Search Results

Author: Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Resulting in 21 citations.
1. Boynton-Jarrett, Renée
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Zuckerman, Barry
Turbulent Times: Effects of Turbulence and Violence Exposure in Adolescence on High School Completion, Health Risk Behavior, and Mental Health in Young Adulthood
Social Science and Medicine 95 (October 2013): 77-86.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953612006703
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Family Structure; Health, Mental; High School Completion/Graduates; Home Environment; Life Course; Mobility, Residential; Risk-Taking; Social Environment; Turbulence

Turbulent social environments are associated with health and developmental risk, yet mechanisms have been understudied. Guided by a life course framework and stress theory, this study examined the association between turbulent life transitions (including frequent residential mobility, school transitions, family structure disruptions, and homelessness) and exposure to violence during adolescence and high school completion, mental health, and health risk behaviors in young adulthood. Participants (n = 4834) from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort were followed prospectively from age 12–14 years for 10 years. We used structural equation models to investigate pathways between turbulence and cumulative exposure to violence (CEV), and high school completion, mental health, and health risk behaviors, while accounting for early life socio-demographics, family processes, and individual characteristics. Results indicated that turbulence index was associated with cumulative exposure to violence in adolescence. Both turbulence index and cumulative exposure to violence were positively associated with higher health risk behavior, poorer mental health, and inversely associated with high school completion. These findings highlight the importance of considering the cumulative impact of turbulent and adverse social environments when developing interventions to optimize health and developmental trajectory for adolescents transitioning into adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Boynton-Jarrett, Renée, Elizabeth Catherine Hair and Barry Zuckerman. "Turbulent Times: Effects of Turbulence and Violence Exposure in Adolescence on High School Completion, Health Risk Behavior, and Mental Health in Young Adulthood." Social Science and Medicine 95 (October 2013): 77-86.
2. Day, Randal D.
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Price, Jessica L. Smith
Orthner, Dennis K.
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Kaye, Kelleen
Family Processes and Adolescent Religiosity and Religious Practice: View from the NLSY97
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 289-309.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902735109
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Parent-Child Interaction; Parental Marital Status; Religion; Religious Influences

This article focuses on family processes and adolescent religious attendance and personal religiosity. We find that the closeness and quality of the marital relationship and relationship between adolescent and parents significantly contributes to the strength of adolescent religious conviction and practice. The study used data from the NLSY97 cohort. Predictors include parenting style, closeness, and parent--child closeness; family structure; income, employment, parental education, mother's age at first birth, and number of siblings; adolescent characteristics (e.g., age, gender, race/ethnicity, disability, lying or cheating); and environmental characteristics (e.g., region of country, urbanicity, and physical environment risk). Family religious attendance was dramatically influenced by race in adolescents aged 16 years. Adolescents living with married, biological parents in 1997 were 36% more likely to attend worship services than those living with stepfamilies. Adolescents living in more physically risky environments, with peers who belonged to gangs, cut classes, or had sex, were less likely to attend weekly worship services with their families. Finally, compared with adolescents whose parents had a high-quality marital relationship and who had good relationships with both parents, all other adolescents were less likely to attend weekly worship services with their families.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Day, Randal D., Hinckley A. Jones-Sanpei, Jessica L. Smith Price, Dennis K. Orthner, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Kristin Anderson Moore and Kelleen Kaye. "Family Processes and Adolescent Religiosity and Religious Practice: View from the NLSY97." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 289-309.
3. Day, Randal D.
Kaye, Kelleen
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Exploring Family Processes in the NLSY97
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009):109-115.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902735364
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Family Process Measures; Family Studies

