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Author: Zimmer, David M.
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Cress, Justin R.
Zimmer, David M.
Medical Savings Accounts and Preventative Health Care Utilization
Journal of Economics and Management 7,1 (January 2011): 1-22.
Also: http://www.jem.org.tw/content/pdf/Vol.7No.1/01.pdf
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Economic Association
Keyword(s): Endogeneity; Health Care; Insurance, Health; Savings

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Introduced during the late 1990s, medical savings accounts (MSAs) increase cost sharing between employers and employees. Despite assurances from proponents claiming cost sharing will stem the tide of rising health care prices and expenditures, skeptics argue that MSA enrollment could reduce utilization of preventative care. This paper estimates preventative care demand models based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. These models measure the association between MSA enrollment and the utilization of physicals among adults and doctor visits among children. The models control for endogeneity using a variety of techniques. The results indicate that medical savings account enrollment does not significantly impact the utilization of preventative care.
Bibliography Citation
Cress, Justin R. and David M. Zimmer. "Medical Savings Accounts and Preventative Health Care Utilization." Journal of Economics and Management 7,1 (January 2011): 1-22.
2. Welsch, David M.
Zimmer, David M.
Do High School Gifted Programs Lead to Later-in-Life Success?
Journal of Labor Research 39,2 (June 2018): 201-218.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12122-017-9252-9
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): College Degree; Employment; High School Curriculum; High School Transcripts; Income Level

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the effects of participation in gifted education programs, and offers several contributions to existing research. First, this paper studies the effects of high school programs, as opposed to the more commonly-studied elementary and middle school versions. Second, this paper considers impacts of gifted programs on later-in-life socioeconomic success, including college graduation and eventual employment, as opposed to short-run standardized test outcomes. Third, this paper uses sibling fixed effects, coupled with a recently-proposed decomposition method, as an identification approach. The main conclusion is that gifted programs tend to include students who possess traits that already correlate with later-in-life success. After controlling for those traits, gifted programs, per se, show little statistical relationship to later-in-life outcomes.
Bibliography Citation
Welsch, David M. and David M. Zimmer. "Do High School Gifted Programs Lead to Later-in-Life Success?" Journal of Labor Research 39,2 (June 2018): 201-218.
3. Welsch, David M.
Zimmer, David M.
The Effect of Health and Poverty on Early Childhood Cognitive Development
Atlantic Economic Journal 38,1 (March 2010): 37-49.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w20647hx14h16u6v/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Child Health; Cognitive Development; Heterogeneity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although evidence of a link between socioeconomic status and child health has been researched extensively, much less attention has been devoted to studying the link between child health and cognitive development. This paper seeks to determine whether early childhood illnesses and poverty significantly impede cognitive development. The empirical model attempts to control for observed and unobserved heterogeneity through the use of panel data models. Results indicate that a child's cognitive development is not directly related to health problems acquired after birth or socioeconomic standing. Rather, cognitive development is primarily influenced by unobserved child- and family-specific factors that happen to be correlated with health and socioeconomic status. On the other hand, birth weight appears to affect cognitive performance later in childhood, even after taking unobserved heterogeneity into account. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Welsch, David M. and David M. Zimmer. "The Effect of Health and Poverty on Early Childhood Cognitive Development." Atlantic Economic Journal 38,1 (March 2010): 37-49.
4. Zimmer, David M.
Investigating the Dynamic Interdependency between Poverty and Marital Separation
Review of Economics of the Household published online (25 September 2021): DOI: 10.1007/s11150-021-09585-4.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11150-021-09585-4
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Springer
Keyword(s): Heterogeneity; Marital Disruption; Marital Status; Modeling; Poverty

