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Author: Kurtulus, Aysenur
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Yang, Tse-Chuan
Chen, I-Chien
Choi, Seung-won
Kurtulus, Aysenur
Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Mid-adulthood: Self-esteem and Risk-Behavior Mechanisms
Social Science and Medicine published online (16 July 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.06.012.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953618303125#!
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Modeling, Structural Equation; Risk-Taking

Rationale: The literature on the effect of perceived discrimination on health has three gaps. First, the long-term relationship between perceived discrimination and health is underexplored. Second, the mechanisms through which perceived discrimination affects health remain unclear. Third, most studies focus on racial/ethnic discrimination, and other aspects of discrimination are overlooked.

Objective: This study aims to fill these gaps by testing a research framework that links the discriminatory experience during adolescence to an individual's health during mid-adulthood via self-esteem and risk behaviors at early adulthood.

Method: Structural equation modeling is applied to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 Cohort (N = 6478).

Results: The discriminatory experience during adolescence imposes an adverse impact on health during mid-adulthood even after accounting for other potential covariates, a detrimental effect lasting for over 30 years. In addition, while perceived discrimination reduces self-esteem at early adulthood, it affects only mental health during mid-adulthood, rather than general health. Finally, the discriminatory experience promotes risk behaviors at early adulthood and the risk behaviors subsequently compromise health during mid-adulthood.

Bibliography Citation
Yang, Tse-Chuan, I-Chien Chen, Seung-won Choi and Aysenur Kurtulus. "Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Mid-adulthood: Self-esteem and Risk-Behavior Mechanisms." Social Science and Medicine published online (16 July 2018): DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.06.012.
2. Yang, Tse-Chuan
Chen, I-Chien
Choi, Seung-won
Kurtulus, Aysenur
Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Middle Adulthood via Self-esteem and Risk Behaviors
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Adolescent Behavior; Discrimination; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Life Course; Modeling, Structural Equation; Risk-Taking; Self-Esteem

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The literature on the effect of perceived discrimination on health has three gaps. First, the causality between perceived discrimination and health is underexplored. Second, the mechanisms through which perceived discrimination affects health remain unclear. Third, most studies focus on racial/ethnic discrimination and other aspects of discrimination are overlooked. This study aims to fill these gaps by testing a research framework that links the discriminatory experience during adolescence to one's health during middle adulthood via self-esteem and risk behaviors at early adulthood. Applying structural equation modeling to the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we obtained three key findings: (1) The discriminatory experience during adolescence imposes an adverse impact on one's health during middle adulthood even after accounting for other potential covariates, a detrimental effect lasting for over 30 years; (2) While perceived discrimination reduces self-esteem at early adulthood, it affects only mental health during middle adulthood, rather than general health; and (3) The discriminatory experience promotes risk behaviors at early adulthood and the risk behaviors subsequently compromise the health during middle adulthood. Using a life course perspective, we found that the effect of perceived discrimination is more profound than the literature suggested and that risk behaviors may account for approximately 17% of the total effect of perceived discrimination on health. Our findings highlight the importance of early intervention in coping with perceived discrimination during adolescence, a critical life stage where one develops his/her personality.
Bibliography Citation
Yang, Tse-Chuan, I-Chien Chen, Seung-won Choi and Aysenur Kurtulus. "Linking Perceived Discrimination during Adolescence to Health during Middle Adulthood via Self-esteem and Risk Behaviors." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.