Aggregate Public Policy Variables." Pennsylvania Economic Review 11,1 (Spring 2002): 76-93.
8. Gius, Mark Paul
The Effects of Curfews on Juvenile Criminal Activity: An Individual-Level Analysis
Applied Economics Letters 18,4 (March 2011): 311-313.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504851003689643
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Arrests; Behavior, Antisocial; Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Geocoded Data

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of juvenile curfews on the criminal activities of young adults. Using individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Geocode (NLSY) data set and estimating an economic model of crime for young adults, this study finds that although curfews have no statistically significant effect on the criminal behaviour of young adults, they do have a negative effect on the arrests of young adults. These results differ somewhat from the results of prior studies but lend support to community officials who believe that curfews are an effective tool in combating juvenile crime.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Effects of Curfews on Juvenile Criminal Activity: An Individual-Level Analysis." Applied Economics Letters 18,4 (March 2011): 311-313.
9. Gius, Mark Paul
The Impact of Head Start Participation on the Criminal Behavior of Teenagers
New York Economic Review 28 (Fall 2007): 63- 71.
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: New York State Economics Association
Keyword(s): Arrests; Behavioral Problems; Crime; Head Start

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of the present study is to estimate the effect of Head Start participation on the criminal behavior of teenagers. Using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data, the present study finds that participation in the Head Start program does not reduce the likelihood that a person engages in criminal activity. In fact, results of the present study show that, holding all other factors constant, teenagers who had participated in the Head Start program as children were more likely to be arrested but were no more likely to commit a crime than a teenager who did not participate in the program as a child. These results are rather robust since factors such as race, sex, and family and peer influences are all held constant
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Impact of Head Start Participation on the Criminal Behavior of Teenagers." New York Economic Review 28 (Fall 2007): 63- 71.
10. Gius, Mark Paul
The Impact of Job Mobility on Earnings: Using Occupational and Industrial Classifications to Identify Job Changes
International Review of Applied Economics 28,2 (March 2014): 181-190.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02692171.2013.838545#.UvveIxDvDpV
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Earnings; Industrial Classification; Mobility, Job; Occupational Status; Occupations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median number of years that a US worker has been with their current employer is 4.4 years. Although many job changes may not be classified as ‘career changes,’ any type of job change may have an impact on a person’s future earnings. In the present study, the following three types of job changes are examined in order to determine which ones result in higher incomes: a change in occupational status; a change in industry; or a change in both. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), a log-linear wage regression with a correction for self-selection is estimated. Results suggest that changing jobs within the same industry or within the same occupation both increase a person’s income. However, a job change that is characterized by both a change in industry and occupation reduces a person’s income. The present study is one of the few studies to examine the effects of job mobility on earnings when mobility is defined in the context of changes in occupational and/or industrial classification.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Impact of Job Mobility on Earnings: Using Occupational and Industrial Classifications to Identify Job Changes." International Review of Applied Economics 28,2 (March 2014): 181-190.
11. Gius, Mark Paul
The Impact of Provider Availability and Legal Restrictions on the Demand for Abortions by Young Women
Social Science Journal 44,3 (July 2007): 495-506.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0362331907000894
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: JAI Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Abortion; Contraception; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Factors; State-Level Data/Policy

The purpose of the present study is to determine the factors that affect the abortion decision at the individual level. Using individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and state-level data on abortion providers and legal restrictions on abortions, results suggest that legal restrictions had no statistically significant effects on the abortion decision, but that the number of per capita abortion providers does affect the decision whether or not to abort a fetus. Socioeconomic characteristics, such as age and race, also have effects on the abortion decision. [Copyright 2007 Elsevier]

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Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Impact of Provider Availability and Legal Restrictions on the Demand for Abortions by Young Women." Social Science Journal 44,3 (July 2007): 495-506.
12. Gius, Mark Paul
The Impact of Ultrasound Laws on the Demand for Abortions by Young Women
Journal of Applied Business and Economics 12,5 (October 2011): 54-65.
Also: http://www.na-businesspress.com/JABE/jabescholar.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: North American Business Press
Keyword(s): Abortion; Legislation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The purpose of the present study is to determine if laws requiring ultrasounds have any effect on abortion. Using individual-level data from the NLSY and a sample selection model, results suggest that ultrasound requirement laws have a negative effect on the abortion decision of a young woman. In addition to the ultrasound requirement laws, other important determinants of the decision to abort were marital status, the presence of other children, and urban residence.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Impact of Ultrasound Laws on the Demand for Abortions by Young Women." Journal of Applied Business and Economics 12,5 (October 2011): 54-65.
13. Gius, Mark Paul
The Prevalence of Obesity and Overweight Among Young Adults: An Analysis Using the NLSY
International Journal of Applied Economics 8,1 (March 2011): 36-45.
Also: http://www2.selu.edu/orgs/ijae/index_files/IJAE%20MARCH%202011%20GIUS%204-20-2011%20WP.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Institute of International Economic Studies
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Exercise; Genetics; Income Level; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Obesity; Racial Differences; Sleep; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

