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Author: Malone, Patrick S.
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Malone, Patrick S.
Lamis, Dorian A.
Masyn, Katherine E.
Northrup, Thomas F.
A Dual-Process Discrete-Time Survival Analysis Model: Application to the Gateway Drug Hypothesis
Multivariate Behavioral Research 45,5 (2010): 790-805.
Also: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a929458147~frm=abslink
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Drug Use; Modeling; Statistical Analysis; Time Theory

The gateway drug model is a popular conceptualization of a progression most substance users are hypothesized to follow as they try different legal and illegal drugs. Most forms of the gateway hypothesis are that 'softer' drugs lead to 'harder,' illicit drugs. However, the gateway hypothesis has been notably difficult to directly test-that is, to test as competing hypotheses in a single model that licit drug use might lead to illicit drug use or the reverse. This article presents a novel statistical technique, dual-process discrete-time survival analysis, which enables this comparison. This method uses mixture-modeling software to estimate 2 concurrent time-to-event processes and their effects on each other. Using this method, support for the gateway hypothesis in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997, was weak. However, this article was not designed as a strong test of causal direction but more as a technical demonstration and suffered from certain technological limitations. Both these limitations and future directions are discussed. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Malone, Patrick S., Dorian A. Lamis, Katherine E. Masyn and Thomas F. Northrup. "A Dual-Process Discrete-Time Survival Analysis Model: Application to the Gateway Drug Hypothesis." Multivariate Behavioral Research 45,5 (2010): 790-805.
2. Malone, Patrick S.
Northrup, Thomas F.
Masyn, Katherine E.
Lamis, Dorian A.
Lamont, Andrea E.
Initiation and Persistence of Alcohol Use in United States Black, Hispanic, and White Male and Female Youth
Addictive Behaviors 37,3 (March 2012): 299-305.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306460311003728
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Ethnic Differences; Gender Differences; Modeling; Racial Differences

Background: The relation between early and frequent alcohol use and later difficulties is quite strong. However, the degree that alcohol use persists, which is often a necessary cause for developing alcohol-related problems or an alcohol use disorder, is not well studied, particularly with attention to race and gender. A novel statistical approach, the Multi-facet Longitudinal Model, enables the concurrent study of age of initiation and persistence.

Methods: The models were applied to longitudinal data on youth alcohol use from ages 12 through 19, collected in the (U.S.) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (N = 8984).

Results: Results confirmed that Black adolescents initiate alcohol use at later ages than do White youth. Further, after initiation, White adolescents were substantially more likely than Black adolescents to continue reporting alcohol use in subsequent years. Hispanic teens showed an intermediate pattern. Gender differences were more ambiguous, with a tendency for boys to be less likely to continue drinking after initiation than were girls.

Conclusions: Novel findings from the new analytic models suggest differential implications of early alcohol use by race and gender. Early use of alcohol might be less consequential for males who initiate alcohol use early, Black, and Hispanic youth than for their female and White counterparts.

Bibliography Citation
Malone, Patrick S., Thomas F. Northrup, Katherine E. Masyn, Dorian A. Lamis and Andrea E. Lamont. "Initiation and Persistence of Alcohol Use in United States Black, Hispanic, and White Male and Female Youth." Addictive Behaviors 37,3 (March 2012): 299-305.