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Author: McCauley, Erin J.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. McCauley, Erin J.
The Cumulative Probability of Arrest by Age 28 Years in the United States by Disability Status, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender
American Journal of Public Health 107,12 (1 December 2017): 1977-1981.
Also: http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2017.304095?journalCode=ajph
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Public Health Association
Keyword(s): Arrests; Disability; Discrimination, Racial/Ethnic; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objectives. To estimate the cumulative probability (c) of arrest by age 28 years in the United States by disability status, race/ethnicity, and gender.

Methods. I estimated cumulative probabilities through birth cohort life tables with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997.

Results. Estimates demonstrated that those with disabilities have a higher cumulative probability of arrest (c = 42.65) than those without (c = 29.68). The risk was disproportionately spread across races/ethnicities, with Blacks with disabilities experiencing the highest cumulative probability of arrest (c = 55.17) and Whites without disabilities experiencing the lowest (c = 27.55). Racial/ethnic differences existed by gender as well. There was a similar distribution of disability types across race/ethnicity, suggesting that the racial/ethnic differences in arrest may stem from racial/ethnic inequalities as opposed to differential distribution of disability types.

Conclusions. The experience of arrest for those with disabilities was higher than expected. Police officers should understand how disabilities may affect compliance and other behaviors, and likewise how implicit bias and structural racism may affect reactions and actions of officers and the systems they work within in ways that create inequities.

Bibliography Citation
McCauley, Erin J. "The Cumulative Probability of Arrest by Age 28 Years in the United States by Disability Status, Race/Ethnicity, and Gender." American Journal of Public Health 107,12 (1 December 2017): 1977-1981.
2. McCauley, Erin J.
The Effect of Parental Incarceration Prior to Age 16 on Sexual Health and Characteristics of First Sexual Experience
Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Adolescent Sexual Activity; Age at First Intercourse; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Contraception; Incarceration/Jail; Parental Influences; Pregnancy, Adolescent

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Sexual health behaviors shape long term health and wellbeing. Despite evidence that parental incarceration is associated with health, few studies have explored the association between parental incarceration and sexual health specifically. Using linear probability models and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 I examine the association between parental incarceration and sexual health behaviors and characteristics of first sexual experience. I find that parental incarceration prior to age 16 is associated with increased probabilities of reporting sex with a stranger (15%, p<0.001), sex with an intravenous drug user (2%, p<0.05), and becoming pregnant (5%, p<0.05), and decreased condom use (9%, p<0.01). Parental incarceration is also associated with younger age of first sexual experience, increased probability of not discussing birth control, and decreased probabilities of any birth control usage. Children of incarcerated parents experience sexual health risks and need increased access to reproductive health care and sexual health information.
Bibliography Citation
McCauley, Erin J. "The Effect of Parental Incarceration Prior to Age 16 on Sexual Health and Characteristics of First Sexual Experience." Presented: Austin TX, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2019.
3. McCauley, Erin J.
The Role of Stress and Absence: How Household Member Incarceration is Associated with Risky Sexual Health Behaviors
Social Science and Medicine published online (29 January 2021): 113718.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277953621000502
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Contraception; Fathers, Absence; Incarceration/Jail; Parental Influences; Sexual Behavior; Stress

Sexual health is a critical indicator of wellbeing with consequences for population health. However, little is known about whether and how household member incarceration affects the sexual health behaviors of young adults. This study seeks to assess the association between household member incarceration and sexual health behaviors and provides an initial test of mechanisms. Drawing upon data from the NLSY97, this study estimates the association between household member incarceration and sexual health behaviors using linear probability models, and then re-estimates these associations using two alternative comparison groups; 1) youth who experienced other forms of stress, and 2) youth who experienced other forms of family absence. Results indicate that household incarceration is positively associated with a higher risk of reporting sexual intercourse with an intravenous drug user net of individual and family characteristics and is negatively associated with condom use net of individual but not family characteristics. The results also show that the associations between household member incarceration and sexual health behaviors may be attributable, at least in part, to the well documented stress associated with incarceration. Yet, the results provide little evidence that absence is a pathway linking household member incarceration to risky sexual health behaviors. It is possible that household member incarceration is linked to deleterious outcomes for youth through different mechanisms than parental incarceration given the differing roles of parents versus other adults in the home.
Bibliography Citation
McCauley, Erin J. "The Role of Stress and Absence: How Household Member Incarceration is Associated with Risky Sexual Health Behaviors." Social Science and Medicine published online (29 January 2021): 113718.