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Author: Nickoll, Rebecca A.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Nickoll, Rebecca A.
The Effects of Parental Work Characteristics and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, Summer 1995.
Also: http://books.google.com/books/about/The_Effects_of_Parental_Work_Characteris.html?id=xNtcNwAACAAJ
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Child Health; Cognitive Development; Gender Differences; Marital Status; Maternal Employment; Mothers; Mothers, Education; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Underemployment

This study examines how parental work characteristics as well as maternal nonemployment affect children's reading and math achievement. I argue that parents who perform complex work will encourage self-direction and cognitive achievement in their children. My sample consists of children 9-12 years-old in 1992 (N=1067) from the 1992 NLSY Merged Child-Mother Data who have valid scores on the Reading Recognition and Math Peabody Individual Achievement Tests. Child background characteristics, as well as maternal cognitive skills and spouse's education are important predictors of both reading and math outcomes. Results show that the effects of maternal nonemployment vary by maternal education, child sex, and marital status, while the effects of maternal occupational complexity vary by child sex and extent of employment. Finally, I suggest possible avenues for future research.
Bibliography Citation
Nickoll, Rebecca A. The Effects of Parental Work Characteristics and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement. M.A. Thesis, The Ohio State University, Summer 1995..
2. Nickoll, Rebecca A.
Parcel, Toby L.
The Effects of Parental Work Characteristics and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Cognitive Development; Divorce; Marital Status; Marriage; Maternal Employment; Parent-Child Relationship/Closeness; Parental Influences; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Merged Child-Mother Data of children ages 9-12 (N = 1,067) who have valid scores on the Reading & Math Peabody Individual Achievement Tests, examines how parental work characteristics & maternal nonemployment affect children's reading & math achievement, arguing that parents who perform complex work will encourage self-direction & cognitive achievement in their children. It is found that child background characteristics, as well as maternal cognitive skills & spouse's education, are important predictors of both reading & math outcomes. Results also show that the effects of maternal nonemployment vary by maternal education, child sex, & marital status, while the effects of maternal occupational complexity vary by child sex & the extent of employment. Possible avenues for future research are suggested. (Copyright 1996, Sociological Abstracts, Inc., all rights reserved.)
Bibliography Citation
Nickoll, Rebecca A. and Toby L. Parcel. "The Effects of Parental Work Characteristics and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement." Presented: New York, NY, American Sociological Association, August 1996.
3. Parcel, Toby L.
Nickoll, Rebecca A.
Dufur, Mikaela J.
The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement
Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.
Also: http://wox.sagepub.com/content/23/4/461.abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Birthweight; Child Health; Children, Academic Development; Cognitive Development; Education; Maternal Employment; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

James Coleman's theory regarding family social capital and Mel Kohn's ideas regarding work and personality suggest that parental work may affect child cognition. Using a sample of 1,067 nine- to twelve-year-old children of working and non-working mothers from the 1992 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother data set, it was found that the most important determinants of children's reading and math achievement were characteristics of the children and parents themselves. Paternal work hours had some effects on math achievement, and maternal work influenced reading achievement under some conditions. Policies allowing parents of either sex to schedule work flexibly may facilitate child cognitive achievement. Copyright Sage Publications Inc. 1996. Fulltext online. Photocopy available from ABI/INFORM.
Bibliography Citation
Parcel, Toby L., Rebecca A. Nickoll and Mikaela J. Dufur. "The Effects of Parental Work and Maternal Nonemployment on Children's Reading and Math Achievement." Work and Occupations 23,4 (November 1996): 461-483.