This article introduces a special edition of Marriage and Family Review. We comment on how this collection emerged and was funded. A theoretical foundation for the articles is also presented. Finally, a short description of each article is included. The overall conclusion of the article is that the NLSY97 is a significant and important starting point for researching inner family life and family process variables. However, the authors note that large-scale research projects are needed within which family processes are the focus and not a sidelight.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Day, Randal D., Kelleen Kaye, Elizabeth Catherine Hair and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Exploring Family Processes in the NLSY97." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009):109-115.
4. Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Parent-Teen Relationship As Associated With Youth Outcomes: Differences Based on Family Income
Presented: Baltimore, MD, Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, March 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA)
Keyword(s): Income; Income Level; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Garrett, Sarah Bracey, Elizabeth Catherine Hair and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Parent-Teen Relationship As Associated With Youth Outcomes: Differences Based on Family Income." Presented: Baltimore, MD, Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, March 2004.
5. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Engagement in Criminal Activity from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Role of Protective Factors
Presented: Chicago IL, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Education; Family Influences; Modeling, Latent Class Analysis/Latent Transition Analysis; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper will present findings that examine the protective factors influencing the successful transition of adolescents who committed crimes in their youth to non-participation in criminal activity as adults using data from the NLSY97. The 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) is a nationally representative longitudinal dataset of individuals born between 1980 - 1984 who were living in a U.S. household in 1997. Latent Profile Analysis will be performed during adolescence and young adulthood. We anticipate the emergence of 3-4 groups or ‘profiles’ of adolescents and adults who range in the frequency and severity of criminal/delinquent behavior. We will also examine the movement in ‘profile’ membership from youth engagement in delinquent activities to adult participation in criminal activities. We will also examine whether protective factors such as education, employment, health, environmental, and family characteristics influence membership in the profiles during adolescence and young adulthood. We will also examine how risk and protective factors during adolescences and young adulthood influence the patterns of movement as youth transition to adulthood and either persist, desist, or completely abstain from participation in criminal activity. Findings will be discussed in terms of positive youth development.
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine. "Engagement in Criminal Activity from Adolescence to Young Adulthood: The Role of Protective Factors." Presented: Chicago IL, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, 2012.
6. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Hadley, Alena M.
Kaye, Kelleen
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Health Outcomes
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 218-248.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733500
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children, Home Environment; Children, Mental Health; Children, Well-Being; Marital Disruption; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Religious Influences; Substance Use; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Although a number of studies examined the implications of marital disruption for adolescent well-being, few studied the implications of marital relationship quality on health outcomes for children in married-couple families. The present study examines how parent marital quality among intact families interacts with the quality of parent-adolescent relationships to predict physical health, mental health, and substance use in middle adolescence and early adulthood. The study uses data from the NLSY97 cohort, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood. Predictors include the quality of the parent marital relationship, the quality of the parent-adolescent relationship, marital structure, and a number of contextual covariates and control variables. Combined parent marital quality and parent-adolescent relationship groups were developed using latent class analyses and were used to predict positive and negative health behaviors during the teen and early adult years. Results indicate that adolescents in families experiencing poor marital quality fared worse on physical health, mental health, and substance use outcomes. In addition, adolescents who reported poor relationships with at least one of their parents fared worse on outcomes. Adolescents whose parents have low-quality relationships and also have poor parent-adolescent relationships tended to fare least well across health measures. Adolescents whose parents have a high-quality relationship and who have a good parent-adolescent relationship with both parents consistently had the best outcomes. Overall, poor relationships consistently undermine mental health, physical health, and substance use. Family religious activities also consistently predict better health outcomes. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Alena M. Hadley, Kelleen Kaye, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Health Outcomes." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 218-248.
7. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Kinukawa, Akemi
Lippman, Laura
Michelson, E.
The Parent-Adolescent Relationship Scale
In: What Do Children Need to Flourish? Conceptualizing and Measuring Indicators of Positive Development, The Search Institute Series on Developmentally Attentive Community and Society, Volume 3. K. Moore and L. Lippman, eds., New York: Springer, 2005: 183-202
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Scale Construction; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Papers presented at a conference held in Washington, D.C. in March 2003. Includes bibliographical references and index. This volume, part of the Search Series on Developmentally Attentive Community and Society, focuses on how scholars and practitioners can begin to build rigorous measures of the positive behaviors and attitudes that result in positive outcomes for children and youth. The volume is presented in five parts:
- Introduction and conceptual framework
- Positive formation of the self-character, values, spirituality, life satisfaction, hope, and ethnic identity
- Healthy habits, positive behaviors, and time use
- Positive relationships with parents and siblings
- Positive attitudes and behaviors toward learning and school environments
- Enacting positive values and behaviors in communities

