Search Results

Author: Lee, Myoung-Jae
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Huang, Fali
Lee, Myoung-Jae
Does Television Viewing Affect Children's Behaviour?
Pacific Economic Review 14,4 (October 2009): 474-501.
Also: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122688606/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Endogeneity; Social Emotional Development; Television Viewing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using three-period panel data drawn from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we investigate whether television (TV) viewing at ages 6-7 and 8-9 years affects children's social and behavioural development at ages 8-9 years. Dynamic panel data models are estimated to handle the unobserved child-specific factor, endogeneity of TV viewing, and the dynamic nature of the causal relation. Special emphasis is placed on this last aspect, focusing on how early TV viewing affects interim child behavioural problems and in turn affects future TV viewing. Overall, we find that TV viewing during ages 6-7 and 8-9 years increases child behavioural problems at ages 8-9 years, and that the effect is economically sizable. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Fali and Myoung-Jae Lee. "Does Television Viewing Affect Children's Behaviour?" Pacific Economic Review 14,4 (October 2009): 474-501.
2. Huang, Fali
Lee, Myoung-Jae
Dynamic Treatment Effect Analysis of TV Effects on Child Cognitive Development
Working Paper, School of Economics and Social Sciences, Singapore Management University, September 21, 2007.
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: School of Economics, Singapore Management University
Keyword(s): Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Television Viewing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate whether TV watching at ages 6-7 and 8-9 affects cognitive development measured by math and reading scores at age 8-9 using a rich childhood longitudinal sample from NLSY79. Dynamic panel data models are estimated to handle the unobserved child-specific factor, endogeneity of TV watching and dynamic nature of the causal relation. A special emphasis is put on the last aspect where TV watching affects cognitive development which in turn affects the future TV watching. When this feedback occurs, it is not straightforward to identify and estimate the TV effect. We adopt estimation methods available in the biostatistics literature which can deal with the feedback feature, plus the "standard" econometric panel data IV approach. Overall, we find that watching TV for more than two hours per day during ages 6-9 has a negative total effect on math score at age 8-9, mostly due to a large negative effect of TV watching at the younger ages 6-7. There is also some evidence that TV watching between 2-4 hours per day has a positive effect on reading score than too much or too little TV watching. In both cases, however, the effect magnitudes are economically small.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Fali and Myoung-Jae Lee. "Dynamic Treatment Effect Analysis of TV Effects on Child Cognitive Development." Working Paper, School of Economics and Social Sciences, Singapore Management University, September 21, 2007.
3. Huang, Fali
Lee, Myoung-Jae
Dynamic Treatment Effect Analysis of TV Effects on Child Cognitive Development
Working Paper 10-2007, School of Economics and Social Sciences, Singapore Management University, September 2007.
Also: http://www.eaber.org/intranet/documents/41/1532/SMU_Huang_2007_02.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: School of Economics, Singapore Management University
Keyword(s): Cognitive Development; Endogeneity; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Television Viewing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate whether TV watching at ages 6-7 and 8-9 affects cognitive development measured by math and reading scores at ages 8-9 using a rich childhood longitudinal sample from NLSY79. Dynamic panel data models are estimated to handle the unobserved child-specific factor, endogeneity of TV watching, and dynamic nature of the causal relation. A special emphasis is put on the last aspect where TV watching affects cognitive development which in turn affects the future TV watching. When this feedback occurs, it is not straightforward to identify and estimate the TV effect. We adopt estimation methods available in the biostatistics literature which can deal with the feedback feature; we also apply the “standard” econometric panel data IV approaches. Overall, for math score at ages 8-9, we find that watching TV for more than two hours per day during ages 6-9 has a negative total effect mostly due to a large negative effect of TV watching at the younger ages 6-7. For reading score, there are evidences that TV watching between 2-4 hours per day has a positive effect whereas the effect is negative outside this range. In both cases, however, the effect magnitudes are economically small.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Fali and Myoung-Jae Lee. "Dynamic Treatment Effect Analysis of TV Effects on Child Cognitive Development." Working Paper 10-2007, School of Economics and Social Sciences, Singapore Management University, September 2007.
4. Huang, Fali
Lee, Myoung-Jae
Dynamic Treatment Effect Analysis of TV Effects on Child Cognitive Development
Journal of Applied Econometrics 25,3 (2010): 392-419.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jae.1165/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Cognitive Development; Endogeneity; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); School Characteristics/Rating/Safety; Television Viewing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We investigate whether TV watching at ages 6–7 and 8–9 affects cognitive development measured by math and reading scores at ages 8–9, using a rich childhood longitudinal sample from NLSY79. Dynamic panel data models are estimated to handle the unobserved child-specific factor, endogeneity of TV watching, and dynamic nature of the causal relation. A special emphasis is placed on the last aspect, where TV watching affects cognitive development, which in turn affects future TV watching. When this feedback occurs, it is not straightforward to identify and estimate the TV effect. We develop a two-stage estimation method which can deal with the feedback feature; we also apply the 'standard' econometric panel data approaches. Overall, for math score at ages 8–9, we find that watching TV during ages 6–7 and 8–9 has a negative total effect, mostly due to a large negative effect of TV watching at the younger ages 6–7. For reading score, there is evidence that watching no more than 2 hours of TV per day has a positive effect, whereas the effect is negative outside this range. In both cases, however, the effect magnitudes are economically small.
Bibliography Citation
Huang, Fali and Myoung-Jae Lee. "Dynamic Treatment Effect Analysis of TV Effects on Child Cognitive Development." Journal of Applied Econometrics 25,3 (2010): 392-419.
5. Lee, Myoung-Jae
Huang, Fali
Finding Dynamic Treatment Effects under Anticipation: The Effects of Spanking on Behaviour
Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society) 175,2 (April 2012): 535-567.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-985X.2011.01001.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Discipline; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Modeling; Punishment, Corporal

