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Author: Kahn, Joan R.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Kahn, Joan R.
Garcia-Manglano, Javier
Bianchi, Suzanne M.
The Motherhood Penalty at Midlife: Long-Term Effects of Children on Women's Careers
Journal of Marriage and Family 76,1 (February 2014): 56-72.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jomf.12086/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Inc. => Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Life Course; Maternal Employment; Motherhood; Occupational Status; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

The authors build on prior research on the motherhood wage penalty to examine whether the career penalties faced by mothers change over the life course. They broaden the focus beyond wages to also consider labor force participation and occupational status and use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women to model the changing impact of motherhood as women age from their 20s to their 50s (n = 4,730). They found that motherhood is “costly” to women's careers, but the effects on all 3 labor force outcomes attenuate at older ages. Children reduce women's labor force participation, but this effect is strongest when women are younger and is eliminated by the 40s and 50s. Mothers also seem able to regain ground in terms of occupational status. The wage penalty for having children varies by parity, persisting across the life course only for women who have 3 or more children.
Bibliography Citation
Kahn, Joan R., Javier Garcia-Manglano and Suzanne M. Bianchi. "The Motherhood Penalty at Midlife: Long-Term Effects of Children on Women's Careers." Journal of Marriage and Family 76,1 (February 2014): 56-72.
2. Kahn, Joan R.
Garcia-Manglano, Javier
Bianchi, Suzanne M.
The Motherhood Penalty at Midlife: The Long-Term Impact of Birth-Timing on Women’s Careers
Presented: Dallas TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2010
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): First Birth; Gender Attitudes/Roles; Life Course; Maternal Employment; Occupations; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A growing body of research has shown that mothers pay a significant wage penalty for having children, especially while their children are young. In this paper, we take a life course perspective to study the long-term impact of both the number and timing of births on women’s wages and occupations at midlife. We use data from the Young Women’s cohort of the National Longitudinal Study to examine the motherhood gap for women as they age through their forties and fifties. Our underlying question is whether the career penalty (especially for women with early first births) grows narrower or wider as women grow older. In addition to incorporating human capital measures reflecting accumulated work experience and training, we also consider the impact of women’s attitudes reflecting their preferences about gender roles, the value of work and the importance of the family.
Bibliography Citation
Kahn, Joan R., Javier Garcia-Manglano and Suzanne M. Bianchi. "The Motherhood Penalty at Midlife: The Long-Term Impact of Birth-Timing on Women’s Careers." Presented: Dallas TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2010.
3. Kahn, Joan R.
Kalsbeek, William D.
Hofferth, Sandra L.
National Estimates of Teenage Sexual Activity: Evaluating the Comparability of Three National Surveys
Demography 25,2 (May 1988): 189-204.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/h157407726170kj3/
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Young Women
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Intercourse; National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG); Sexual Activity; Sexual Behavior; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this article, the reliability with which teenage sexual activity was reported in three recent national surveys is examined. Unlike other study-effects analyses of objective demographic phenomena such as births and marriages, the study focuses on a more sensitive question - age at first intercourse as reported in three very different surveys. Specifically, we compare reports for the 1959-1963 cohort in the 1979 Kantner-Zelnik Study of Young Women, the 1982 National Survey of Family Growth, and the 1983 wave of the NLSY. For the ages when the majority of teens become sexually active (16-19), the three surveys provide comparable estimates of early sexual activity. For the younger teen ages, however, there is some disagreement among the estimates. Nevertheless, all three studies produce consistent estimates of the determinants of sexual activity throughout the teen years.
Bibliography Citation
Kahn, Joan R., William D. Kalsbeek and Sandra L. Hofferth. "National Estimates of Teenage Sexual Activity: Evaluating the Comparability of Three National Surveys." Demography 25,2 (May 1988): 189-204.
4. Reeder, Lori
Kahn, Joan R.
The Effects of Student Loan Debt on the Transition to Parenthood
Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Debt/Borrowing; Fertility; Gender Differences; Student Loans; Transition, Adulthood

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper uses data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) cohort to examine the relationship between student loan debt and fertility decisions during the transition to adulthood. We hypothesize that the burden of loan debt will lead women (and men) to feel greater financial insecurity and therefore postpone (and potentially forego) the family building process. We test these ideas using two approaches: first, we use cross-sectional data from the 2009 wave of the NLSY97 (when respondents were ages 24-30) to explore the relationship between loan debt and both childlessness and the number of children ever born. We find that, net of all controls in the model, student loan debt is negatively and significantly associated with the fertility of young adult women. It appears that the key difference is between those with and without debt, since among those with debt, there is relatively little difference by level of debt. In the second part of our analysis, we will use event history methods to model the impact of time-varying measures of debt on the timing of first births.
Bibliography Citation
Reeder, Lori and Joan R. Kahn. "The Effects of Student Loan Debt on the Transition to Parenthood." Presented: Denver CO, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2012.