Search Results

Source: Addiction
Resulting in 7 citations.
1. Fendrich, Michael
Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen
Inconsistencies in Lifetime Cocaine and Marijuana Use Reports: Impact on Prevalence and Incidence
Addiction 90,1 (January 1995): 111-118.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1360-0443.1995.90111114.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Drug Use; Ethnic Differences; Racial Differences; Self-Reporting; Substance Use; Underreporting

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

We evaluated inconsistencies in responses to questions about lifetime cocaine and marijuana use asked of nearly 10,000 respondents from the United States in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth in 1984 and 1988. Our analyses showed that 14% of all responses on cocaine use and 17% of all responses on marijuana use were inconsistent in some way. The types of inconsistencies varied according to the substance; cocaine reports yielded more inconsistencies with regard to timing of first use, while for Marconi most of the inconsistencies were with respect to use disclosure. For both substances, lower level users were more likely to be inconsistent in their reports of drug use. Alternative methods for handling inconsistencies affected estimates of incidence and prevalence. Inconsistencies also varied according to respondent race/ethnicity. Implications of these findings for program evaluation are discussed.
Bibliography Citation
Fendrich, Michael and Mary Ellen Mackesy-Amiti. "Inconsistencies in Lifetime Cocaine and Marijuana Use Reports: Impact on Prevalence and Incidence." Addiction 90,1 (January 1995): 111-118.
2. Harder, Valerie S.
Morral, Andrew R.
Arkes, Jeremy
Marijuana Use and Depression Among Adults: Testing for Causal Associations
Addiction 101,10 (October 2006): 1463-1472.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01545.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Depression (see also CESD); Drug Use; Self-Reporting; Substance Use; Variables, Independent - Covariate

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Aim: To determine whether marijuana use predicts later development of depression after accounting for differences between users and non-users of marijuana. Design: An ongoing longitudinal survey of 12 686 men and women beginning in 1979. Setting: The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth of 1979, a nationally representative sample from the United States. Participants: A total of 8759 adults (age range 29–37 years) interviewed in 1994 had complete data on past-year marijuana use and current depression. Measurements: Self-reported past-year marijuana use was tested as an independent predictor of later adult depression using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies--Depression questionnaire. Individual's propensity to use marijuana was calculated using over 50 baseline covariates. Findings: Before adjusting for group differences, the odds of current depression among past-year marijuana users is 1.4 times higher (95% CI: 1.1, 1.9) than the odds of depression among the non-using comparison group. After adjustment, the odds of current depression among past-year marijuana users is only 1.1 times higher than the comparison group (95% CI: 0.8, 1.7). Similarly, adjustment eliminates significant associations between marijuana use and depression in four additional analyses: heavy marijuana use as the risk factor, stratifying by either gender or age, and using a 4-year lag-time between marijuana use and depression. Conclusions: After adjusting for differences in baseline risk factors of marijuana use and depression, past-year marijuana use does not significantly predict later development of depression. These findings are discussed in terms of their relevance for understanding possible causal effects of marijuana use on depression. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Harder, Valerie S., Andrew R. Morral and Jeremy Arkes. "Marijuana Use and Depression Among Adults: Testing for Causal Associations." Addiction 101,10 (October 2006): 1463-1472.
3. Harford, Thomas C.
Stability and Prevalence of Drinking Among Young Adults
Addiction 88,2 (February 1993): 273-277.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1360-0443.1993.tb00811.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Gender Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This data note draws upon the National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) of Labor Market Experience in Youth beginning at ages 17-24 to describe the stability and prevalence of alcohol use over a 6-year up to ages 23-30. Approximately 70% of men and 58% of women maintained their drinking status throughout the study. The onset of current and heavier drinking decreased with increasing age while the offset of current and heavier drinking increased with increasing age. The absence of current drinking was unrelated to age for both men and women as was the presence of heavier drinking among men.
Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C. "Stability and Prevalence of Drinking Among Young Adults." Addiction 88,2 (February 1993): 273-277.
4. Harford, Thomas C.
The Effects of Order of Questions on Reported Alcohol Consumption
Addiction 89,4 (April 1994): 421-424.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1360-0443.1994.tb00916.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Company ==> Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Data Quality/Consistency; Epidemiology; Research Methodology; Tests and Testing

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research note draws upon the US National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) of Labor Market Experience among youths aged 17-24 to report the effects of variation in the ordering of alcohol questions upon the prevalence of heavier drinking. A secondary analysis of the NLS indicated a substantial decrease in the prevalence of heavier drinking between 1984 and 1985 which is attributed to the order of presentation of two differently styled questions regarding heavier drinking. (PMID, Pub Med., all rights reserved)

Conducted a secondary analysis of data obtained from 12,686 14-21 yr olds in the US National Longitudinal Survey (NLS) of Labor Market Experience to report the effects of variation in the ordering of alcohol questions on the prevalence of heavier drinking. Analysis indicated a substantial decrease in the prevalence of heavier drinking between 1984 and 1985, attributed to the order of presentation of 2 differently styled questions regarding heavier drinking. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

