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Author: Kozimor-King, Michele Lee
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Heron, Melonie
Kozimor-King, Michele Lee
Hayward, Mark D.
The Effects of Race on Men's Mid- and Late-Career Occupational Mobility
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Career Patterns; Data Quality/Consistency; Education; Geographical Variation; Job Status; Mobility; Mobility, Job; Racial Differences; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Examines the mid- & late-career mobility experiences for black & white men ages 45-64, drawing on data derived from the National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, to assess the extent to which differences in achievement processes persist into mid- & late career, & to examine whether blacks & whites differ in terms of age vulnerability of careers. Contrary to these hypotheses, controlling for individual & job characteristics, race is significant only for upward within-employer mobility. Moreover, everything else being equal, blacks demonstrate high rates of upward mobility. Other factors, e.g., job sector, wealth, education, & geographical location, were more important than race for between-employer moves & within-employer downward mobility. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Heron, Melonie, Michele Lee Kozimor-King and Mark D. Hayward. "The Effects of Race on Men's Mid- and Late-Career Occupational Mobility." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996.
2. Kozimor-King, Michele Lee
Does Belief Matter? Social Psychological Characteristics and the Likelihood of Welfare Use and Exit
Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 35,1 (March 2008): 197-219.
Also: https://secure.touchnet.net/C21782_ustores/web/product_detail.jsp?PRODUCTID=820
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Michigan University School of Social Work
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Human Capital; Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Occupational Status; Psychological Effects; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies have reemerged examining social psychological variables as predictors of individual differences in the human experience. Still, current research focusing on the effects of self-beliefs on welfare use and exit is limited. This study examines the effects of social psychological variables on the likelihood of welfare use and five-year outcomes of women using data from the 1979 through 2000 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Binary logistic regression estimates suggest that social psychological characteristics are initially related to welfare use, but do not remain once control variables are introduced. While social psychological predictors do not appear to have strong or robust direct effects in multivariate models, traditional human capital variables of public assistance outcomes past initial entry are significant. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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Bibliography Citation
Kozimor-King, Michele Lee. "Does Belief Matter? Social Psychological Characteristics and the Likelihood of Welfare Use and Exit ." Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare 35,1 (March 2008): 197-219.
3. Kozimor-King, Michele Lee
You Have to Believe: The Effects of Locus Of Control and Self-Efficacy on Welfare Use and Long-Term Outcomes
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University, 2005. DAI-A 66/04, p. 1516, Oct 2005
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: ProQuest Dissertations & Theses (PQDT)
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Locus of Control (see Rotter Scale); Occupational Status; Rotter Scale (see Locus of Control); Self-Esteem; Self-Perception; Socioeconomic Status (SES); Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Numerous studies have examined locus of control and self-efficacy as predictors of individual differences in the human experience including unemployment, health, homelessness, occupational choice, and academic performance. Most of these studies have found that control over life outcomes and judged capability to perform a given action influence future goals and attainment including outcomes in education, work skills, labor market experience, and demographic characteristics (such as fertility and marriage). In contrast, most of the current research on the socioeconomic attainment of welfare recipients focuses on human capital characteristics and family background variables. What is largely overlooked in the welfare literature is an analysis of how self-beliefs formed and measured early in life influence future goals and attainment. This dissertation examines the effects of locus of control and self-efficacy on the likelihood of welfare use, five-year outcomes, and wages of former welfare recipients using data from the 1979 through 2000 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Binary logistic regression estimates confirm that social psychological characteristics formed early in life are initially related to welfare use. As expected, women with external locus of control and low occupational self-efficacy are more likely to receive welfare than those with an internal locus. While the social psychological predictors do not appear to have strong or robust direct effects on welfare outcomes past initial entry or on socioeconomic attainment five years following an initial exposure, occupational self-efficacy provides a notable exception. The effects of classical predictors of welfare outcomes, human capital and family background characteristics, appear to have the strongest effects on the likelihood of ever receiving welfare, five-year welfare outcomes, and socioeconomic attainment. Results of this study suggest that more research on the effect of social psychological predictors on welfare outcomes and long term socioeconomic attainment of welfare recipients should be conducted where changes in locus of control and self-efficacy using a domain-specific construct are measured after initial exposure to welfare. As it stands, the results of this dissertation have important implications for the current welfare system, especially concerning time restrictions and self-sufficiency goals.
Bibliography Citation
Kozimor-King, Michele Lee. You Have to Believe: The Effects of Locus Of Control and Self-Efficacy on Welfare Use and Long-Term Outcomes. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University, 2005. DAI-A 66/04, p. 1516, Oct 2005.