Search Results

Author: Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Resulting in 13 citations.
1. Makki, Nazgol
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Mental Health and Happiness: Evidence From the U.S. Data
The American Economist 64,2 (October 2019): 197-215.
Also: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0569434518822266
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Omicron Delta Phi
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Health, Mental; Job Satisfaction; Well-Being

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The current study examines the role of poor mental health characterized by depression in the determination of an individual's happiness measured by self-satisfaction and job satisfaction. Using two samples from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79) and following an ordered probit approach, the study demonstrates that, other variables held constant, an individual suffering from mental depression is likely to have lower levels of self-satisfaction and job satisfaction than those with better mental health. The significance of this variable in both self-satisfaction and job satisfaction regressions indicates that metal health status is an important covariate of an individual's overall well-being, and should not, therefore, be omitted when estimating relevant happiness equations.
Bibliography Citation
Makki, Nazgol and Madhu Sudan Mohanty. "Mental Health and Happiness: Evidence From the U.S. Data." The American Economist 64,2 (October 2019): 197-215.
2. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Determination of Participation Decision, Hiring Decision, and Wages in A Double Selection Framework: Male-Female Wage Differentials in the U.S. Labor Market Revisited
Contemporary Economic Policy 19,2 (April 2001): 197-212.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2001.tb00061.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Labor Force Participation; Labor Market Demographics; Sample Selection; Wage Differentials; Wage Equations

The magnitude of the male-female wage differential is known to be highly sensitive to the specification of the wage equations used. An important source of misspecification is the failure to correct the sample selection bias that results from estimating the wage equation obtained through 2 sequential decisions: the worker's decision to participate in the labor market and the employer's decision to hire. Following a double selection approach and using a sample from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examines the determinants of not only the wage equation but also the worker's participation and the employer's hiring decisions in both male and female samples. The study further demonstrates that the unexplained male-female wage differential remains underestimated when the roles of both selection decisions are ignored in the estimation of wage equations. Copyright Western Economic Association Apr 2001.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Determination of Participation Decision, Hiring Decision, and Wages in A Double Selection Framework: Male-Female Wage Differentials in the U.S. Labor Market Revisited." Contemporary Economic Policy 19,2 (April 2001): 197-212.
3. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Does Positive Attitude Matter Only for Older Workers? Evidence from Simultaneous Estimation of Job Satisfaction, Wage and Positive Attitude in the United States
Journal of Happiness Studies 19,8 (December 2018): 2373-2404.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10902-017-9930-6
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Job Satisfaction; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism); Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The current study tests two hypotheses. First, it claims that the worker's job satisfaction is related not only to the objective variable wage rate, but also to the psychological variable positive attitude, and that all three variables are simultaneously related. Second, the study predicts that the psychological variable positive attitude as a covariate of job satisfaction matters more for matured adults who are already settled in their desired jobs than younger workers who may still be in search of their preferred employment. Using data on matured adults and younger adults from the United States and following a two-stage procedure the current study estimates job satisfaction, wage and positive attitude equations in a simultaneous equations framework. The study confirms the presence of this simultaneous relationship, and demonstrates that the job satisfaction of matured adults in fact is related to both objective (wage) and subjective (attitude) factors. For younger workers, however, wage, and not positive attitude, emerges as a significant covariate of their job satisfaction. Since positive attitude plays a significant role in the determination of their wages, it is related to their job satisfaction only indirectly through higher wages. Positive attitude thus benefits both older and younger workers thorough different channels. The study further presents interesting results on the covariates of wage and positive attitude which remain disguised when the simultaneous relationship among these three variables is ignored.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Does Positive Attitude Matter Only for Older Workers? Evidence from Simultaneous Estimation of Job Satisfaction, Wage and Positive Attitude in the United States." Journal of Happiness Studies 19,8 (December 2018): 2373-2404.
4. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Effects of Job Satisfaction on the Worker's Wage and Weekly Hours: A Simultaneous Equations Approach
Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics 79 (April 2019): 27-42.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214804318300831
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Wages; Work Hours

The current study examines the effects of job satisfaction on the worker's weekly wage and hours. Under the assumption that these three variables may be simultaneously related, the study estimates wage, weekly hours and job satisfaction equations in a simultaneous equations framework by a two-stage procedure. Using three separate samples from the NLSY79, the study demonstrates that, regardless of the age of the worker, weekly wage is positively related to job satisfaction. The relation between weekly hours and job satisfaction, however, is not uniform among workers of all age-groups. Hours are related to job satisfaction positively when workers are younger or when they are mature adults and negatively when they are middle-age adults. Interestingly, weekly wage and weekly hours are found to be statistically insignificant in most job satisfaction equations, whereas job satisfaction emerges as a significant covariate in both wage and hours equations. This recursive relationship among these three variables indicates that job satisfaction may in fact influence wage and weekly hours in a causal sense. Since computationally tractable formulas for the corrected asymptotic variance-covariance matrices of the proposed two-stage estimators are not available in the literature, the study derives them for the benefit of econometrics practitioners.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Effects of Job Satisfaction on the Worker's Wage and Weekly Hours: A Simultaneous Equations Approach." Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics 79 (April 2019): 27-42.
5. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Effects of Positive Attitude and Optimism on Employment: Evidence from the US Data
Journal of Socio-Economics 39,2 (April 2010): 258-270.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535710000041
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Employment; Human Capital; Labor Force Participation; Modeling, Probit; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism); Psychological Effects

