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Author: Weinshenker, Matthew
Resulting in 2 citations.
1. Weinshenker, Matthew
Employment and Earnings across the Transition to Fatherhood: A Life Course Perspective
Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
Also: http://paa2007.princeton.edu/abstractViewer.aspx?submissionId=70568
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Population Association of America
Keyword(s): Earnings; Employment; Fatherhood; Fathers; Gender; Life Course; Marriage; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Existing studies support the hypotheses that married fathers are likely to work longer hours for pay than their childless counterparts, and to earn more money. In this study, I draw upon the life course perspective in asking whether married men respond to becoming fathers for the first time in the same way regardless of the age at which fertility takes place. Fitting fixed effects models to data from the NLSY79, I test several competing hypotheses particularly focused upon delayed fathers, or those who become first-time parents in their thirties and after. Preliminary findings suggest that while delayed fathers' employment and earnings are not affected by parenthood, there is a significant (but small) disjunction among older men based on their attitudes toward gender egalitarianism. The results appear to have implications for the study of work-family linkages and for discussions of delayed fathers and the "new fatherhood".
Bibliography Citation
Weinshenker, Matthew. "Employment and Earnings across the Transition to Fatherhood: A Life Course Perspective." Presented: New York, NY, Population Association of America Annual Meetings, March 29-31, 2007.
2. Weinshenker, Matthew
The Effect of Fatherhood on Employment Hours: Variation by Birth Timing, Marriage, and Coresidence
Journal of Family Issues 36,1 (January 2015): 3-30.
Also: http://jfi.sagepub.com/content/36/1/3.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Sage Publications
Keyword(s): Coresidence; Fatherhood; First Birth; Marital Status; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Drawing on the life course paradigm, I assess how the effect of fatherhood on employment hours varies by age of becoming a parent and time elapsed since the birth. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Cohort from 1979 to 2002 (N = 28,514 observations), separate effects are estimated based on fathers' marital status and coresidence with own children. Only unmarried men who became fathers before 24 years work longer hours immediately after a first birth, but in the long run, most early fathers work fewer hours as a result of parenthood. Over time, unmarried but coresident men who became fathers between 24 and 29 years increase their hours, as do married, coresident men who delayed fatherhood until 30 years or older. However, the latter increase is moderated by support for egalitarian gender roles. The findings shed light on the contemporary transition to adulthood and on men's work-family balance.
Bibliography Citation
Weinshenker, Matthew. "The Effect of Fatherhood on Employment Hours: Variation by Birth Timing, Marriage, and Coresidence." Journal of Family Issues 36,1 (January 2015): 3-30.