Table of Contents
Introduction and Conceptual Framework.- The Values in Action Inventory of Character Strengths for Youth.- Adolescent Spirituality.- Children’s Life Satisfaction.- Measuring Hope in Children.- The Ethnic Identify Scale.- Leisure Time Activities in Middle Childhood.- Healthy Habits among Adolescents: Sleep, Exercise, Diet, and Body Image.- Adolescent Participation in Organized Activities.- Positive Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Functioning: An Assessment of Measures among Adolescents.- A Scale of Positive Social Behaviors.- The Parent-Adolescent Relationship Scale.- Positive Indicators of Sibling Relationship Quality: The Sibling Inventory of Behavior.- The Patterns of Adaptive Learning Survey.- Ability Self-Perceptions and Subjective Task Values in Adolescents and Children.- Assessing Academic Self-regulated Learning.- Identifying Adaptive Classrooms: Dimensions of the Classroom Social Environment.- Connection to School.- School Engagement.- Community-Based Civic Engagement.- Prosocial Orientation and Community service.- Frugality, Generosity, and Materialism in Children and Adolescents.
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Sarah Bracey Garrett, Akemi Kinukawa, Laura Lippman and E. Michelson. "The Parent-Adolescent Relationship Scale" In: What Do Children Need to Flourish? Conceptualizing and Measuring Indicators of Positive Development, The Search Institute Series on Developmentally Attentive Community and Society, Volume 3. K. Moore and L. Lippman, eds., New York: Springer, 2005: 183-202
8. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Ling, Thomson J.
Cleveland, Kevin
The Continued Importance of Quality Parent–Adolescent Relationships During Late Adolescence
Journal of Research on Adolescence 18,1 (March 2008): 187-200.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2008.00556.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Attrition; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Health Factors; Health, Mental; Parent Supervision/Monitoring; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Well-Being

The quality of adolescents' relationships with residential parents has been found to predict many different health and behavioral youth outcomes; strong associations have also been found between these outcomes and family processes, and between relationship quality and family processes. Data from Rounds 1–5 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 were used to examine hypotheses about the influence of the parent–adolescent relationship on subsequent adolescent mental well-being and delinquency, as mediated by family processes. Using structural equation modeling, we found that the influence of a positive residential parent–adolescent relationship on better mental well-being and fewer delinquency was entirely mediated by family routines, parental monitoring, and parental supportiveness, net of sociodemographic controls. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Research on Adolescence (Blackwell Publishing Limited) is the property of Blackwell Publishing Limited and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts)

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Sarah Bracey Garrett, Thomson J. Ling and Kevin Cleveland. "The Continued Importance of Quality Parent–Adolescent Relationships During Late Adolescence." Journal of Research on Adolescence 18,1 (March 2008): 187-200.
9. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hadley, Alena M.
Kaye, Kelleen
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Profiles of Relationship Quality
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 189-217.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733500
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Divorce; Fathers and Children; Marital Conflict; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Marital Status

Rigorous studies repeatedly have demonstrated the negative effects of parental divorce on outcomes for families. However, very few studies have examined the quality of the marital relationship within intact families or how the quality of the marital relationship interacts with the quality of the parent--adolescent relationship. The present study examines how aspects of parent marital quality, such as marital support and conflict between the couple, existed within married families and examines how patterns of mother--adolescent and father--adolescent relationships quality varied longitudinally from 1997 to 1999. The study uses data from the NLSY97 cohort, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood. Four profiles of parent marital quality were developed using latent class analyses. Four growth profiles for the mother--adolescent relationship and for the father--adolescent relationship were created using latent growth class analysis in Mplus.

