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Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Resulting in 3 citations.
1. Heckman, James J.
Masterov, Dimitriy V.
The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children
Presented: Chicago, IL, T.W. Schultz Award Lecture at the Allied Social Sciences Association Annual Meeting, January 2007.
Also: http://jenni.uchicago.edu/Invest/FILES/dugger_2004-12-02_dvm.pdf
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: American Society for Nutrition (ASN)
Keyword(s): Behavior Problems Index (BPI); Behavioral Problems; Childbearing, Adolescent; Children, Academic Development; Children, Behavioral Development; Children, Home Environment; Crime; Disadvantaged, Economically; Education; Family Environment; Family Structure; Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME); Human Capital; I.Q.; International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS); Labor Market Demographics; Literacy; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Skill Formation

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Education, perseverance and motivation are all major factors determining productivity, both in the workplace and beyond it. The family is a major producer of these skills, which are indispensable for successful students and workers. Unfortunately, many families have failed to perform this task well in recent years. This retards the growth in the quality of the labor force. Dysfunctional families are also a major determinant of child participation in crime and other costly pathological behaviors. On productivity grounds alone, it appears to make sound business sense to invest in young children from disadvantaged environments. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that early childhood interventions are much more effective than remedies that attempt to compensate for early neglect later in life. Enriched pre-kindergarten programs available to disadvantaged children on a voluntary basis, coupled with home visitation programs, have a strong track record of promoting achievement for disadvantaged children, improving their labor market outcomes and reducing involvement with crime. Such programs are likely to generate substantial savings to society and to promote higher economic growth by improving the skills of the workforce.
Bibliography Citation
Heckman, James J. and Dimitriy V. Masterov. "The Productivity Argument for Investing in Young Children." Presented: Chicago, IL, T.W. Schultz Award Lecture at the Allied Social Sciences Association Annual Meeting, January 2007.
2. Jokela, Markus
Kivimäki, Mika
Elovainio, Marko
Lower Fertility Associated with Obesity and Underweight: The US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 88,4 (October 2008): 886-893.
Also: http://www.ajcn.org/content/88/4/886.abstract
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Society for Nutrition (ASN)
Keyword(s): Births, Repeat / Spacing; Childbearing; Expectations/Intentions; Fertility; Obesity; Weight

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that body weight predicts the number of children that a person will have: obese and underweight persons are hypothesized to have fewer children than do their normal-weight counterparts.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to prospectively examine the association between body weight in young adulthood and achieved fertility in later life. DESIGN: A representative national sample of 12 073 American young adults (aged 17-24 y in 1981) were followed through 2004 (19 survey waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth).

RESULTS: Obese young women and men were less likely to have their first child by the age of 47 y than were their normal-weight counterparts [relative risk (RR) = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61, 0.78 in women; RR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66, 0.84 in men). Obesity also predicted a lower probability of having more than one child, particularly for women. These associations were partly explained by a lower probability that obese participants will marry. Underweight men were less likely to have the first, second, third, and fourth child than were normal-weight men (RRs = 0.75-0.88; 95% CIs: 0.61, 0.95). These associations were largely explained by the lower marriage probability of underweight men. Obese women and men and underweight men were less likely to have as many children in adulthood as they had desired as young adults.

CONCLUSIONS: Obesity may be an important risk factor for lower fertility because of its social and possibly biological effect on reproductive behavior. Further data are needed to assess whether this association holds in more recent cohorts.

Bibliography Citation
Jokela, Markus, Mika Kivimäki and Marko Elovainio. "Lower Fertility Associated with Obesity and Underweight: The US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 88,4 (October 2008): 886-893.
3. Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace
Shebl, Fatma M.
Hawley, Nicola L.
Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael
Nutrition Label Use Is Associated with Lower Longer-term Diabetes Risk in US Adults
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 105,5 (May 2017): 1079-1085.
Also: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/105/5/1079/4633977
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: American Society for Nutrition (ASN)
Keyword(s): Health, Chronic Conditions; Nutritional Status/Nutrition/Consumption Behaviors

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Objective: We tested the association between nutrition label use and risk of a future diabetes diagnosis in a multiethnic US cohort.

Design: Data from the ongoing National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (NLSY79) were analyzed. From 2002 (baseline) to 5 follow-up time points (2004-2012), 7150 diabetes-free, multiethnic young adults were prospectively followed for a diagnosis of incident diabetes. Nutrition label use, diabetes diagnosis, time to diabetes diagnosis, and all covariates were self-reported.

Results: Between January 2002 and September 2013, 430 participants (6.0%) were diagnosed with diabetes. A weighted, multivariable, extended Cox regression was conducted, which suggested that in nutrition label users, the HR of diabetes diagnosis risk decreased significantly with time (P-nutrition label use × time interaction < 0.05) compared with risk in nutrition label nonusers.

Bibliography Citation
Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace, Fatma M. Shebl, Nicola L. Hawley and Rafael Pérez-Escamilla. "Nutrition Label Use Is Associated with Lower Longer-term Diabetes Risk in US Adults." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 105,5 (May 2017): 1079-1085.