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper investigates the links between poverty and marital separation. In order to account for both unobserved heterogeneity and complex dynamics, the paper builds and estimates a dynamic nonlinear panel model with correlated random effects. The main finding is that a substantial portion of the link between poverty and separation appears to derive spuriously from unobserved factors that affect both outcomes. However, even after accounting for dynamics and unobserved heterogeneity, there remains a strong association between the arrival of poverty and marital separation. The results appear to suggest that poverty and separation often arrive concurrently, though that finding might stem from the relatively course periodicity of large micro household panel surveys. To that end, this paper presents a case for household surveys to adopt more frequent recordings of information.
Bibliography Citation
Zimmer, David M. "Investigating the Dynamic Interdependency between Poverty and Marital Separation." Review of Economics of the Household published online (25 September 2021): DOI: 10.1007/s11150-021-09585-4.
5. Zimmer, David M.
The Effects of Absent Fathers on Adolescent Criminal Activity: An Economic Approach
Journal of Demographic Economics published online (12 October 2021): DOI: 10.1017/dem.2021.26.
Also: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-demographic-economics/article/effects-of-absent-fathers-on-adolescent-criminal-activity-an-economic-approach/F52740881D7DA086087B2A44EB1A8619
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Keyword(s): Crime; Delinquency/Gang Activity; Fathers, Absence

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Simple ordinary least squares estimates indicate that absent fathers boost probabilities of adolescent criminal behavior by 16-38%, but those numbers likely are biased by unobserved heterogeneity. This paper first presents an economic model explaining that unobserved heterogeneity. Then turning to empirics, fixed effects, which attempt to address that bias, suggest that absent fathers reduce certain types of adolescent crime, while lagged-dependent variable models suggest the opposite. Those conflicting conclusions are resolved by an approach that combines those two estimators using an orthogonal reparameterization approach, with model parameters calculated using a Bayesian algorithm. The main finding is that absent fathers do not appear to directly affect adolescent criminal activity. Rather, families with absent fathers possess traits that appear to correlate with increased adolescent criminal behaviors.
Bibliography Citation
Zimmer, David M. "The Effects of Absent Fathers on Adolescent Criminal Activity: An Economic Approach." Journal of Demographic Economics published online (12 October 2021): DOI: 10.1017/dem.2021.26.
6. Zimmer, David M.
The Heterogeneous Impact of Insurance on Health Care Demand among Young Adults: A Panel Data Analysis
Journal of Applied Statistics 45,7 (2018): 1277-1291.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abstract/10.1080/02664763.2017.1369497
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Keyword(s): Health Care; Insurance, Health; Legislation; Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Success of the recently implemented Affordable Care Act hinges on previously uninsured young adults enrolling in coverage. How will increased coverage, in turn, affect health care utilization? This paper applies variable coefficient panel models to estimate the impact of insurance on health care utilization among young adults. The econometric setup, which accommodates nonlinear usage measures, attempts to address the potential endogeneity of insurance status. The main finding is that, for approximately one-fifth of young adults, insurance does not substantially alter health care consumption. On the other hand, another one-fifth of young adults have large moral hazard effects. Among that group, insurance increases the probability of having a routine checkup by 71-120%, relative to mean probabilities, and insurance increases the number of curative-based doctor office visits by 67-181%, relative to the mean number of visits.
Bibliography Citation
Zimmer, David M. "The Heterogeneous Impact of Insurance on Health Care Demand among Young Adults: A Panel Data Analysis." Journal of Applied Statistics 45,7 (2018): 1277-1291.
7. Zimmer, David M.
The Role of Health Insurance in Labor Supply Decisions of Divorced Females
Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 50,2 (May 2010): 121-131.
Also: http://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/quaeco/v50y2010i2p121-131.html
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Elsevier
Keyword(s): Insurance, Health; Labor Economics; Labor Supply; Marital Dissolution

Labor economics literature provides evidence that marital dissolution induces an increase in labor supply of females. This paper explores an explanation for this finding: Marital separation might place wives at risk of losing health insurance or increase the need for expanded health coverage. Thus, wives must increase their labor supply in order to qualify for health benefits. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, results confirm that marital dissolution is associated with increased female labor supply. However, this effect is mostly concentrated among women who were not previously enrolled in their husbands' health insurance plans. For wives who were dependent on their husbands for coverage, continuing coverage laws appear to mitigate the effect of marital dissolution on female labor supply. [Copyright Elsevier]

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Bibliography Citation
Zimmer, David M. "The Role of Health Insurance in Labor Supply Decisions of Divorced Females." Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance 50,2 (May 2010): 121-131.