To examine how the parent marital quality profiles and the parent--adolescent relationship quality interact, we examined how they overlapped. Six distinct groups were evident from this examination: (1) high marital quality and good relationships with both parents, (2) high marital quality and a good relationship with only one parent, (3) high support and high conflict marital quality and a good relationship with at least one parent, (4) low marital quality and a good relationship with at least one parent, (5) high marital quality and bad relationships with both parents, and (6) low marital quality and bad relationships with both parents.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Alena M. Hadley, Kelleen Kaye, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Parent Marital Quality and the Parent-Adolescent Relationship: Profiles of Relationship Quality." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 189-217.
10. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Kaye, Kelleen
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Marital Quality and Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Components of Relationship Strengths in Married Couple Families
ASPE Research Brief, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), January 2009.
Also: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/08/RelationshipStrengths/Components/rb.shtml
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Divorce; Families, Two-Parent; Marital Dissolution; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Marital Status; Transition, Adulthood

OVERVIEW
Due to sharp increases in the divorce rate and the increasing numbers of unmarried couples cohabitating in the United States, numerous research studies have examined the effects of marital dissolution on children. However, in 2006 nearly 50 million children were living with two, married parents, about two-thirds of all children in the country.

The purpose of this research brief is to explain the relationship context of adolescents who live in married couple families. Specifically, we assess the marital quality of the adolescents’ biological parents (and step-parents) by examining how supportive and conflict behaviors combine within the couple relationship. We also examine how support and conflict operate in parent-adolescent relationships. These separate measures of couple and parent-adolescent relationships are then combine[d] to form new categories that describe the relationship context within which adolescents transition into young adulthood.

The overall goal of the research is to determine whether marital quality and parent-adolescent relationships are associated with particular outcomes for adolescents. This analysis is unique in that it relies on the perceptions of parent marital and parent-adolescent relationship quality from the adolescents’ perspective. Additionally, this study uses a nationally representative data set to examine these couple and parent-adolescent relationships.

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Kelleen Kaye, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Marital Quality and Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Components of Relationship Strengths in Married Couple Families." ASPE Research Brief, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), January 2009.
11. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Kaye, Kelleen
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Marital Quality and Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Well-Being
ASPE Research Brief, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), January 2009.
Also: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/08/RelationshipStrengths/Well-Being/rb.shtml
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; Educational Outcomes; Families, Two-Parent; Health Factors; Health, Mental; Marital Dissolution; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Religious Influences; Sexual Activity; Substance Use; Transition, Adulthood

OVERVIEW
While a number of studies have examined the effects of marital disruption on adolescent well-being, few have studied the implications of marital conflict and relationship quality for child well-being in married-couple families. This represents an important gap in the research, since most children live in married couple families. The present study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort (NLSY97), a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood to examine how parent marital quality among intact families interacts with the quality of the parent-adolescent relationships to predict physical health, mental health, substance use, sexual activity, religious activity, and educational outcomes in middle adolescence and early adulthood. Results indicate that adolescents whose parents have a high quality relationship and who have a good parent-adolescent relationship with both parents consistently had the best outcomes. Ironically, these types of parent/child situations are among the least studied.

SUMMARY
This study of adolescents in married couple families finds that the combined nature of parent marital quality and parent-youth relationships affect physical health, mental health, and substance abuse outcomes for youth in middle adolescence and, to a lesser extent, early adulthood. Specifically, among adolescents in married-couple families, those whose parents experienced marital discord and poor parent-adolescent relationships during their early adolescent years fare worse on a range of indicators of physical health, mental health, substance use, sexual activity, religious activity, and education outcomes. Furthermore, this research offers preliminary evidence that both parental marital quality and positive parent-adolescent relationships are important to well-being outcomes later in adolescence and extending in some cases even into early adulthood.

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Kelleen Kaye, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Marital Quality and Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Well-Being." ASPE Research Brief, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), January 2009.
12. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Ling, Thomson J.
McPhee-Baker, Cameron
Brown, Brett V.
Youth Who Are "Disconnected" and Those Who Then Reconnect: Assessing the Influence of Family, Programs, Peers and Communities
Publication #2009-37, Child Trends Research Brief, July 2009.
Also: http://www.childtrends.org/files/child_trends-2009_07_22_rb_disconnectedyouth.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Disadvantaged, Economically; Disconnected Youth; Health Factors; Job Training; Support Networks; Transition, Adulthood; Transition, School to Work; Vocational Education; Vocational Training; Youth Problems

Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Kristin Anderson Moore, Thomson J. Ling, Cameron McPhee-Baker and Brett V. Brown. "Youth Who Are "Disconnected" and Those Who Then Reconnect: Assessing the Influence of Family, Programs, Peers and Communities." Publication #2009-37, Child Trends Research Brief, July 2009.
13. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Park, M. Jane
Ling, Thomson J.
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Risky Behaviors in Late Adolescence: Co-Occurrence, Predictors, and Consequences
Journal of Adolescent Health 45,3 (September 2009): 253-261.
Also: http://www.jahonline.org/article/S1054-139X%2809%2900111-6/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adolescent Sexual Activity; Behavioral Problems; Family Characteristics; Family Environment; Risk-Taking; Well-Being

PURPOSE: Advances in research have broadened our understanding of the risky behaviors that significantly threaten adolescent health and well-being. Advances include: using person-centered, rather than behavior-centered approaches to examine how behaviors co-occur; greater focus on how environmental factors, such as family, or peer-level characteristics, influence behavior; and examination of how behaviors affect well-being in young adulthood. Use of nationally representative, longitudinal data would expand research on these critical relationships. METHODS: Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed over time, the present study: (1) identifies profiles of risky behaviors, (2) investigates how environmental characteristics predict these profiles of risky behaviors (e.g., delinquency, smoking, drug use, drinking, sexual behavior, and exercise), and (3) examines how these profiles of risky behaviors relate to positive and negative youth outcomes. RESULTS: Four "risk profiles" were identified: a high-risk group (those who report high levels of participation in numerous behaviors), a low-risk group (those who engage in very few risky behaviors), and two moderate risk-taking groups. We found that profiles with any negative behaviors were predictive of negative outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: It is important for practitioners to examine health behaviors in multiple domains concurrently rather than individually in isolation. Interventions and research should not simply target adolescents engaging in high levels of risky behavior but also adolescents who are engaging in lower levels of risky behavior.
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, M. Jane Park, Thomson J. Ling and Kristin Anderson Moore. "Risky Behaviors in Late Adolescence: Co-Occurrence, Predictors, and Consequences." Journal of Adolescent Health 45,3 (September 2009): 253-261.
14. Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Scott, Elizabeth
McPhee, Cameron
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Brown, Brett V.
Kinukawa, Akemi
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Disconnected Youth: The Influence of Family, Programs, Peers, and Communities on Becoming Disconnected and on Re-Connecting
Child Trends Report Prepared for the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation. Washington, DC, October 2005.
Also: http://www.teenfutures.net/sites/default/files/resources/Disconnected%20Youth%20Report.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Demography; Disconnected Youth; Family Influences; Health Factors; Poverty; Racial Differences; School Dropouts; Transition, Adulthood; Unemployment, Youth; Work Attachment; Youth Problems

Introduction: The transition to adulthood has many bumps in the road. However, for some youth, this transition is especially difficult. Such youth may become disengaged from the worlds of school and work for a lengthy period of time. These youth are often referred to as disconnected. In this research brief, we analyze newly available data that allow us to track for four years the experiences of youth ages 12 to 16 in 1997.
Bibliography Citation
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine, Elizabeth Scott, Cameron McPhee, Kristin Anderson Moore, Brett V. Brown, Akemi Kinukawa and Sarah Bracey Garrett. "Disconnected Youth: The Influence of Family, Programs, Peers, and Communities on Becoming Disconnected and on Re-Connecting." Child Trends Report Prepared for the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation. Washington, DC, October 2005.
15. Kaye, Kelleen
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Hadley, Alena M.
Day, Randal D.
Orthner, Dennis K.
Parent Marital Quality and the Parent–Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Sexual Activity among Adolescents and Youth
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 270-288.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733641
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Marital Stability; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Marital Status; Religious Influences; Risk-Taking; Teenagers; Variables, Independent - Covariate

The link between growing up outside of an intact family and the likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behaviors as an adolescent has been explored extensively. However, fewer studies examined the likelihood of risky sexual behaviors among adolescents within intact families and what elements of those married-parent families seem to function as protective factors for adolescents. This study looks at relationships within married-parent families—that is, the parent marital relationship, the youth-parent relationship, and the interaction of the two—to identify potential sources of resilience for adolescents that influence their sexual activity. Overall, the youths' relationship with their parents matters more than the parents' relationship with each other, particularly for male youth and youth in stepparent families. Other covariates with notable influence on youths' risky sexual behaviors include parents' marital disruption and religious activity during the teen years. Analyses are based on data from the NLSY97 cohort.

