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Author: Trost, Robert P.
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Fishe, Raymond P. H.
Trost, Robert P.
Lurie, Phillip M.
Labor Force Earnings, and College Choice of Young Women: An Examination of Selectivity Bias and Comparative Advantage
Economics of Education Review 1,2 (Spring 1981): 169-191.
Also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0272775781900431
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Children; College Education; College Graduates; Colleges; Earnings; Educational Returns; I.Q.; Marital Status

A generalized approach to selectivity bias is derived and applied to the joint decision of college attendance and labor force participation for young women. The results here indicate that these decisions are strongly correlated. Moreover, the estimated rate of return to college education is found to be very sensitive to this correlation. This fact suggests that ignoring the relationship between these two decisions leads to rate of return estimates that are biased downward for those who attend college and biased upward for those who do not attend college.
Bibliography Citation
Fishe, Raymond P. H., Robert P. Trost and Phillip M. Lurie. "Labor Force Earnings, and College Choice of Young Women: An Examination of Selectivity Bias and Comparative Advantage." Economics of Education Review 1,2 (Spring 1981): 169-191.
2. Fishe, Raymond P. H.
Trost, Robert P.
Lurie, Phillip M.
Selectivity Bias and Comparative Advantage: A Generalized Approach
Presented: San Diego, CA, Western Economics Association Meetings, 1980
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Western Economic Association International
Keyword(s): Career Patterns; Earnings; Education Indicators; Research Methodology; Selectivity Bias/Selection Bias

The two stage method of multiple decision-making has been generalized and correlation between these decisions has been allowed for. The earnings of young women are studied in this expanded framework and it is found that comparative advantage exists in this NLS data set. In addition, the estimates of the conditional wage equations generally support the argument that these women are making income maximizing choices, which has been an implicit assumption in most of the literature on female labor force participation.
Bibliography Citation
Fishe, Raymond P. H., Robert P. Trost and Phillip M. Lurie. "Selectivity Bias and Comparative Advantage: A Generalized Approach." Presented: San Diego, CA, Western Economics Association Meetings, 1980.
3. Trost, Robert P.
The Value of Stable Employment as Inferred from Market Wages
Report, The Public Research Institute, A Division of the Center for Naval Aanalysis, February 1980.
Also: http://www.cna.org/sites/default/files/research/0204410000.pdf
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Center for Naval Analysis
Keyword(s): Employment; Industrial Sector; Layoffs; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper estimates the value employees place on stable employment. Here the term 'stable employment' means a relatively low probability of temporary and/or permanent layoff. This value is estimated by regressing individual wage rates on exogenous variables and proxy variables for unstable employment. The sign and size of the coefficients on these proxy variables in the wage equation measures the value of stable employment in terms of hourly wage rate. The wage equation is estimated using the Michigan and Older Men's survey data. The results indicate that the wage elasticity with respect to instability is. 3. This means that if one industry is 50 percent more stable than another, then other things equal, the more stable industry would have a 15 percent lower wage rate.
Bibliography Citation
Trost, Robert P. "The Value of Stable Employment as Inferred from Market Wages." Report, The Public Research Institute, A Division of the Center for Naval Aanalysis, February 1980.
4. Trost, Robert P.
Lee, Lung-Fei
Technical Training and Earnings: A Polychotomous Choice Model with Selectivity
Review of Economics and Statistics 66,1 (February 1984): 151-156.
Also: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1924708
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Keyword(s): Educational Returns; Schooling; Vocational Education; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper presents a model with polychotomous choices and selectivity and then applies it to the problem of estimating the returns to technical school training. Using the NLS of Young Men, the paper finds evidence of self-selectivity in the high school wage equation and estimates the wage effect of technical school to be a $1. 27 per hour increase in wages. This amounts to an estimated rate of return of 9 to 11. 2%, which is slightly higher than estimates obtained by others. Without corrections for selectivity bias, the rate of return is underestimated by 6%.
Bibliography Citation
Trost, Robert P. and Lung-Fei Lee. "Technical Training and Earnings: A Polychotomous Choice Model with Selectivity." Review of Economics and Statistics 66,1 (February 1984): 151-156.