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Author: He, Qian
Resulting in 1 citation.
1. He, Qian
Heterogeneous Effects of Employment Instability on Transitions to First-time Homeownership: Evidence from NLSY79 Cohort
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Employment, History; Employment, Intermittent; Employment, Part-Time; Gender Differences; Home Ownership; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

As one of the key financial decisions for young adult households, buying the first home marks establishing a stable household and achieving socioeconomic maturity, with or without parental sponsorship. Do people generally hold this decision until they settle down on a stable career? If so, how? This article examines the relationships between various sources of employment uncertainties and patterns of transitioning to first-time homeownership, as well as how the relationships vary by gender and educational attainment. Results from discrete event history analysis on the NLSY79 cohort suggest that career instability does deter young adults' transitions to first-time homeownership. This relationship, first of all, varies by employment sector. The self-employed are at salient advantages in gaining home ownership, compared to private-sector employees. Second, this relationship also varies by standard versus nonstandard employment categories. Those who work part-time or part-year (i.e. nonstandard employment) are substantially less likely to buy their own home than those who are employed full-time, full-year. Third, employer tenure positively predicts first-time home purchases. Fourth, however, career impacts on individuals' chances of becoming homeowners are gendered: nonstandard employment hurts men's homeownership transitions, and by contrast, precipitates women's. Fifth, educational attainment does not apparently moderate the relationship between employment precariousness and first-home acquisition. Lastly, although no interactions between parental background and adult children's employment situations are found in predicting young adults' home ownership outcomes, children from more privileged families tend to become homeowners later than counterparts from less privileged families, probably due to the former's lengthened educational career.
Bibliography Citation
He, Qian. "Heterogeneous Effects of Employment Instability on Transitions to First-time Homeownership: Evidence from NLSY79 Cohort." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.