Copyright of Marriage & Family Review is the property of Haworth Press and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Kaye, Kelleen, Kristin Anderson Moore, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Alena M. Hadley, Randal D. Day and Dennis K. Orthner. "Parent Marital Quality and the Parent–Adolescent Relationship: Effects on Sexual Activity among Adolescents and Youth ." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 270-288.
16. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Guzman, Lina
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Lippman, Laura
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Parent-Teen Relationships and Interactions: Far More Positive Than Not
Publication # 2004-25, Child Trends Research Brief, Child Trends Inc, December 2004.
Also: http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Parent_TeenRB.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Child Trends, Inc.
Keyword(s): Children, Well-Being; Health, Mental; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness

ED484689
This Research Brief brings together recent results of a nationally representative survey of U.S. teens about the nature of their relationships with their parents and findings from rigorous research studies on the parent-adolescent bond. The evidence presented shows that while the proportion of teens reporting positive relationships with their parents does dip somewhat during the early teen years and while this proportion is lower for parents who live apart from their children, adolescents, in general, respect, admire, and like their parents and enjoy spending time with them. These results from interviews with teens dovetail with research showing the link between the quality of parent-child relationships and a wide range of positive outcomes for teens. Moreover, this research is reinforced by similar findings in industrialized countries elsewhere in the world, which are also reported on in this brief.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Lina Guzman, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Laura Lippman and Sarah Bracey Garrett. "Parent-Teen Relationships and Interactions: Far More Positive Than Not." Publication # 2004-25, Child Trends Research Brief, Child Trends Inc, December 2004.
17. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Parent Religious Beliefs and Adolescent Outcomes
Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences; Parents, Behavior; Religion; Religious Influences; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Attendance at religious services has been examined frequently in studies of adolescent development and is generally found correlated with more positive outcomes. However, little empirical work has been done to examine the factors that explain these correlations. Using measures of religious belief designed at Child Trends and included in the 1997 panel of the new National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we estimate multivariate models to explore the relative importance of family religious attendance compared with parental religious beliefs, family socioeconomic status, demographic characteristics, and parenting practices. Measures of religious belief include the importance of religious belief, prayer, and the degree to which they believe that the scriptures of their faith should be interpreted literally. Child outcomes include measures of the parent-child relationship and measures of adolescent substance use and delinquency.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson and Elizabeth Catherine Hair. "Parent Religious Beliefs and Adolescent Outcomes." Presented: Atlanta, GA, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, May 2002.
18. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Patterns and Implications of Step-Parents/Adolescent Relationships
Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 2001
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Adoption; Cohabitation; Family Characteristics; Family Circumstances, Changes in; Family Formation; Family Structure; Family Studies; Parents, Non-Custodial

