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Author: Taylor, Miles G.
Resulting in 5 citations.
1. Min, Stella
Taylor, Miles G.
Estimating the Effect of Student Loan Debt on Timing of Marriage among Race/Ethnic Groups
Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: American Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Age at First Marriage; Debt/Borrowing; Ethnic Differences; Financial Assistance; Marriage; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Emerging literature suggests student loans are negatively associated with the transition to marriage. Yet, due to historical differences in marital behavior and disproportionate educational financing among non-whites, the consequences of educational debt and family formation are likely to vary by race/ethnicity. To add further complications, selection into student loans is nonrandom, making it difficult to draw strong conclusions concerning the consequences of these loans. Accounting for nonrandom selection into student loans using propensity scores, this study employs discrete time event history models to empirically test the relationship between student loan debt and timing of first marriage among White, Black, and Hispanic college graduates using the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). Postmatching results reveal the negative impact of student loans and marriage primarily affect Hispanic graduates. Hispanic young adults nearly half as likely to marry compared to their counterparts without loans. However, black and white graduates with student loans are more likely to marry than their peers without debt. Our results suggest that student loans uniquely affect race/ethnic groups, advantaging some groups while harming others.
Bibliography Citation
Min, Stella and Miles G. Taylor. "Estimating the Effect of Student Loan Debt on Timing of Marriage among Race/Ethnic Groups." Presented: Seattle WA, American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, August 2016.
2. Min, Stella
Taylor, Miles G.
Racial and Ethnic Variation in the Relationship Between Student Loan Debt and the Transition to First Birth
Demography 55,1 (February 2018): 165-188.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-017-0643-6
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Debt/Borrowing; Ethnic Differences; Modeling, Hazard/Event History/Survival/Duration; Motherhood; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The present study employs discrete-time hazard regression models to investigate the relationship between student loan debt and the probability of transitioning to either marital or nonmarital first childbirth using the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). Accounting for nonrandom selection into student loans using propensity scores, our study reveals that the effect of student loan debt on the transition to motherhood differs among white, black, and Hispanic women. Hispanic women holding student loans experience significant declines in the probability of transitioning to both marital and nonmarital motherhood, whereas black women with student loans are significantly more likely to transition to any first childbirth. Indebted white women experience only a decrease in the probability of a marital first birth. The results from this study suggest that student loans will likely play a key role in shaping future demographic patterns and behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Min, Stella and Miles G. Taylor. "Racial and Ethnic Variation in the Relationship Between Student Loan Debt and the Transition to First Birth." Demography 55,1 (February 2018): 165-188.
3. Min, Stella
Taylor, Miles G.
Student Loan Debt and Race Ethnic Variation in Timing of First Birth
Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): College Graduates; Debt/Borrowing; Fertility; Financial Assistance; First Birth; Propensity Scores; Racial Differences; Student Loans

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Emerging literature indicates a negative association between student loan debt and marriage. However, the impact of student loans on the fertility behavior among young adults is largely unknown. The present study utilizes discrete time event history models to examine the relationship between student loan debt and hazard of first birth among female college graduates using the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97). The results reveal that the effect of student loan debt differs among white and non-white women, and that the relationship is contingent on marital status. Unmarried non-white graduates with student loans are at significantly greater risk of first birth than their counterparts without loans. These results hold even after sensitivity analyses using propensity score matching to correct for selection into student loan debt. The results provide a foundation for deeper investigation into the heterogeneity that exists among college-educated women in terms of their family formation behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Min, Stella and Miles G. Taylor. "Student Loan Debt and Race Ethnic Variation in Timing of First Birth." Presented: Washington DC, Population Association of America Annual Meeting, March-April 2016.
4. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Taylor, Miles G.
Socioeconomic Pathways to Depressive Symptoms in Adulthood: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979
Social Science and Medicine 74,5 (March 2012): 734-743.
Also: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22300713
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Education; Family Income; Health, Mental; Life Course; Modeling, Growth Curve/Latent Trajectory Analysis; Parental Influences; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

The existence of a direct effect of early socioeconomic position (SEP) on adult mental health outcomes net of adult SEP is still debated. This question demands the explicit modeling of pathways linking early SEP to adult SEP and mental health. In light of this background, we pursue two objectives in this study. First, we examine whether depressive symptoms in adulthood can be fit in a trajectory featuring both an intercept, or baseline range of depressive symptoms that varied between individuals, and a slope describing the average evolution of depressive symptoms over the years. Second, we estimate the direct and indirect pathways linking early SEP, respondents’ education and adult household income, with a particular focus on whether early SEP retains a significant direct effect on the trajectory of depressive symptoms once adult SEP is entered into the pathway model. Drawing from 29 years of cohort data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, a survey that has been following a national probability sample of American civilian and military youth (Zagorsky and White, 1999), we used structural equation models to estimate the pathways between parents’ education, respondent’s education, and latent growth curves of household income and depressive symptoms. We found that the effect of parents’ education was entirely mediated by respondent’s education. In turn, the effect of respondent’s education was largely mediated by household income. In conclusion, our findings showed that the socioeconomic attainment process that is rooted in parents’ education and leads to respondent’s education and then to household income is a crucial pathway for adult mental health. These results suggest that increasing educational opportunities may be an effective policy to break the intergenerational transmission of low socioeconomic status and poor mental health.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie and Miles G. Taylor. "Socioeconomic Pathways to Depressive Symptoms in Adulthood: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979." Social Science and Medicine 74,5 (March 2012): 734-743.
5. Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie
Taylor, Miles G.
Park, Alison
Pathways from Parental Education to Adult Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms
Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Education; Fathers, Influence; Growth Curves; Health, Mental; Income; Mothers, Education

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using latent growth curves, we decompose the effects of parental education on trajectories of depressive symptoms (DS) in adulthood into direct and indirect effects mediated by respondents' education and trajectories of income in adulthood. Data come from the NLSY79 (N=5,247). Mother's, but not father's, education had a direct effect on the intercept of DS, as each year of maternal education decreased the intercept of DS by 0.10 points (p<0.001). This direct effect declined in both significance (p<0.05) and by 50% in magnitude with the indirect effect through respondents' own education. Finally, the totality of the effect appeared to be indirect when trajectories of income were included. Thus, childhood appears to be a period sensitive to the effects of parents' education, but this effect wanes as individuals progress through the life course and more proximate effects of achieved status (education and income) take precedence.
Bibliography Citation
Quesnel-Vallée, Amélie, Miles G. Taylor and Alison Park. "Pathways from Parental Education to Adult Trajectories of Depressive Symptoms." Presented: Dallas, TX, Population Association of America Meetings, April 2010.