Search Results

Author: Glei, Dana A.
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1998.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/17/88/f0.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Current Population Survey (CPS) / CPS-Fertility Supplement; Educational Attainment; Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID); Siblings

ED429683
Transitions into and out of poverty and welfare across a four-year time periods and their implications for math and reading skills and behavior are examined among a sample of ten and eleven year-olds. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement indicate that even with controls for factors that select families into poverty, children who do not experience poverty or welfare over this time period are advantaged relative to children who experience either. Children who are continuously poor but never receive welfare have more favorable outcomes than poor children who receive welfare. Among children experiencing changing economic circumstances, if the family manages to leave poverty, child outcomes are more positive; children whose families fall into poverty experience more negative outcomes than children living consistently above the poverty line. Fluctuations in family economic circumstances are also associated with poorer child outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll and Martha J. Zaslow. "Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, 1998.
2. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children
Welfare and Poverty Paper 2000-07, Washington DC: Child Trends, Inc., 2000
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Welfare

To provide early insight into the possible implications of welfare reform for children, patterns of welfare receipt and poverty among a sample of ten and eleven year-olds are examined in detail across a four-year time period. Children's math and reading skills and behavior problems are analyzed using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement. Results indicate that early childhood experiences and maternal characteristics are powerful determinants of children's outcomes. Net of these selection factors, children who experienced stable albeit disadvantaged economic conditions did not have worse outcomes than those who were never poor. Children whose families' economic fortunes improved were not at higher risk for poor outcomes. However, children in families whose financial circumstances declined were more at risk for behavioral problems and scored lower on reading tests than never poor children, as did children whose situations fluctuated.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll and Martha J. Zaslow. "Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children." Welfare and Poverty Paper 2000-07, Washington DC: Child Trends, Inc., 2000.
3. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Glei, Dana A.
Driscoll, Anne K.
Zaslow, Martha J.
Redd, Zakia
Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children
Journal of Social Policy 31, 2 (April 2002), 207-227.
Also: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=102533&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0047279401006602
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In 1996, the US federal government passed welfare reform legislation. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act(PRWORA) altered greatly the circumstances under which families can receive public assistance, limiting receipt to 5 years, requiring work after 24 months, and allowing states to impose sanctions and other requirements such as family caps (Greenberg, 1999). Because many countries reforming their social welfare system look to the USA as one possible model, analyses of the effects of US welfare policy on children are of relevance internationally. We find that the population receiving welfare in the USA is highly diverse and that background differences and early experiences explain most of the associations between welfare and poverty and children's outcomes. After taking account of these background differences, we find that children who experienced stable albeit disadvantaged economic conditions did not have worse outcomes than children who were never poor. Nor were children whose families' economic fortunes improved at higher risk for poor outcomes. However, children in families whose financial circumstances declined or fluctuated were more at risk for behavioural problems and scored lower on reading tests than were children who had never been poor.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Dana A. Glei, Anne K. Driscoll, Martha J. Zaslow and Zakia Redd. "Poverty and Welfare Patterns: Implications for Children." Journal of Social Policy 31, 2 (April 2002), 207-227.
4. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Morrison, Donna Ruane
Glei, Dana A.
Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Family Economic Resources and Children's Development
Presented: Washington, DC, Workshop on Welfare and Child Development, sponsored by the Board on Children and Families and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Family and Child Well-Being Network, 1994
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
Keyword(s): Child Development; Children, Well-Being; Family Resources; Family Studies

Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Donna Ruane Morrison and Dana A. Glei. "Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Family Economic Resources and Children's Development." Presented: Washington, DC, Workshop on Welfare and Child Development, sponsored by the Board on Children and Families and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Family and Child Well-Being Network, 1994.
5. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Morrison, Donna Ruane
Zaslow, Martha J.
Glei, Dana A.
Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development
Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, September 1995
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Child Development; Children, Well-Being; Cognitive Development; Family Background and Culture; Family Resources; Family Studies; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Poverty; Welfare

Revised and under review. Direct correspondence to Kristin A. Moore, 4301 Connecticut Ave., Suite 100, Washington DC, 20008. This paper examines transitions into and from welfare and poverty across the time period from 1986 to 1990. and their implications for children's math achievement, reading skills, and behavior and the level of emotional support and cognitive stimulation provided in children's homes. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Child Supplement indicate that even with controls for factors that select family into poverty, children who do not experience poverty or welfare over this time period are advantaged relative to children who experience poverty or welfare; and that children who are continuously poor but never receive welfare have fewer behavior problems as reported by their mothers than children who receive welfare. Among children experiencing changing economic circumstances, if the family manages to leave poverty child outcomes are more positive; and children whose families fall from above the poverty level into welfare experience high levels of behavior problems. Frequent fluctuations in family economic circumstances are also associated with poorer child outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Donna Ruane Morrison, Martha J. Zaslow and Dana A. Glei. "Ebbing and Flowing, Learning and Growing: Transitions in Family Economic Resources and Children's Development." Working Paper, Child Trends, Inc., Washington DC, September 1995.
6. Morrison, Donna Ruane
Glei, Dana A.
Assessing Family Strengths in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement
Working Paper, Washington DC: Child Trends, June 1993.
Also: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/15/2e/82.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Family Studies; Gender Differences; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Labor Market Outcomes; Marital Stability; Methods/Methodology; Mothers, Income; Self-Esteem; Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC); Siblings; Wage Rates; Work Hours

ED415994
In this paper we develop and estimate a factor model of the earnings, labor supply, and wages of young men and young women, their parents and their siblings. We estimate the model using data on matched sibling and parent-child pairs from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience. We measure the extent to which a set of unobserved parental and family factors that drive wage rates and work hours independently of wage rates lead to similarities among family members in labor market outcomes. We find strong family similarities in work hours that run along gender lines. These similarities are primarily due to preferences rather than to labor supply responses to family similarities in wages. The wage factors of the father and mother influence the wages of both sons and daughters. A 'sibling' wage factor also plays an important role in wage determination. We find that intergenerational correlations in wages substantially overestimate the direct influence of fathers, and especially mothers, on wages. This is because the father's and mother's wage factors are positively correlated. The relative importance for the variance in earnings of the direct effect of wages, the labor supply response induced by wages, and effect of hours preferences varies by gender, and by age in the case of women. For all groups most of the effect of wages on earnings is direct rather than through a labor supply response.
Bibliography Citation
Morrison, Donna Ruane and Dana A. Glei. "Assessing Family Strengths in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - Child Supplement." Working Paper, Washington DC: Child Trends, June 1993.