Bibliography Citation
Harford, Thomas C. "The Effects of Order of Questions on Reported Alcohol Consumption ." Addiction 89,4 (April 1994): 421-424.
5. Johnson, Timothy P.
Mott, Joshua Adam
The Reliability of Self-Reported Age of Onset of Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use
Addiction 96,8 (August 2001): 1187-1198.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1360-0443.2001.968118711.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Addiction; Alcohol Use; Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Drug Use; Educational Status; Epidemiology; Gender Differences; Health Factors; Longitudinal Data Sets; Racial Differences; Substance Use

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

AIMS: To examine the reliability of self-reported age of first substance use experiences among national samples of adult and child respondents. DESIGN: Survey responses from seven waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) were examined. PARTICIPANTS: Adult and child NLSY respondents reporting age of first tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and/or crack use during two or more survey interviews. MEASUREMENTS: Four indicators of reliability: intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), mean and absolute mean differences in reported age and reports consistent within 1 year. FINDINGS: The adjusted mean ICC for all comparisons was 0.69. The adjusted mean difference in self-reported age of first substance use was -0.52 years and the adjusted absolute mean difference was 2.00 years. The adjusted percentage of all comparisons reporting ages consistent within 1 year was 55.28%. More consistent reports were provided by adults, and in response to questions posed over 2 years as opposed to longer time intervals. Respondent answers to questions concerned with first use of marijuana were generally found to be most reliable; questions concerned with first use of crack were least reliable and reports of tobacco, alcohol and cocaine were intermediate. Logistic regression analyses also identified age, race, gender, education and poverty status as predictors of consistent reporting. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reports of age of first substance use experiences, as currently collected via survey questionnaires, are of sufficient reliability for most current epidemiological applications. For inquiries where age of substance use onset is itself a research focus, however, researchers should invest additional effort in improving the reliability of measurement.
Bibliography Citation
Johnson, Timothy P. and Joshua Adam Mott. "The Reliability of Self-Reported Age of Onset of Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use." Addiction 96,8 (August 2001): 1187-1198.
6. Kenkel, Donald S.
Lillard, Dean R.
Mathios, Alan D.
Smoke Or Fog? The Usefulness of Retrospectively Reported Information About Smoking
Addiction 98,9 (September 2003):1307-1314.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1360-0443.2003.00445.x/abstract
Cohort(s): Mature Women, NLSY79, Older Men, Young Women
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Addiction; Britain, British; British Household Panel Survey (BHPS); Cigarette Use (see Smoking); Cross-national Analysis; Data Analysis; German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP); Germany, German; National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS); Russia, Russian

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Aims to investigate the reliability and validity of retrospectively reported information on smoking. Design: Nationally representative retrospective data from longitudinal surveys and contemporaneous data from repeated cross-sectional surveys were used. Participants: Adult respondents to three of the four samples of the National Longitudinal Surveys Original Cohort 1966-68; the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979; and various waves of the US National Health Interview Survey. Measurements: Reliability was investigated by calculating kappa statistics for repeated measures of ever-smoking and annual-smoking status. Validity was investigated by comparing smoking prevalence rates generated by retrospective data with contemporaneously measured rates. Findings: Kappa statistics indicated the repeated measures of ever-smoking status show substantial agreement; repeated measures of annual-smoking status show moderate agreement. Retrospective reports on smoking behavior produced prevalence rates that match reasonably well with those from contemporaneous reports of smoking behavior. Conclusions: Retrospective data on smoking can be an important resource for tobacco addiction research. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Kenkel, Donald S., Dean R. Lillard and Alan D. Mathios. "Smoke Or Fog? The Usefulness of Retrospectively Reported Information About Smoking." Addiction 98,9 (September 2003):1307-1314.
7. Wells, Samantha L.
Graham, Kathryn
Speechley, Mark
Koval, John J.
Drinking Patterns, Drinking Contexts and Alcohol-Related Aggression Among Late Adolescent and Young Adult Drinkers
Addiction 100, 7 (July 2005): 933-945.
Also: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2005.001121.x/abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79 Young Adult
Publisher: Wiley Online
Keyword(s): Alcohol Use; Behavior, Antisocial; Behavior, Violent; Gender Differences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The main objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the relative roles of heavy episodic drinking (HED), drinking frequency and drinking volume in explaining alcohol-related aggression and (2) whether drinking context variables (i.e. usual drinking locations, typical drinking companions and extent of peer drinking) confound or modify the relationship between HED and alcohol-related aggression or whether they predict alcohol-related aggression independently. A secondary analysis of the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was conducted. Alcohol-related aggression (denoted fights after drinking) was measured based on self-reports of arguments or fights that occurred during or after drinking in the previous 12 months. A composite sample of drinkers, ages 17-21, from the 1994, 1996 and 1998 Young Adult surveys ( n = 738) was used. Frequency of drinking and drinking volume largely confounded the association between HED and fights after drinking. Usually drinking in public locations away from home versus private locations was found to be significantly associated with a greater likelihood of fights after drinking among females. Among males, usual drinking location modified the relationship between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression, with the greatest risk of aggression for males who drank frequently and usually drank in public locations away from home. Programs designed to reduce drinking frequency in this population and to increase the safety of drinking locations in public places away from home may prove to be beneficial in reducing alcohol-related aggression. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Wells, Samantha L., Kathryn Graham, Mark Speechley and John J. Koval. "Drinking Patterns, Drinking Contexts and Alcohol-Related Aggression Among Late Adolescent and Young Adult Drinkers." Addiction 100, 7 (July 2005): 933-945.