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Author: Goldman, Alyssa
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Goldman, Alyssa
Examining the Effects of Adult Children's Incarceration on Mothers' Health
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Incarceration/Jail; Mothers, Health; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent scholarly attention highlights the negative effects of mass incarceration on the health of inmates, their partners, and children. Considerably less research examines the health implications for the parents of those adults who experience incarceration. This is a potentially important omission when estimating the "spillover" effects of the prison boom, as parents of the incarcerated may bear the burden of their child's incarceration in a number of ways that can adversely impact their health and wellbeing. In this study, I use the NLSY79 Child and Young Adults survey to estimate how having a child who experiences incarceration may impact mothers' well-being. Findings suggest that the mothers of those who directly experience incarceration may disproportionately experience poorer general health. I consider potential mechanisms of this association in light of prior research on incarceration and family wellbeing, as well as the implications for health disparities and aging.
Bibliography Citation
Goldman, Alyssa. "Examining the Effects of Adult Children's Incarceration on Mothers' Health." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.
2. Goldman, Alyssa
How Much Would Eliminating Drug Crimes Decrease Racial/Ethnic Gaps in Criminal Conviction?
Social Science Research 76 (November 2018): 65-76.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X17308074
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Crime; Criminal Justice System; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences

Since the 1970s, criminal justice contact has become an increasingly common event in early adulthood, and disproportionately so for African American men. Policymakers often argue that reducing drug-related conviction rates is among the easiest ways to reduce racial/ethnic disparities in incarceration. These arguments are often backed by statistics that convey the number of drug offenders in contact with the criminal justice system at a given point in time. Unfortunately, we know little about the extent to which over-time conviction risk and associated racial/ethnic disparities may be affected by drug-related policy changes. Using a novel application of the single decrement life table to analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97), I present a quantitative thought experiment to consider the extent to which the elimination of drug-related offenses would affect racial/ethnic disparities in men's cumulative probability of conviction by age 30. Consistent with prior research, results indicate that black men are at disproportionately higher risk of ever experiencing a drug-related conviction, and of experiencing a drug-related conviction at each conviction instance. More surprising, however, is the finding that while the removal of drug sentencing may significantly impact racial/ethnic disparities associated with conviction, only a relatively small proportion of those ever convicted would avoid conviction altogether in the absence of drug-related sentencing.
Bibliography Citation
Goldman, Alyssa. "How Much Would Eliminating Drug Crimes Decrease Racial/Ethnic Gaps in Criminal Conviction?" Social Science Research 76 (November 2018): 65-76.