Using samples from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) and following a bivariate probit approach, the current study estimates the worker's employment probability equations in both cross-sectional and panel data frameworks. The study demonstrates that the employment of the worker, which depends on both the worker's labor market participation decision and the employer's hiring decision, is determined partly by the positive and optimistic attitude of the worker. The effects of these attitude variables on both decisions are even larger than the effects of standard human capital variables. The study further demonstrates that the attitude variables affect employment probabilities of men and women differently because their effects on participation and hiring decisions are different. [Copyright © Elsevier]

Copyright of Journal of Socio-Economics is the property of Elsevier Science Publishing Company, Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Effects of Positive Attitude and Optimism on Employment: Evidence from the US Data." Journal of Socio-Economics 39,2 (April 2010): 258-270.
6. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Effects of Positive Attitude and Optimism on Wage and Employment: A Double Selection Approach
Journal of Socio-Economics 41,3 (June 2012): 304-316.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535712000078
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Employment; Labor Force Participation; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism); Wage Rates

Using two samples from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), a longitudinal data set from the United States, and following a double selection approach, the current study estimates the worker's employment and wage equations simultaneously with positive attitude and optimism as additional explanatory variables. Modeling employment as a bivariate decision process, the study examines different factors that influence the worker's labor market participation decision, the employer's hiring decision and the wage rate. The study finds the evidence that the worker's positive attitude and optimism affect the worker's employment probability from different angles: the former through the participation decision and the latter through the hiring decision. Following an alternative approach, this study also provides strong support to the earlier finding that positive attitude affects the worker's wage positively. Interestingly, the effects of attitude variables on the worker's wage are found to be quite comparable in magnitude to the wage effects of the traditional human capital variables.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Effects of Positive Attitude and Optimism on Wage and Employment: A Double Selection Approach." Journal of Socio-Economics 41,3 (June 2012): 304-316.
7. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Effects of Positive Attitude on Happiness and Wage: Evidence from the US Data
Journal of Economic Psychology 30,6 (December 2009): 884-897.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016748700900097X
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Earnings; Endogeneity; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Human Capital; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism); Wage Levels; Well-Being; Work Attitudes

Using samples from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), a longitudinal data set from the United States, this study demonstrates that the worker's positive attitude affects his/her wage not only directly, but also indirectly through its effects on happiness. Assuming endogeneity of the positive attitude variable and estimating happiness and attitude equations simultaneously by a two-step procedure, the study further finds the evidence that happiness also affects the worker's earnings both directly and indirectly. These findings suggest that any attempt to raise workers' earnings potentials should focus not only on the development of their human capital endowments, but also on improvement of their attitudes. [Copyright Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Effects of Positive Attitude on Happiness and Wage: Evidence from the US Data." Journal of Economic Psychology 30,6 (December 2009): 884-897.
8. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Relationship between Positive Attitude and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from the US Data
Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 349-372.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/eej.2014.76
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Job Satisfaction; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), a longitudinal data set from the United States, and following different cross-sectional and panel data estimation procedures, the study demonstrates that the worker's job satisfaction is related positively to his/her positive attitude. This conclusion remains valid regardless of whether the worker's wage income is treated as an exogenous variable or as an endogenous variable. The study thus claims that the worker’s satisfaction at workplace is related to not only the external job-related factors, but also his/her inner psychological attitude.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Relationship between Positive Attitude and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from the US Data." Eastern Economic Journal 42,3 (June 2016): 349-372.
9. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Role of Psychological Variables in the Determination of the Worker's Wage: Further Evidence from the United States
Australian Economic Papers 58,1 (March 2019): 54-77.
Also: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-8454.12140
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Job Satisfaction; Positive Affect (see Happiness/Optimism); Psychological Effects; Wage Determination

