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Author: Nsiah, Christian
Resulting in 6 citations.
1. Debeaumont, Ronald
Nsiah, Christian
Do Unions Reduce the Wage Penalty Experienced by Obese Women?
Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 281-290.
Also: http://econpapers.repec.org/article/eblecbull/eb-14-00865.htm
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Economics Bulletin
Keyword(s): Collective Bargaining; Obesity; Unions; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Unions have been shown to reduce wage inequality, thus resulting in higher wages for certain disadvantaged groups. Overweight individuals, especially women, generally receive lower wages than thinner individuals with similar socioeconomic characteristics. This paper demonstrates that union wage protection extends to overweight women in the U.S. Specifically, obese women do not experience a wage penalty when employed in jobs covered by collective bargaining.
Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald and Christian Nsiah. "Do Unions Reduce the Wage Penalty Experienced by Obese Women?" Economics Bulletin 36,1 (2016): 281-290.
2. Debeaumont, Ronald
Nsiah, Christian
Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work
Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/420208h88t521747/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Labor Market Segmentation; Shift Workers; Unemployment; Wage Determination; Wage Differentials; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compensating wages have been documented for a number of job attributes including working non-standard hours. Using data that aggregates across occupations, our analysis confirms a wage premium for working night shifts. However, the compensating wage is greater in areas where unemployment is low, suggesting that employers are less pressured to compensate for night shifts when employment opportunities are relatively scarce. If this result holds for other undesirable work characteristics, such as risk of death on the job, then weak labor markets will have lower compensating wages in general. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Journal of Economics & Finance is the property of Springer Science & Business Media B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Debeaumont, Ronald and Christian Nsiah. "Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work ." Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.
3. Joshi, Prathibha V.
Beck, Kris A.
Nsiah, Christian
Student Characteristics Affecting the Decision to Enroll in a Community College: Economic Rationale
Community College Journal of Research and Practice 33,10 (October 2009): 805-822.
Also: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/35385971-3612364/content~db=all~content=a914111976~tab=content~order=page
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Routledge ==> Taylor & Francis (1998)
Keyword(s): Academic Development; College Education; College Enrollment; Employment, In-School; Family Background; Family Income; School Performance

This study employed a probit model to examine determinants of U.S. college students' choice of attendance at two-year community colleges compared to a four-year college. The empirical work was based on the latest National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). The set of explanatory variables included academic performance, students' involvement in work outside of school, family characteristics, and demographic variables. The marginal effects indicate that students choosing to go to a community college compared to a four-year college are more likely to work longer hours when in college, have lower academic performance, and come from lower income family background. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

Copyright of Community College Journal of Research & Practice is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Bibliography Citation
Joshi, Prathibha V., Kris A. Beck and Christian Nsiah. "Student Characteristics Affecting the Decision to Enroll in a Community College: Economic Rationale ." Community College Journal of Research and Practice 33,10 (October 2009): 805-822.
4. Nsiah, Christian
Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work
Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12197-009-9093-3
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Labor Market Demographics; Shift Workers; Wage Rates; Work Hours; Work, Atypical

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Compensating wages have been documented for a number of job attributes including working non-standard hours. Using data that aggregates across occupations, our analysis confirms a wage premium for working night shifts. However, the compensating wage is greater in areas where unemployment is low, suggesting that employers are less pressured to compensate for night shifts when employment opportunities are relatively scarce. If this result holds for other undesirable work characteristics, such as risk of death on the job, then weak labor markets will have lower compensating wages in general.
Bibliography Citation
Nsiah, Christian. "Unemployment and Compensating Wages: An Analysis of Shift Work ." Journal of Economics and Finance 34,2 (April 2010): 142-149.
5. Nsiah, Christian
DeBeaumont, Ronald
Ryerson, Annette
Motherhood and Earnings: Wage Variability by Major Occupational Category and Earnings Level
Journal of Family and Economic Issues 34,2 (June 2013): 224-234.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10834-012-9323-2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Earnings; Maternal Employment; Motherhood; Occupations; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Prior research has indicated that women with children earn less than their childless counterparts. In addition, recent research has found that the motherhood wage penalty may be most severe for low-income earners. Using panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), we test two hypotheses. First, are there occupational differences in the motherhood wage penalty? Second, are there occupational differences in the relative wage penalty experienced by low and high wage mothers? Our results indicated that mothers in sales occupations are penalized at a significantly higher rate than mothers in non-sales occupations, while mothers in blue-collar occupations were penalized the least. Furthermore, the wage cost of motherhood was greatest amongst the highest earners in sales occupations.
Bibliography Citation
Nsiah, Christian, Ronald DeBeaumont and Annette Ryerson. "Motherhood and Earnings: Wage Variability by Major Occupational Category and Earnings Level." Journal of Family and Economic Issues 34,2 (June 2013): 224-234.
6. Nsiah, Christian
Joshi, Prathibha V.
The Academic Cost of Being Overweight: Rural vs. Urban Area Differences - A Quantile Regression Approach
Research in Higher Education Journal 4 (September 2009): 91-103.
Also: http://www.aabri.com/manuscripts/09233.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academic and Business Research Institute
Keyword(s): Behavioral Problems; Modeling; Obesity; Psychological Effects; Rural/Urban Differences; Self-Esteem; Variables, Instrumental; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The number of overweight youth has more than doubled since the early 1970s. According to the Center for Disease Control, approximately 13 percent of children and adolescents are seriously overweight. Obesity among adolescents has been linked with behavioral and psychological problems, affecting adolescent socialization, self-esteem, and performance in all facets of life. Using data from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we employ ordinary least squares, instrumental variables, and quantile regression models to investigate how being overweight can impact a youth's education performance measured as actual credit weighted grade point average. Overall, we find a negative relationship between being overweight and GPA. We also find that the negative relationship is more pronounced in urban areas than in rural areas. The quantile regression estimate indicates that the magnitude of the relationship between youth's GPA and being overweight depends on the GPA quantile in question.
Bibliography Citation
Nsiah, Christian and Prathibha V. Joshi. "The Academic Cost of Being Overweight: Rural vs. Urban Area Differences - A Quantile Regression Approach." Research in Higher Education Journal 4 (September 2009): 91-103.