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Author: Griffith, Jeanne Elaine
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. Griffith, Jeanne Elaine
Unemployment, Occupational Mobility, and Retirement: A Survey of Policies and Experiences
Ph.D. Dissertation, Johns Hopkins University, 1984. DAI-A 45/11, p. 3457, May 1985
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Behavior; Control; Income; Mobility; Occupational Status; Racial Differences; Retirement; Unemployment

This dissertation examines the relationships among late-life unemployment, occupational mobility, timing of retirement, and financial need following retirement. Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Force Experience, Older Men's Cohort, the analysis employes ordinary least squares and logistic regression techniques. The major hypotheses tested were that: (1) late-life unemployment leads to a long term reduction in status and income, (2) late-life unemployment and declines in occupational status reduce the age of retirement, and (3) late-life unemployment and declines in occupational status increase income needs following retirement. The findings concerning the effects of unemployment were consistent and strong for the white men in the sample. Unemployment led to reduced occupational status and income even at the end of men's careers. For the most part, men with recent unemployment experiences had higher probabilities of retirement in their early 60's. In addition, following retirement, such men showed a substantially greater probability of receiving public assistance income. Contrary to the hypothesis, men with unemployment showed a much lower probability of working after they retired, probably as a result of negative labor force experiences preceding retirement. The hypothesized effects of changes in status were not supported by this analysis with the sole exception that men with pre-retirement increases in status were found much less likely to work following retirement and, conversely, those with decreases in status were more likely to work. Reasons suggested for the lack of support of this aspect of the hypotheses were methodological and substantive. None of the hypotheses were supported for the population of older black men. These men were starting out in much less advantageous positions with respect to income, status, and unemployment experiences, suggesting floor effects operating on the observed behaviors. The policy implications discussed in conclusion suggested the need for much greater attention to the interplay among manpower, income security, and retirement policies. In light of the aging of the population and rapidly changing employment conditions for older workers, attention must be paid to how these workers and their families are affected by conditions often beyond their control.
Bibliography Citation
Griffith, Jeanne Elaine. Unemployment, Occupational Mobility, and Retirement: A Survey of Policies and Experiences. Ph.D. Dissertation, Johns Hopkins University, 1984. DAI-A 45/11, p. 3457, May 1985.