According to the National Center for Health Statistics, 145 million Americans are overweight, and 74 million are obese. In addition, rates of obesity for almost all demographic groups have increased dramatically over the past thirty years. The purpose of the present study is to ascertain the determinants of both obesity and overweight among young adults. Results indicate that the factors that are associated with being overweight are not the same factors that are associated with being obese. Higher income persons are more likely to be overweight but are less likely to be obese. Men are more likely to be overweight but less likely to be obese. Race has no relationship to overweight, but African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely to be obese. Healthy living habits, such as exercising and eating right, are not related to overweight but are related to obesity. However, the most statistically significant factor associated with being both overweight and obese is whether the individual was obese or overweight five years earlier. This result suggests that past behaviors or genetics have much greater impacts on the likelihood of being obese or overweight than do socioeconomic or demographic factors.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "The Prevalence of Obesity and Overweight Among Young Adults: An Analysis Using the NLSY." International Journal of Applied Economics 8,1 (March 2011): 36-45.
14. Gius, Mark Paul
Using NLSY to Estimate the Determinants of the Violent Criminal Behavior of Teenagers
Pennsylvania Economic Review 15,2 (Fall 2007):
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Pennsylvania Economic Association
Keyword(s): Child Care; Children; Crime; Family Influences; Family Planning; Fertility; Illegal Activities; Modeling, Probit; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "Using NLSY to Estimate the Determinants of the Violent Criminal Behavior of Teenagers." Pennsylvania Economic Review 15,2 (Fall 2007): .
15. Gius, Mark Paul
Using NLSY-Geocode Data to Determine the Effects of Taxes and Minimum Age Laws on the Alcoholic Beverage Demand of Young Adults
New York Economic Review 34 (Fall 2003) 38-50.
Also: http://organizations.oneonta.edu/nysea/fall2003.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: New York State Economics Association
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Geocoded Data; Geographical Variation; Modeling, Logit; State-Level Data/Policy; Taxes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In the present study, OLS and logit regression analysis are used to determine the effect that minimum age laws and taxes have on alcohol consumption and binge drinking. NLSY-Geocode data are used in order to construct individual-level demand equations. The use of this data allows for the identification of the individual's state of residence and thus enables the researcher to properly match the individual to the appropriate state alcohol tax rate. Results indicate that taxes have a negative effect on alcohol consumption but no effect on binge drinking. Minimum age laws, however, are effective in reducing both the total quantity of alcohol consumed and binge drinking.
Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "Using NLSY-Geocode Data to Determine the Effects of Taxes and Minimum Age Laws on the Alcoholic Beverage Demand of Young Adults." New York Economic Review 34 (Fall 2003) 38-50.
16. Gius, Mark Paul
Ceccucci, Wendy
The Impact of Information Technology on Labour Productivity in the Service and Trade Sectors of the USA
Briefing Notes in Economics 45 (June/July 2000): 1-6.
Also: http://www.richmond.ac.uk/bne/MarkGius.PDF
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Richmond - The American International University in London
Keyword(s): Computer Use; Information Networks; Labor Productivity; Technology/Technological Changes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The last two decades have witnessed an explosion in the power and capabilities of ordinary computers and information technology equipment in general. Even more interesting, however, is the fact that, between 1960 and 1990, the price of computing, or processing power, in the US shrank in real terms by a factor of 6000 (Economist, 1991, p.30)1. Getting more computing power for less money has not escaped the interest of US business enterprises. In 1970, information technology equipment accounted for 11% of all durable equipment purchased by private enterprises; by 1989, that figure had risen to 51% (Economist, 1991, p.30).

Unfortunately, it has been difficult to establish whether the extent of such investments in information technology has resulted in any realized cost savings or any increase in labour productivity. Existing empirical studies of the relationship between information technology deepening and labour productivity have yielded conflicting results. At the aggregate level, Oliner and Sichel (1994) find that information technology does not make a significant contribution to output growth. Using industry level data, Morrison and Berndt (1991) find that computing technology has had only a very small impact on technical progress. In another study, Morrison and Berndt (1992), find that, in most industries, integration of processing power is uncorrelated with multi-factor productivity. Parsons, et al (1993) report very low returns for information technology investments for Canadian banks.

Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul and Wendy Ceccucci. "The Impact of Information Technology on Labour Productivity in the Service and Trade Sectors of the USA." Briefing Notes in Economics 45 (June/July 2000): 1-6.