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Author: Sykes, Bryan L.
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Bailey, Amy Kate
Sykes, Bryan L.
Veteran Status, Income, and Intergenerational Mobility Across Three Cohorts of American Men
Population Research and Policy Review 37,4 (August 2018): 539-568.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11113-018-9477-1
Cohort(s): NLSY79, Older Men, Young Men
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Income; Intergenerational Patterns/Transmission; Military Enlistment; Mobility, Social; Veterans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Existing research linking prior military employment with labor market outcomes has focused on comparing the relative income of veterans and nonveterans. However, people who join the armed forces are uniquely selected from the broader population, and the form and direction of selectivity has shifted over time, with differential enlistment rates by race, region, and socioeconomic status. Understanding changes in the demographic composition of enlistees and veterans has significant import for the study of social mobility, particularly given changes in the occupational structure since the mid-twentieth century and wage stagnation well into the new millennium. Furthermore, labor market polarization and increases in educational attainment since WWII raise additional concerns about the social origins of military personnel and their occupational trajectories after discharge. Using data from the National Longitudinal Surveys, we investigate how social background is linked to both income and occupational mobility among veterans from three cohorts of American men: World War II, Vietnam, and the All-Volunteer Force. We find few benefits for veterans, for either income or intergenerational occupational mobility, once social background is controlled, suggesting that selection into the armed forces largely governs outcomes in the civilian labor market. Our findings have significant importance for understanding civilian labor market outcomes and trajectories of social mobility during distinct phases of military staffing.
Bibliography Citation
Bailey, Amy Kate and Bryan L. Sykes. "Veteran Status, Income, and Intergenerational Mobility Across Three Cohorts of American Men." Population Research and Policy Review 37,4 (August 2018): 539-568.
2. Maroto, Michelle Lee
Sykes, Bryan L.
The Varying Effects of Incarceration, Conviction, and Arrest on Wealth Outcomes Among Young Adults
Presented: New Orleans LA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Society of Criminology
Keyword(s): Arrests; Assets; Criminal Justice System; Debt/Borrowing; Home Ownership; Incarceration/Jail; Net Worth; Wealth

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

How do interactions with the criminal justice system influence wealth accumulation among young adults? Previous research using NLSY79 data indicates that incarceration leads to declines in rates of homeownership and net worth among baby boomers, but questions remain as to how other interactions with the criminal justice system affect wealth outcomes. Using data from the 1997 cohort of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we expand on previous work and study how arrests, convictions, and incarceration periods influence a variety of wealth outcomes among younger adults. In particular, we investigate how wealth accumulation between the ages of 25 and 30 varies across individuals with a previous incarceration, conviction, or arrest. We emphasize a broad conception of wealth and include six outcome variables as measures of wealth accumulation: home ownership, total net worth, any financial assets, logged total financial assets, any debt, and logged total debt. Although most interactions with the criminal justice system were negatively associated with future wealth in our preliminary analyses, incarceration presented some of the strongest effects. Our findings lend further support showing that incarceration, along with other interactions with the criminal justice system, can act as absorbing statuses, potentially leading to the accumulation of disadvantage. [Also presented at Montreal, QC, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2017]
Bibliography Citation
Maroto, Michelle Lee and Bryan L. Sykes. "The Varying Effects of Incarceration, Conviction, and Arrest on Wealth Outcomes Among Young Adults." Presented: New Orleans LA, American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting, November 2016.
3. Sykes, Bryan L.
Pettit, Becky
Choice or Constraint? Mass Incarceration and Fertility Outcomes among American Men
Presented: Detroit, MI, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2009.
Also: http://paa2009.princeton.edu/download.aspx?submissionId=91004
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Demography; Fertility; Incarceration/Jail; Racial Differences; Socioeconomic Background

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The rapid growth of the prison system over the last three decades represents a critical institutional intervention in the lives of U.S. families, which may have far-reaching and unintended consequences for demographic processes. In this paper, we investigate how exposure to the criminal justice system affects micro fertility decisions and aggregate fertility patterns. We propose to examine fertility choice and constraint within a counterfactual framework to assess whether and to what extent institutionalization has restricted and lowered the parity of men, and we theorize about how exogenous institutional factors (the penal system) have altered partnership selection in such a way that accounts for observed changes in non-marital, multi-partnered and teenage fertility. Our findings may help to explain growing disparities in fertility patterns by race and class.
Bibliography Citation
Sykes, Bryan L. and Becky Pettit. "Choice or Constraint? Mass Incarceration and Fertility Outcomes among American Men." Presented: Detroit, MI, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, April 2009.