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Author: Karlson, Kristian Bernt
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Andersen, Lars Hojsgaard
Karlson, Kristian Bernt
The Impact of Paternal Incarceration on Boys' Delinquency: A New Method for Adjusting for Model-Driven Bias
Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Society of Criminology (ASC) Annual Meeting, November 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Cross-national Analysis; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Denmark, Danish; Incarceration/Jail; Modeling; Parental Influences; Sons

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Paternal incarceration has a range of deleterious effects on children, especially on boys' behavioral problems, and the damaging impact of paternal incarceration on boys' delinquency is among the most well-established findings in studies of the intergenerational consequences of incarceration. Measures of sons' delinquency are often dichotomous, indicating whether a son exhibits delinquent behavior, and scholars of criminology often apply nonlinear probability models to analyze such outcomes. But in so doing, we involuntarily make our estimates vulnerable to model-driven bias, because these models are sensitive to their own fundamental assumptions. In this paper, we introduce to scholars of criminology a recent advance in the methodology of nonlinear models, the "KHB method". We use data from the NLSY97 to illustrate that existing strategies for estimating the impact of paternal incarceration on sons' delinquency produce biased estimates, and we use high quality registry data from Denmark to show that this is true even across sentence length and across the distribution of sons' abilities. Our bias-corrected estimates still support the claim that paternal incarceration is damaging to sons' delinquency, but they also cause concern regarding the widespread use of nonlinear models in criminological research.
Bibliography Citation
Andersen, Lars Hojsgaard and Kristian Bernt Karlson. "The Impact of Paternal Incarceration on Boys' Delinquency: A New Method for Adjusting for Model-Driven Bias." Presented: Philadelphia PA, American Society of Criminology (ASC) Annual Meeting, November 2017.
2. Karlson, Kristian Bernt
College as Equalizer? Testing the Selectivity Hypothesis
Social Science Research 80 (May 2019): 216-229.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X17308244
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): College Degree; Family Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mobility, Social; Selectivity Bias/Selection Bias; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Stratification research shows that occupational origins and destinations are weakly associated among individuals holding a college degree. The finding is taken to support the hypothesis that college equalizes opportunities and promotes social mobility. I test the competing hypothesis that the high level of social mobility reported for college degree holders results from the selectivity of this group. To control for selectivity, I reweigh a sample of college degree holders by the inverse probability of being a college degree holder conditional on observable characteristics of students before they enter college, including characteristics such as cognitive ability, personality traits, and beliefs about the future. Analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), I find no support for the selectivity hypothesis. These findings align with evidence based on indirect tests of the hypothesis, and indicate that college indeed appears to be an equalizer.
Bibliography Citation
Karlson, Kristian Bernt. "College as Equalizer? Testing the Selectivity Hypothesis." Social Science Research 80 (May 2019): 216-229.