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Author: Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Chen, Yanni
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
An Economic Analysis of the Impact of Food Prices and Other Factors on Adult Lifestyles: Choices of Physical Activity and Healthy Weight
Presented: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 2009, AAEA & ACCI Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-29, 2009.
Also: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/49291/2/HealthAAEA053009compla.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (AAEA)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Family Income; Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Probit; Obesity; State-Level Data/Policy; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines women's and men's decisions to participate in physical activity and to attain a healthy weight. These outcomes are hypothesized to be related to prices of food, drink and health care services and products, the respondent's personal characteristics (such as education, reading food labels (signaling a concern for good health), adjusted family income, opportunity cost of time, occupation, marital status, race and ethnicity) and his or her BMI at age 25. These decisions are represented by a trivariate probit model that is fitted to data for adults in the NLSY79 panel with geocodes that have been augmented with local area food, drink and health care prices. Separate analyses are undertaken for men and women due to basic physiological differences. Results include: Women and men who read food labels are more likely to participate in moderate and vigorous physical exercise, and women are less likely to be obese. Women with more education are more likely to be obese but educated men are less likely to be obesity. Higher prices for fresh fruits and vegetables and non-alcoholic drinks increase likelihood of obesity for females but not for males; and a higher price for processed fruits and vegetables reduce likelihood of obesity for females but not for males. A larger BMI at age 25 has wage effects later in life and also increases the probability of being obese.
Bibliography Citation
Chen, Yanni and Wallace Edgar Huffman. "An Economic Analysis of the Impact of Food Prices and Other Factors on Adult Lifestyles: Choices of Physical Activity and Healthy Weight." Presented: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association 2009, AAEA & ACCI Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-29, 2009.
2. Huang, Ying
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Life Cycle Models of Women's BMI and Probability of Being Obese: Evidence from Panel Data
Agricultural Economics published online (27 May 2019): DOI: 10.1111/agec.12506.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/agec.12506
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Life Cycle Research; Obesity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The objective of this paper is to develop a multi‐period, finite‐life, life cycle models of household decisions on food, leisure, and health (body mass index or being obese), and to estimate econometric versions of these models treating SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) participation as endogenous. A key insight from the economic models is that households allocate their wealth over the multi‐period life cycle to equalize the marginal utility of wealth in each period. The observations for this study are a balanced‐panel of over 1,600 women from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (NLSY79). We focus on the 20‐year period starting in 1986, when SNAP data first became available. Women of all ages are included in the study because at the beginning of adulthood, women cannot accurately predict over their life cycle labor and marriage market and health shocks that can thrust them into an economic position where they would qualify for SNAP. New findings include that a woman's household SNAP participation with or without updating for last periods health status and higher local dairy product prices reduce significantly her BMI and probability of being obese.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Ying and Wallace Edgar Huffman. "Life Cycle Models of Women's BMI and Probability of Being Obese: Evidence from Panel Data." Agricultural Economics published online (27 May 2019): DOI: 10.1111/agec.12506.
3. Huang, Ying
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Tegene, Abebayehu
Impacts of Economic and Psychological Factors on Women’s Obesity and Food Assistance Program Participation: Evidence from the NLSY Panel
American Journal of Agricultural Economics 94, 2 (January 2012): 331-337.
Also: http://ajae.oxfordjournals.org/content/94/2/331.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Data Linkage (also see Record Linkage); Food Stamps (see Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program); Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors; Obesity; Regions; Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) (see Self-Esteem); Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Over the past thirty-five years, the U.S. adult obesity rate has more than doubled from roughly 15% to 35%, reflecting a general diffusion of obesity across all segments of the adult population (USDHHS). Obesity is a concern because it increases the risk for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and most forms of cancer, except for lung. Earlier studies of obesity of U.S. adults have largely focused on data in a single cross-section or one round of a panel survey. Chen and Huffman (2010) show that food and drink prices significantly affect U.S. women’s probability of being obese but not for men. However, the impact of individual food and drink prices are not always as expected.