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The current study examines the roles of three psychological variables, job satisfaction, positive attitude and self‐satisfaction, in the determination of the worker's wage. Using two samples from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youths, 1979 (NLSY79), the study for the first time models a possible simultaneous relationship among these four variables and estimates these equations by an appropriate two‐stage procedure. Our results indicate that the worker's wage is positively related to these psychological variables. This finding has important policy implications and thus it calls for future research in this direction.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "Role of Psychological Variables in the Determination of the Worker's Wage: Further Evidence from the United States." Australian Economic Papers 58,1 (March 2019): 54-77.
10. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
What Determines Happiness? Income or Attitude: Evidence from the U.S. Longitudinal Data
Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics 7,2 (June 2014): 80-102.
Also: http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=search.searchResults&id=629D6E8D-F7EE-3F6E-E295-C53651D262E7
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Keyword(s): Attitudes; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Income

Using the data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a longitudinal data set from the United States, this study demonstrates that the covariates of happiness differ to some extent between matured adults and young-adults and that the relationship of personal happiness with positive attitude is stronger than that with any other covariate of happiness known in the literature including income. These results remain robust to changes in estimation techniques in response to varying assumptions on the attitude variable. Assuming endogeneity of the attitude variable, the study estimates happiness and positive attitude equations simultaneously by a two-stage procedure and obtains interesting new results. These results indicate that positive attitude is not only a covariate of happiness, but also a determinant of happiness, especially in the sample of matured adults. To increase the personal happiness therefore the study recommends policies designed to help individuals not only increase their incomes, but also improve their attitudes.
(PsycINFO Database Record © 2014 APA, all rights reserved)
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan. "What Determines Happiness? Income or Attitude: Evidence from the U.S. Longitudinal Data." Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics 7,2 (June 2014): 80-102.
11. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Finney, Miles M.
Evidence on the Effect of Young Adults' Wages on their College Attendance Decisions
Applied Economics Letters 4,12 (December 1997): 733-735.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/758528717
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): College Enrollment; Employment, Youth; Wages, Youth

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this note demonstrates that the college attendance decision of employed young adults depends partly on their wage. We further find that the wage quadratically impacts the decision to attend college.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan and Miles M. Finney. "Evidence on the Effect of Young Adults' Wages on their College Attendance Decisions." Applied Economics Letters 4,12 (December 1997): 733-735.
12. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Ullah, Aman
Direct and Indirect Effects of Happiness on Wage: A Simultaneous Equations Approach
Journal of Socio-Economics 41,2 (April 2012): 143-152.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053535711001569
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism); Income Level; Schooling; Wage Equations

Using data from the United States National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and following a two-stage method, the current study estimates wage, schooling and happiness equations simultaneously and demonstrates that happiness affects the worker's wage not only directly, but also indirectly through its direct effect on years of schooling. The simultaneous relation between happiness and schooling demonstrated in this study further suggests that schooling also affects wage both directly and indirectly through happiness. The study supports the argument presented in several earlier studies that higher income does not necessarily guarantee higher levels of happiness.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan and Aman Ullah. "Direct and Indirect Effects of Happiness on Wage: A Simultaneous Equations Approach." Journal of Socio-Economics 41,2 (April 2012): 143-152.
13. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan
Ullah, Aman
Why Does Growing up in an Intact Family during Childhood Lead to Higher Earnings during Adulthood in the United States?
American Journal of Economics and Sociology 71,3 (July 2012): 662-695.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1536-7150.2012.00828.x/full
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Inc.
Keyword(s): Earnings; Educational Attainment; Families, Two-Parent; Family Characteristics; Family Structure; Happiness (see Positive Affect/Optimism)

With a view to finding an explanation of the observed differences in adult annual earnings between workers raised in intact (INTACT) and non-intact families in the US labor market, this study tests two hypotheses. First, workers growing up in intact families during childhood earn more during their adulthood because they acquire more years of schooling, which in turn affect their wages positively. Second, intact family background acts as an instrument for numerous factors that contribute to workers' happiness during adulthood. Since happier workers, with other characteristics held constant, are known to have higher earnings, workers raised in intact families during childhood by leading a relatively happier life during their adulthood earn more than their otherwise identical non-intact counterparts. Both these hypotheses find strong support from the US data. The evidence of simultaneous relationships between wage and happiness and between happiness and schooling confirms that the true effect of INTACT on wage may be much larger than what is envisaged by a simple one-step process. Regardless of whether this relationship is due to causation or correlation, the study simply demonstrates that the US evidence of higher earnings associated with workers raised in intact families may be attributed partly to their higher levels of schooling and happier lives. By demonstrating a significant positive relationship between the stability of parental family structure during childhood and earnings during adulthood, the current study highlights the importance of responsible parenthood as a means of improving the child's future economic performance.
Bibliography Citation
Mohanty, Madhu Sudan and Aman Ullah. "Why Does Growing up in an Intact Family during Childhood Lead to Higher Earnings during Adulthood in the United States?" American Journal of Economics and Sociology 71,3 (July 2012): 662-695.