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Increased marital dissolution and non-marital childbearing have resulted in high proportions of American children who live with step-parents during their adolescent years. The new National Longitudinal Survey of Youth - 1997 (NLS97) panel, a nationally representative sample of 9,022 adolescents aged 12-16 in 1997, includes rich information on parent-adolescent relationships as well as on the parent's marital history. We address several questions: What are the within-group residential and marital history patterns of step-parent?; What are the implications of these different residential histories for adolescent/ step-parent relationships and for adolescent problem behaviors? While most adolescents live with two bio parents, large numbers live with non-adoptive step-parents, adoptive step-parents, and a parent's boy/girlfriend. Adolescents report feeling closer to residential bio parents and describe these parents as more supportive. Residential bio parents also monitor the adolescents more and the adolescents report fewer behavior problems and less substance use.
Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson and Elizabeth Catherine Hair. "Patterns and Implications of Step-Parents/Adolescent Relationships." Presented: Washington, DC, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 2001.
19. Moore, Kristin Anderson
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Garrett, Sarah Bracey
Into Adulthood: The Continued Importance of Quality Parent-Adolescent Relationships
Presented: Baltimore, MD, Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, March 2004
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA)
Keyword(s): Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Moore, Kristin Anderson, Elizabeth Catherine Hair and Sarah Bracey Garrett. "Into Adulthood: The Continued Importance of Quality Parent-Adolescent Relationships." Presented: Baltimore, MD, Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence, March 2004.
20. Mumford, Elizabeth A.
Liu, Weiwei
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Yu, Tzy-Chyi
Concurrent Trajectories of BMI and Mental Health Patterns in Emerging Adulthood
Social Science and Medicine 98 (December 2013): 1-7.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953613005017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Health, Mental; Obesity; Poverty

Affective disorders and weight status have been consistently linked in childhood and adult research, and this comorbidity has synergistic effects leading to more severe health consequences. We map the co-development of these developmental processes in the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – 1997 (NLSY97) cohort ages 15 to 27 to inform the targeting of public health interventions. We estimate profiles of youth mental health and weight status through parallel process growth mixture modeling within a person-centered framework controlling for race/ethnicity, gender, and poverty status. Fit statistics indicate a 5-class parallel process model for the concurrent trajectories of BMI and mental health. The concurrent trajectories model reveals latent class trajectories of "stable normal weight, stable good mental health" (82.2%); "consistently obese, stable good mental health" (6.8%); "overweight becoming obese, declining mental health" (5.6%); "stable normal weight, improving mental health" (3.3%); and "morbid obesity, stable good mental health" (2.1%). The risk of developmental trajectories of poor mental health and BMI outcomes is greater for females, blacks, Hispanics, and individuals living below the poverty line. These results should help public health professionals to better target subpopulations approaching or already experiencing developmental pathways of risk for poor mental health and weight comorbidities. Multilevel investigation of lifestyle and contextual factors will foster further refinement of public health interventions.
Bibliography Citation
Mumford, Elizabeth A., Weiwei Liu, Elizabeth Catherine Hair and Tzy-Chyi Yu. "Concurrent Trajectories of BMI and Mental Health Patterns in Emerging Adulthood." Social Science and Medicine 98 (December 2013): 1-7.
21. Orthner, Dennis K.
Jones-Sanpei, Hinckley A.
Hair, Elizabeth Catherine
Moore, Kristin Anderson
Day, Randal D.
Kaye, Kelleen
Marital and Parental Relationship Quality and Educational Outcomes for Youth
Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 249-269.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01494920902733617
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Haworth Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Educational Attainment; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Human Capital; Marital Satisfaction/Quality; Marriage; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parenthood

This research examines the effects of parental marital quality and the quality of the parent--child relationship on the educational progress of adolescents. Previous research indicates that family structure and economic capacity have significant effects on educational achievement and high school graduation rates. Few studies, however, examined the effects of the quality of the parental relationship on the educational outcomes of their children. This study is built on bioecological and social capital theories of human development suggesting that the capacity for child and youth development is enhanced when their primary relationships are supportive and provide them with social assets that encourage human capital development. The study uses data from the NLSY97, a nationally representative sample of adolescents who are being followed into adulthood.

The findings indicate that family stability and living with two biological parents is a stronger predictor of high school graduation than parent marital quality and the quality of the parent--child relationship. But the data also indicate that parent marital quality and the quality of the parent--child relationship have a strong and positive effect on postsecondary education access among those who do graduate from high school. These findings are interpreted in light of the contribution of relationship quality to further educational involvement and the implications this has for workforce development and successful labor force competition in a global economy.

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Bibliography Citation
Orthner, Dennis K., Hinckley A. Jones-Sanpei, Elizabeth Catherine Hair, Kristin Anderson Moore, Randal D. Day and Kelleen Kaye. "Marital and Parental Relationship Quality and Educational Outcomes for Youth." Marriage and Family Review 45,2-3 (April 2009): 249-269.