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Author: Sommers, David Gerard
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Hayward, Mark D.
Grady, William R.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Sommers, David Gerard
Occupational Influences on Retirement, Disability and Death
Demography 26,3 (August 1989): 393-409.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/92n1655360080128/
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Disabled Workers; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Labor Force Participation; Mortality; Occupations; Retirement

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research examines the alternative mechanisms by which occupations influence the nature and timing of older men's labor force withdrawal. In particular, the authors assess the extent to which occupational factors operate directly and indirectly on exiting events and whether occupations augment or constrain traditional determinants of labor force participation. Based on a discrete-time hazards modeling approach, the results substantiate that the occupational task activities, substantive complexity and physical demands, are key elements of the work environment that are evaluated against the set of non-work alternatives. In the case of retirement, these aspects of occupational attractiveness function as a dominant and direct force in retirement decision-making. With regard to disability, the occupational attribute of substantive complexity operates as an indirect advantage (through higher wage rates) by reducing the risk of a disability exit. Indicators of career continuity also determine the rate of retirement among older workers. Finally, results suggest that financial characteristics and health problems are central to the distribution of older workers across the alternative destination statuses of retirement, disability and death.
Bibliography Citation
Hayward, Mark D., William R. Grady, Melissa A. Hardy and David Gerard Sommers. "Occupational Influences on Retirement, Disability and Death." Demography 26,3 (August 1989): 393-409.
2. Hayward, Mark D.
Grady, William R.
Hardy, Melissa A.
Sommers, David Gerard
Retirement, Disability and Death Among Older Men in the U.S.: The Influence of Occupation
Presented: Chicago, IL, American Statistical Association Annual Meetings, 1987
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: American Statistical Association
Keyword(s): Disabled Workers; Labor Force Participation; Mortality; Occupations; Retirement

This research examines the alternative mechanisms by which occupations influence the nature and timing of older men's labor force withdrawal. In particular, this research assesses the extent to which occupational factors operate directly and indirectly on exiting events and whether occupations augment or constrain traditional determinants of labor force participation. Based on a discrete-time hazards modeling approach, the results substantiate that the occupational task activities, substantive complexity and physical demands, are key elements of the work environment that are evaluated against the set of non-work alternatives. In the case of retirement, these aspects of occupational attractiveness function as a dominant and direct force in the retirement decision- making calculus. With regard to disability, these factors operate directly by defining vocational opportunities. Other occupational attributes such as mandatory retirement regulations and measures of career continuity also are key and direct determinants of the retirement decision.
Bibliography Citation
Hayward, Mark D., William R. Grady, Melissa A. Hardy and David Gerard Sommers. "Retirement, Disability and Death Among Older Men in the U.S.: The Influence of Occupation." Presented: Chicago, IL, American Statistical Association Annual Meetings, 1987.
3. Parnes, Herbert S.
Sommers, David Gerard
Shunning Retirement: Work Experience of Men in Their Seventies and Early Eighties
Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1993
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Human Resource Research
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Employment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income; Labor Force Participation; Retirement; Wives, Work; Work Attachment; Work Experience

Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) of Older Men, this paper examines the extent and character of the work experience of men who opt to continue labor force participation well beyond conventional retirement age. Logistic regression results showed that good health, a strong psychological commitment to work, and a corresponding distaste for retirement are among the most important characteristics related to continued employment into old age. The probability of employment was also found to be positively related to educational attainment and being married to a working wife; it was negatively related to age and level of income in the absence of work. Of the men in the sample who were not working, very few gave evidence of a desire to do so. Policy implications of the findings are explored.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S. and David Gerard Sommers. "Shunning Retirement: Work Experience of Men in Their Seventies and Early Eighties." Working Paper, Center for Human Resource Research, The Ohio State University, 1993.
4. Parnes, Herbert S.
Sommers, David Gerard
Shunning Retirement: Work Experience of Men in Their Seventies and Early Eighties
Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 49,3 (1994): S117-S124
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Gerontological Society of America
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; Educational Attainment; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Income Level; Labor Force Participation; Retirement; Wives, Work; Work Attitudes; Work Experience

Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys (NLS) of Older Men, this study examined the extent and character of the work experience of men who opt to continue labor force participation well beyond conventional retirement age. Logistic regression results showed that good health, a strong psychological commitment to work, and a corresponding distaste for retirement are among the most important characteristics related to continued employment into old age. The probability of employment was also found to be positively related to educational attainment and being married to a working wife; it was negatively related to age and level of income in the absence of work. Of the men in the sample who were not working, very few gave evidence of a desire to do so. Policy implications of the findings are explored.
Bibliography Citation
Parnes, Herbert S. and David Gerard Sommers. "Shunning Retirement: Work Experience of Men in Their Seventies and Early Eighties." Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 49,3 (1994): S117-S124.
5. Sommers, David Gerard
Effects of Labor Market Activity and Financial Resources on the Subjective Well-Being of Older Men
Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1996
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: UMI - University Microfilms, Bell and Howell Information and Learning
Keyword(s): Economic Well-Being; Health, Mental; Health/Health Status/SF-12 Scale; Job Satisfaction; Kinship; Mobility, Labor Market; Retirement

Using data from the older men's cohort of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience, this study examined the effects of labor market activity and financial resources on the subjective well-being of older men. Ordinary least squares regression results showed that the number of hours older men worked in 1989 did not have a significant effect on the satisfaction levels, the depression levels or the morale of respondents. Different combinations of income and asset levels, however, influenced the mental health of older men. Interestingly, job satisfaction had a greater influence on the well-being of employed men than did hours worked or type of occupation. The strongest predictor of well-being for retired men was health status.
Bibliography Citation
Sommers, David Gerard. Effects of Labor Market Activity and Financial Resources on the Subjective Well-Being of Older Men. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1996.