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Author: Li, Qi
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Chen, Xirong
Li, Degui
Li, Qi
Li, Zheng
Nonparametric Estimation of Conditional Quantile Functions in the Presence of Irrelevant Covariates
Journal of Econometrics 212,2 (October 2019): 433-450.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304407619301034
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Dating; Modeling, Nonparametric Regression; Wages, Men; Wages, Women

Allowing for the existence of irrelevant covariates, we study the problem of estimating a conditional quantile function nonparametrically with mixed discrete and continuous data. We estimate the conditional quantile regression function using the check-function-based kernel method and suggest a data-driven cross-validation (CV) approach to simultaneously determine the optimal smoothing parameters and remove the irrelevant covariates. When the number of covariates is large, we first use a screening method to remove the irrelevant covariates and then apply the CV criterion to those that survive the screening procedure. Simulations and an empirical application demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods.
Bibliography Citation
Chen, Xirong, Degui Li, Qi Li and Zheng Li. "Nonparametric Estimation of Conditional Quantile Functions in the Presence of Irrelevant Covariates." Journal of Econometrics 212,2 (October 2019): 433-450.
2. Colen, Cynthia G.
Li, Qi
Reczek, Corinne
The Intergenerational Transmission of Discrimination: Children's Experiences of Unfair Treatment and Their Mother's Health at Midlife
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Racial Equality/Inequality

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Bibliography Citation
Colen, Cynthia G., Qi Li and Corinne Reczek. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Discrimination: Children's Experiences of Unfair Treatment and Their Mother's Health at Midlife." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
3. Colen, Cynthia G.
Li, Qi
Reczek, Corinne
Williams, David R.
The Intergenerational Transmission of Discrimination: Children's Experiences of Unfair Treatment and Their Mothers' Health at Midlife
Journal of Health and Social Behavior 60,4 (December 2019): 474-492.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0022146519887347
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Ethnic Differences; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Mothers, Health; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A growing body of research suggests that maternal exposure to discrimination helps to explain racial disparities in children's health. However, no study has considered if the intergenerational health effects of unfair treatment operate in the opposite direction--from child to mother. To this end, we use data from mother-child pairs in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 to determine whether adolescent and young adult children's experiences of discrimination influence their mother's health across midlife. We find that children who report more frequent instances of discrimination have mothers whose self-rated health declines more rapidly between ages 40 and 50 years. Furthermore, racial disparities in exposure to discrimination among children explains almost 10% of the black-white gap but little of the Hispanic-white gap in self-rated health among these mothers. We conclude that the negative health impacts of discrimination are likely to operate in a bidirectional fashion across key family relationships.
Bibliography Citation
Colen, Cynthia G., Qi Li, Corinne Reczek and David R. Williams. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Discrimination: Children's Experiences of Unfair Treatment and Their Mothers' Health at Midlife ." Journal of Health and Social Behavior 60,4 (December 2019): 474-492.
4. Gan, Li
Shin, Jaeun
Li, Qi
Initial Wage, Human Capital and Post Wage Differentials
Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics 51 (December 2010): 79-97.
Also: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/handle/10086/18778
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Hitotsubashi University
Keyword(s): Human Capital; Job Productivity; Wage Determination; Wage Dynamics; Wage Models

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Insufficiency in information with which firms judge the productivity of a worker for the first time in the market creates more randomness in initial wages than in later wages. This paper examines whether the initial randomness in wages may have a persistent effect on post wages. We set up a human capital accumulation in which an individual may respond to the positive error in initial wage by adjusting hours worked thereafter in her career, and consequently may receive higher future wages than those who draw a negative error in initial wages but otherwise are equivalent. The model predicts that the initial wage, in particular, its random component, is a persistently important factor having positive effect on future wages. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 79, we find empirical evidence that this effect is indeed positive and persists even after 20 years since the initial entry to labor market. The decomposition of initial wages by both parametric and nonparametric IV methods further shows that this effect is derived by the random component, not the observable component, of the initial wage. It implies that the observed cross-sectional wage variation within group can be accounted for the initial randomness in wages.
Bibliography Citation
Gan, Li, Jaeun Shin and Qi Li. "Initial Wage, Human Capital and Post Wage Differentials." Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics 51 (December 2010): 79-97.
5. Petts, Richard James
Knoester, Chris
Li, Qi
Attitudes, Patterns, and Predictors of Paternity Leave-Taking among U.S. Fathers
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Fathers; Leave, Family or Maternity/Paternity

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Surprisingly few studies have focused on paternity leave-taking in the U.S. This study utilizes data from four national datasets to provide a comprehensive examination of the attitudes, practices, and predictors of paternity leave-taking in the U.S. Specifically, this study focuses on (a) describing attitudes towards, and practices of, paternity leave-taking in the U.S. and (b) analyzing the extent to which economic capital, social capital, and father identities predict these attitudes and practices. The results indicate that most people support paid paternity leave opportunities in the U.S. Yet, rates of paid paternity leave-taking are relatively low and most fathers take total leaves that last one week or less. Economic capital, social capital, and father identities that prioritize engaged fathering are positively associated with taking leave and taking longer periods of leave. Overall, the results emphasize that the current structure of U.S. paternity leave policies may contribute to patterns of inequality due to more advantaged fathers having greater access and ability to take paternity leave than less advantaged fathers.
Bibliography Citation
Petts, Richard James, Chris Knoester and Qi Li. "Attitudes, Patterns, and Predictors of Paternity Leave-Taking among U.S. Fathers." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.