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Author: Guo, Siying
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Guo, Siying
A Model of Religious Involvement, Family Processes, Self-Control, and Juvenile Delinquency in Two-Parent Families
Journal of Adolescence 63 (February 2018): 175-190.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140197117302154
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Family Process Measures; Parental Influences; Parenting Skills/Styles; Religious Influences; Self-Control/Self-Regulation

Family processes, adolescent religious involvement, and self-control may serve as important mechanisms that mediate the relationship between parental religious involvement and delinquency. However, at present no study has systematically investigated the relationships among these factors and how these mediating mechanisms work. To address this gap, path analyses are conducted to test the hypothesized pathways whereby parental religious involvement operates to discourage delinquent behaviors of offspring. The study variables are taken from three waves of the study of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and its descendent NLSY79 Child and Young Adults at two year intervals (2000, 2002, and 2004). 1020 American adolescents who are 10-14 years old in 2002 are selected for final analyses. The findings suggest that parental religious involvement does not affect adolescent delinquency four years later directly, but indirectly through its influence on adolescent religious involvement, parenting practices, inter-parental conflict, and their interactions with adolescent self-control.
Bibliography Citation
Guo, Siying. "A Model of Religious Involvement, Family Processes, Self-Control, and Juvenile Delinquency in Two-Parent Families." Journal of Adolescence 63 (February 2018): 175-190.
2. Guo, Siying
Metcalfe, Christi
Religion as a Social Control: A Longitudinal Study of Religious Involvement and Substance Use
Crime and Delinquency published online (18 July 2018): DOI: 10.1177/0011128718787510.
Also: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0011128718787510
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Modeling, Random Effects; Religion; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The study examines the longitudinal relationship between religious involvement and substance use within emerging adulthood, accounting for changes in religious involvement over time and exploring variations across age, sex, race/ethnicity, and substance (i.e., alcohol, marijuana, and hard drugs). To this end, random effects models are used focusing on 11 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997. The findings demonstrate that increases in religious attendance are associated with reduced odds of all forms of substance use. In addition, the religious attendance-substance use relationship becomes weaker with age. Overall, religious attendance has a similar relationship with substance use among males and females, as well as Whites and non-Whites, with a few notable exceptions.
Bibliography Citation
Guo, Siying and Christi Metcalfe. "Religion as a Social Control: A Longitudinal Study of Religious Involvement and Substance Use." Crime and Delinquency published online (18 July 2018): DOI: 10.1177/0011128718787510.