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Author: Hines, Caitlin
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Hines, Caitlin
Ryan, Rebecca M.
Early Childhood WIC Use and Children's School Readiness
Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Well-Being; Cognitive Development; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Program Participation/Evaluation; School Entry/Readiness; Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly Food Stamps)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The goal of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is to support the health and well-being of low-income women, infants, and children by providing pregnant women and children up to five years old with access to nutritious food. While the health benefits of WIC for young children have been well studied (Cole & Fox, 2008; Mackey-Bilaver, 2007), its potential non-health benefits, including improvements in children's early cognitive and socio-emotional wellbeing, have been practically unexplored. The one study to examine non-health outcomes found that prenatal WIC exposure predicted better cognitive outcomes at age 2 and educational outcomes at age 11 (Jackson, 2015). The goal of the present study is to expand that work by examining associations between WIC during early childhood (ages 0 - 5) and a broad set of cognitive and behavioral outcomes at school entry, between ages 5 and 7.
Bibliography Citation
Hines, Caitlin and Rebecca M. Ryan. "Early Childhood WIC Use and Children's School Readiness." Presented: Washington DC, Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Annual Fall Research Conference, November 2018.
2. Ryan, Rebecca M.
Padilla, Christina
Hines, Caitlin
Differential Parenting of Biologically Vulnerable Versus Nonvulnerable Children By Socioeconomic Status
Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Children, Temperament; Parental Investments; Parenting Skills/Styles; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

It is well-established that socioeconomic (SES) disadvantage and biological vulnerability contribute to SES-based gaps in children's school readiness. The proposed study will investigate one way in which these two disadvantages may jointly exacerbate these early gaps: low-SES parents may invest fewer resources in vulnerable children, whereas high-SES parents may invest equally or more in them. Unlike prior research, the study focuses on investment during early childhood and examines two biological vulnerabilities: low birth weight (LBW) and difficult temperament. Investments are compared among siblings to minimize the influence of family-specific characteristics that might bias associations, drawing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-Maternal and Child Supplement. Results indicate that low-SES parents are less cognitively stimulating with LBW infants, whereas higher-SES parents are not, but that parents across SES are less stimulating with difficult versus average temperament children and are more likely to report spanking them in infancy.
Bibliography Citation
Ryan, Rebecca M., Christina Padilla and Caitlin Hines. "Differential Parenting of Biologically Vulnerable Versus Nonvulnerable Children By Socioeconomic Status." Presented: Chicago IL, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2017.