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Author: Stokes, C. Shannon
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Nonoyama, Atsuko
Simpson, Pippa
Gossett, Jeffrey M.
Stokes, C. Shannon
Maternal Employment in Early Childhood and the Risk of Overweight in Adolescence
Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2005
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Child Health; Maternal Employment; Obesity; Weight; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

During the years when childhood obesity increased, types of food consumed by children have also changed drastically due partly to a rise in employment among young mothers who had little time for shopping and cooking nutritious meals. Furthermore, the impact of maternal employment may have been larger in already disadvantaged populations. This study evaluates: 1) whether maternal employment in infancy and early childhood predicts being overweight in adolescence, and 2) whether the effect of maternal employment on adolescent obesity is more pronounced among low-income households. Data come from women in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and their children. Preliminary findings do not indicate that the number of hours mothers worked during the first five years of life predicts elevated risks of obesity at ages 15 or 16, and this finding holds regardless of the poverty status of the household.
Bibliography Citation
Nonoyama, Atsuko, Pippa Simpson, Jeffrey M. Gossett and C. Shannon Stokes. "Maternal Employment in Early Childhood and the Risk of Overweight in Adolescence." Presented: Philadelphia, PA, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2005.
2. Nonoyama, Atsuko
Stokes, C. Shannon
Santell, Ross
Simpson, Pippa
Gossett, Jeffrey M.
Effects of Mother's Employment in Early Childhood on the Risk of Overweight in Adolescence: Regional Comparisons
In: Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Innovation and Development Grants in Economics Program: Executive Report, USDA Economic Research Service Report, US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, October 2006.
Also: http://srdc.msstate.edu/ridge/files/recipients/04_atsuko_final.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Maternal Employment; Obesity; Weight; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study used data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and from the NLSY79 Children and Young Adults. The study estimated whether the average number of hours mothers worked per week during their children's early childhood (measured at 4 years old) affected the children's chances of becoming overweight in adolescence (measured at either 15 or 16). To assess geographic variations in this association, a multivariate logistic regression model was estimated for each of four U.S. regions: Northeast, North Central, South, and West. An indepth analysis was conducted for only the South because it has the highest prevalence of overweight children. The total sample included 1,874 children (777 for the South) born between 1979 and 1985, overrepresenting racial minority and economically disadvantaged groups.

Control variables used in logistic regression models included hours the mother worked during her child's adolescence, mother's body mass index (BMI), whether the mother was a teenager when the child was born, whether the mother was single in the child's early childhood, years of education the mother completed by the time her child became an adolescent, sex and race of the child, household income, and urban residence.

Bibliography Citation
Nonoyama, Atsuko, C. Shannon Stokes, Ross Santell, Pippa Simpson and Jeffrey M. Gossett. "Effects of Mother's Employment in Early Childhood on the Risk of Overweight in Adolescence: Regional Comparisons." In: Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Innovation and Development Grants in Economics Program: Executive Report, USDA Economic Research Service Report, US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, October 2006.