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The dynamic treatment effect literature considers multiple treatments administered over time, with some treatments affected by interim outcomes. But the literature overlooks the possibility of individuals acting in anticipation of future treatments. This lack of anticipation aspect may not matter in the drug–response relationships which motivated the literature. But human beings (or animals with some intelligence) do not just respond to current and past treatments, but also ‘reflect and anticipate’ future treatments. For example, a punishment or reward is likely to prompt forward looking. Even if no personal punishment or reward is involved, people may take action in anticipation of a future government policy, which would be an important concern for policy makers. The paper explores how to find dynamic treatment effects allowing for forward looking or anticipation by extending available dynamic treatment effect approaches in the literature. Then the methods proposed are applied to the effects of spanking on a child's bad behaviour where a child may act better in anticipation of future spanking, which is analogous to the relationship between punishment and crime.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Myoung-Jae and Fali Huang. "Finding Dynamic Treatment Effects under Anticipation: The Effects of Spanking on Behaviour." Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society) 175,2 (April 2012): 535-567.
6. Lee, Myoung-Jae
Huang, Fali
Structural IVE for Dynamic Treatment Effects: Spanking Effects on Behavior
Presented: Bristol, England, ESRC Econometric Study Group Conference, July 13-15, 2006.
Also: http://www.cirje.e.u-tokyo.ac.jp/research/workshops/micro/documents/sept4Lee2_001.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Children, Behavioral Development; Modeling; Motor and Social Development (MSD); Parenting Skills/Styles; Parents, Behavior; Punishment, Corporal

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Finding the effects of multiple sequential treatments on a response variable measured at the end of a trial is difficult, if some treatments are affected by interim responses; e.g., assessing the effects of spanking on behavior when parents adjust their spanking level depending on interim behaviors. A headway, 'G estimation', has been made in 1980's generalizing the usual static treatment effect analysis under 'selection on observables'. But G estimation is hard to implement. In this paper, firstly, we propose a much simpler alternative to G estimation– a single or multiple IVE's for a linear structural model–and show that our proposal and G estimation identify the same effect under some assumptions. Secondly, we explore the relation between our proposal and Granger causality to show that our approach is more general, although the two become equivalent for testing non-causality under a stationarity assumption. Thirdly, our approach and G estimation are applied to find the effects of spanking on behavior. We find that mild spanking at early years reduces a child's behavior problems later, which seems to differ from most findings in the psychology literature.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Myoung-Jae and Fali Huang. "Structural IVE for Dynamic Treatment Effects: Spanking Effects on Behavior." Presented: Bristol, England, ESRC Econometric Study Group Conference, July 13-15, 2006.