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Author: Penner, Anna
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Penner, Anna
Risk Behaviors Among Children and Youth Who Have a Sibling With a Disability
Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Behavior; Contraception; Disability; Risk-Taking; Siblings; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults, this paper examines risk behaviors among children (ages 10-14) and youth (15 and older) who have had a sibling with a disability (SWD). Current estimates maintain that one in eight American families have a child with a disability, suggesting that a significant portion of our children have a SWD, and yet little research examines their experiences using nationally representative data. I investigate whether respondents with SWDs engage in risk behaviors more than those whose siblings are not disabled. I find that, on average, the reports are similar, and if anything respondents with a SWD engage in more risk behaviors, not fewer. In particular, contraceptive use is lower among youth with a SWD and physical harm to others is higher among children with a SWD.
Bibliography Citation
Penner, Anna. "Risk Behaviors Among Children and Youth Who Have a Sibling With a Disability." Presented: Denver CO, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2018.
2. Penner, Anna
The Effect of Having a Disabled Sibling at Various Ages on Educational Attainment
Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Disability; Educational Attainment; Educational Outcomes; Gender Differences; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults to examine the educational attainment of young adults who had a disabled sibling during childhood. Building on child development literature, I consider various ages when having a disabled sibling may be particularly deleterious. Over all I find that respondents who had a disabled sibling as a child complete half a year less schooling and have substantially lower odds of graduating from high school than their peers who did not have a disabled sibling. Further, there are some ages when having a disabled sibling has a greater effect on educational outcomes. These effects are driven almost entirely by the costs of having a disabled sibling for women: men experience little or no penalty for having a disabled sibling, while women with disabled siblings average half a year less education than women without disabled siblings.
Bibliography Citation
Penner, Anna. "The Effect of Having a Disabled Sibling at Various Ages on Educational Attainment." Presented: Boston MA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, May 2014.
3. Penner, Anna
The Effects of Having a Disabled Sibling during Childhood on Young Adults’ Educational Attainment
Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Health; Disability; Educational Attainment; Health, Chronic Conditions; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper utilizes secondary data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults (CNLSY) to examine educational attainment among young adults who had a disabled sibling during childhood by measuring high school completion and number of years of education achieved. I also examine the gender differences in these outcomes. This study builds on previous research regarding disability effects and offers an additional view on sibling effects in general. I find that on average, respondents who had a disabled sibling complete half a year less schooling and have substantially lower odds of graduating from high school than their peers who did not have a disabled sibling. The gap in educational attainment is particularly important to consider in light of policies that should be implemented to avoid unnecessary loss in educational attainment, particularly in light of further cuts that may be made in this time of financial austerity.
Bibliography Citation
Penner, Anna. "The Effects of Having a Disabled Sibling during Childhood on Young Adults’ Educational Attainment." Presented: New Orleans LA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2013.
4. Penner, Anna
The Impact of Family Adversity: Behavioral Outcomes of Having a Disabled Sibling during Childhood
Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Behavior; Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Children, Behavioral Development; Disability; Siblings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing secondary data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Children and Young Adults, this paper examines behavioral outcomes among children (ages 4-14) who have had a disabled sibling. Current estimates maintain that more than one in eight American families have a disabled child, suggesting that a substantial portion of our children have a disabled sibling, and yet little sociological literature examines their experiences using nationally representative data. I investigate whether children with disabled siblings are at greater risk for behavioral problems during their childhood than children whose siblings are not disabled, and find that, on average, children with a disabled sibling have more reports of behavioral problems than children whose siblings are not disabled. Any gap that shows these children are at greater risk for behavioral problems and delinquency is important to note—if we can support these children early on and give them tools to cope and excel, then we may decrease the aid they require as they enter adolescence and adulthood.
Bibliography Citation
Penner, Anna. "The Impact of Family Adversity: Behavioral Outcomes of Having a Disabled Sibling during Childhood." Presented: Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017.