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Author: Whyman, Mira
Resulting in 4 citations.
1. Lemmon, Megan
Whyman, Mira
Teachman, Jay D.
Active-Duty Military Service in the United States: Cohabiting Unions and the Transition to Marriage
Demographic Research 20,10 (February 2009). DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2009.20.10.
Also: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol20/10/20-10.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research
Keyword(s): All-Volunteer Force (AVF); Cohabitation; Marriage; Military Service; Undergraduate Research

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A small but growing body of research has begun to identify the consequences of military service during the all-voluntary era. Previous literature has emphasized the role played by the economic prospects of men in stimulating marriage, among both singles and cohabiters. Military service and marriage are related through pay rates, stability of employment and additional benefits awarded to married couples. In this article, we examine the relationship between military service and the likelihood that cohabiting unions will be converted into marriages. Our paper extends previous research by making a distinction between the effects of active-duty verses reserve-duty service on the transition to marriage using data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Our findings indicate that there is a positive relationship between active-duty service and cohabitors transitioning to marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Lemmon, Megan, Mira Whyman and Jay D. Teachman. "Active-Duty Military Service in the United States: Cohabiting Unions and the Transition to Marriage." Demographic Research 20,10 (February 2009). DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2009.20.10.
2. Lemmon, Megan
Whyman, Mira
Teachman, Jay D.
Active-Duty Military Service, Cohabiting Unions, and the Transition to Marriage
Presented: Portland, OR, Pacific Sociological Association annual meeting, April 2008
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Pacific Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Cohabitation; Marriage; Military Service; Undergraduate Research

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A small but growing body of research has begun to identify the consequences of military service during the all-voluntary era. Previous literature has emphasized the role played by the economic prospects of men in stimulating marriage, among both singles and cohabiters. Military service and marriage are related through pay rates, stability of employment and additional benefits awarded to married couples. In this article, we examine the relationship between military service and the likelihood that cohabiting unions will be converted into marriages. Our paper extends previous research by making a distinction between the effects of active-duty verses reserve-duty service on the transition to marriage using data from the 1979-2004 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Our findings indicate that there is a positive relationship between active-duty service and cohabitors transitioning to marriage.
Bibliography Citation
Lemmon, Megan, Mira Whyman and Jay D. Teachman. "Active-Duty Military Service, Cohabiting Unions, and the Transition to Marriage." Presented: Portland, OR, Pacific Sociological Association annual meeting, April 2008.
3. Whyman, Mira
Lemmon, Megan
Teachman, Jay D.
Non-Combat Military Service in the United States and its Effects on Depression
Presented: San Diego, CA, Medical Sociology Undergraduate Roundtable Session, Pacific Sociological Association meeting, April, 2009
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Pacific Sociological Association
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Marriage; Military Service; Undergraduate Research

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Scheduled for presentation at the Western Washington University, Scholars Week--Sociology Program, May, 2009.

A large body of research has established that military service can have a negative effect on soldiers, especially when they have been exposed to combat, resulting in PTSD and a wide range of other mental health problems. However, very little research examines what positive effect non-combat military service can have on mental health, and more specifically depression. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) we show that men who serve on active duty, and do not see combat, are less likely to experience depression than their civilian and reserve duty counterparts. We suggest that it is the high level of social support available to men serving on active duty that buffers the stresses they experience and therefore reduces the likelihood of an individual developing depression. In addition, veterans enjoy more advantages family life course histories.

Bibliography Citation
Whyman, Mira, Megan Lemmon and Jay D. Teachman. "Non-Combat Military Service in the United States and its Effects on Depression." Presented: San Diego, CA, Medical Sociology Undergraduate Roundtable Session, Pacific Sociological Association meeting, April, 2009.
4. Whyman, Mira
Lemmon, Megan
Teachman, Jay D.
Non-Combat Military Service in the United States and Its Effects on Depressive Symptoms Among Men
Social Science Research 40,2 (March 2011): 695-703. also: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X10002863
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Academic Press, Inc.
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Health, Mental; Military Service; Stress; Veterans

A large body of research has established that combat has negative effects on the mental health of soldiers, resulting in PTSD and a wide range of related mental health problems. However, very little research examines what effects non-combat military service may have on the mental health of men. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) we show that men who serve on active duty, and do not see combat, are less likely to experience depressive symptoms than their nonveteran and reserve duty counterparts, although this effect tends to dissipate after discharge from the military. We suggest several mechanisms through which active duty military service may act to reduce the likelihood of developing depressive symptoms. [Copyright © Elsevier]
Bibliography Citation
Whyman, Mira, Megan Lemmon and Jay D. Teachman. "Non-Combat Military Service in the United States and Its Effects on Depressive Symptoms Among Men." Social Science Research 40,2 (March 2011): 695-703.