Search Results

Author: Silver, Ian A.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Silver, Ian A.
D'Amato, Christopher
The Within-individual Lagged Effects of Time Spent Incarcerated on Substance Use: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study from the United States
Journal of Substance Use published online (9 December 2021): DOI: 10.1080/14659891.2021.2006336.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14659891.2021.2006336
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Incarceration/Jail; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Background: The effects of incarceration on future substance use is well documented in the extant literature. Nevertheless, scholars have yet to examine the within-individual correspondence between the change in months incarcerated over time and the change in substance use over time.

Aim: Considering this gap in the literature, the purpose of the current study is to evaluate whether within-individual changes in months incarcerated is associated with subsequent within-individual changes in substance use.

Method: The current study examines the influence of the change in the number months incarcerated (2004-2009) on alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, and hard drug use (2005-2010) using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97). The within-individual effects were estimated using four lagged latent growth models.

Result: The results demonstrated that within-individual change in the months spent incarcerated influenced the change in the likelihood of substance use over time. Within-individual increases in the number of months an individual spent incarcerated over time (2004-2009) was associated with within-individual decreases in the frequency of cigarette and marijuana use, but within-individual increases in the likelihood of hard drug use from 2005 to 2010.

Bibliography Citation
Silver, Ian A. and Christopher D'Amato. "The Within-individual Lagged Effects of Time Spent Incarcerated on Substance Use: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study from the United States." Journal of Substance Use published online (9 December 2021): DOI: 10.1080/14659891.2021.2006336.
2. Silver, Ian A.
D'Amato, Christopher
Wooldredge, John
The Cycle of Reentry and Reincarceration: Examining the Influence on Employment over a Period of 18 Years
Journal of Criminal Justice 74 (May-June 2021): 101812.
Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047235221000325
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Employment; Incarceration/Jail

Methods: Using the NLSY97 birth cohort, the current study evaluated the influence of time spent incarcerated (an approximation of the reentry-reincarceration cycle) on future employment outcomes over an 18-year period. Specifically, two cross-lagged panel models were estimated to examine the between-individual effects of the number of months incarcerated on employment and the number of weeks employed, while two lagged latent growth models were estimated to examine the within-individual effects.

Results: In addition to suggesting that the reentry-reincarceration cycle exists, the findings illustrated that the reentry-reincarceration cycle influences between-individual differences on employment outcomes and within-individual changes in employment outcomes over time.

Bibliography Citation
Silver, Ian A., Christopher D'Amato and John Wooldredge. "The Cycle of Reentry and Reincarceration: Examining the Influence on Employment over a Period of 18 Years." Journal of Criminal Justice 74 (May-June 2021): 101812.
3. Silver, Ian A.
Kelsay, James D.
Examining an Indirect Pathway from the Variety of Stressful Life Events to Violent Victimization through Acquired Psychological Symptoms
Justice Quarterly published online (17 May 2021): DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2021.1916062.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07418825.2021.1916062
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
Keyword(s): Arrests; Bullying/Victimization; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Modeling, Structural Equation; Psychological Effects; Stress

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The effects of stressful life events on violent victimization have been well established. The existing literature, however, remains relatively limited in examining the indirect association between stressful life events and violent victimization through acquired psychological processes. The current study examines the mediating effects of the co-occurrence of negative psychological symptoms (adverse psychological effects) on the association between stressful life events and violent victimization. The results of two structural equation models, estimated using the NLSY 1997 cohort, demonstrate that a variety of stressful life events and violent victimization had a positive indirect effect on violent victimization through adverse psychological effects. The results were only slightly attenuated when self-reported number of arrests was introduced as a covariate of violent victimization in the SEM. The findings suggest that exposure to a variety of stressful life events and violent victimization can influence psychological symptoms and increase subsequent violent victimization.
Bibliography Citation
Silver, Ian A. and James D. Kelsay. "Examining an Indirect Pathway from the Variety of Stressful Life Events to Violent Victimization through Acquired Psychological Symptoms." Justice Quarterly published online (17 May 2021): DOI: 10.1080/07418825.2021.1916062.