© The Author (2011). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

Bibliography Citation
Huang, Ying, Wallace Edgar Huffman and Abebayehu Tegene. "Impacts of Economic and Psychological Factors on Women’s Obesity and Food Assistance Program Participation: Evidence from the NLSY Panel." American Journal of Agricultural Economics 94, 2 (January 2012): 331-337.
4. Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Chen, Yanni
An Economic Analysis of the Impact of Food Prices and Other Factors on Adult Lifestyles: Choices of Physical Activity and Healthy Weight
Presented: Beijing, China, Conference of Agricultural Economists (IAAE), 27th International, August 16-22, 2009.
Also: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/49291/2/HealthAAEA053009compla.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Association of Agricultural Economists (IAAE)
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Gender Differences; Geocoded Data; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Obesity; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper examines women's and men's decisions to participate in physical activity and to attain a healthy weight. These outcomes are hypothesized to be related to prices of food, drink and health care services and products, the respondent's personal characteristics (such as education, reading food labels, adjusted family income, opportunity cost of time, occupation, marital status, race and ethnicity) and his or her BMI at age 25. These decisions are represented by a trivariate probit model that is fitted to data for adults in the NLSY79 panel with geocodes that have been augmented with local area food, drink and health care prices. Separate analyses are undertaken for men and women due to basic physiological differences. Results include: Women and men who read food labels are more likely to participate in moderate and vigorous physical exercise, and women are less likely to be obese. Women with more education are more likely to be obese but educated men are less likely to be obesity. Higher prices for fresh fruits and vegetables and non-alcoholic drinks increase likelihood of obesity for females but not for males; and a higher price for processed fruits and vegetables reduce likelihood of obesity for females but not for males. A larger BMI at age 25 has wage effects later in life and also increases the probability of being obese.
Bibliography Citation
Huffman, Wallace Edgar and Yanni Chen. "An Economic Analysis of the Impact of Food Prices and Other Factors on Adult Lifestyles: Choices of Physical Activity and Healthy Weight." Presented: Beijing, China, Conference of Agricultural Economists (IAAE), 27th International, August 16-22, 2009.
5. Keng, Shao-Hsun
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People
Journal of Population Economics 20,1 (January 2007): 35-54.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/v044557798238035/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Income; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents a two-equation model of joint outcomes on an individual's decision to binge-drink and on his/her annual labor market earnings. The primary data source is the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979–1994. We show that binge-drinking behavior is quite alcohol-price responsive and is a rational addiction. A new result is that an individual's decision to binge-drink has a statistically significant negative effect on his/her earnings. Furthermore, we conducted simulations of the short-run and long-run impacts of increasing the alcohol price. They showed that that the tendency for an individual to binge-drink heavily is reduced significantly, and the reduction is greater in the long- than short-run simulation. Also, an individual's annual earnings were increased. However, in the structural model, an individual's earnings have no significant effect on his/her tendency to engage in binge drinking. Our results contradict earlier findings from cross-sectional evidence that showed increased alcohol consumption raised an individual's earnings or wages. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Keng, Shao-Hsun and Wallace Edgar Huffman. "Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People." Journal of Population Economics 20,1 (January 2007): 35-54.
6. Keng, Shao-Hsun
Huffman, Wallace Edgar
Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People
Journal of Population Economics 23,1 (January 2010): 303-322.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/pr751727668073n6/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Earnings; Income; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

[Editor's note: This paper appears to have been published twice by the Journal of Population Economics. See also, Journal of Population Economics, 20,1 (January 2007): 35-54, that appears in this bibliography.]

This paper presents a two-equation model of joint outcomes on an individual's decision to binge drink and on his/her annual labor market earnings. The primary data source is the 1979 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), 1979-1994. We show that binge drinking behavior is quite alcohol-price responsive and is a rational addiction. A new result is that an individual's decision to binge drink has a statistically significant negative effect on his/her earnings. Furthermore, we conducted simulations of the short-run and long-run impacts of increasing the alcohol price. They showed that the tendency for an individual to binge drink heavily is reduced significantly, and the reduction is greater in the long-run than short-run simulation. Also, an individual's annual earnings were increased. However, in the structural model, an individual's earnings have no significant effect on his/her tendency to engage in binge drinking. Our results contradict earlier findings from cross-section evidence that showed increased alcohol consumption raised an individual's earnings or wages. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Bibliography Citation
Keng, Shao-Hsun and Wallace Edgar Huffman. "Binge Drinking and Labor Market Success: A Longitudinal Study on Young People." Journal of Population Economics 23,1 (January 2010): 303-322.