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Source: Applied Economics
Resulting in 23 citations.
1. Acworth, Alex
De Roos, Nicolas
Katayama, Hajime
Substance Use and Adolescent Sexual Activity
Applied Economics 44,9 (2012): 1067-1079.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036846.2010.534074#preview
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Contraception; Gender Differences; Heterogeneity; Propensity Scores; Sexual Behavior; Substance Use

Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, we examine the relationship between initiating substance use and youth sexual behaviour. We employ a combination of panel data and propensity score matching techniques to control for observed and unobserved heterogeneity. The results indicate striking differences across gender. For males, initiating alcohol or marijuana use is positively and significantly associated with the likelihood of engaging in sexual intercourse and uncontracepted sexual intercourse. For females, in contrast, there is no robust evidence for such links.
Bibliography Citation
Acworth, Alex, Nicolas De Roos and Hajime Katayama. "Substance Use and Adolescent Sexual Activity." Applied Economics 44,9 (2012): 1067-1079.
2. Barron, John M.
Fraedrich, Ann
The Implications of Job Matching for Retirement Health Insurance and Leave Benefits
Applied Economics 26,5 (May 1994): 425-435.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036849400000010
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Benefits, Fringe; Benefits, Insurance; Insurance, Health; Labor Turnover; Modeling, Logit; Retirement; Training, On-the-Job

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A study suggests that differences in fringe benefit packages are related to employer size and to on-the-job training investment. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' 1988 Employee Benefits Survey, a National Institute of Health 1982 employer survey, and the 1989 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth were examined. Logit estimates show that larger firms are more likely to offer retirement health insurance and temporary leaves. Results also indicate that jobs with substantial training are more likely to have fringe benefits such as retirement health insurance, presumably to attract workers with a low propensity for turnover. There is some evidence that jobs with higher training may be less likely to provide leaves, which is consistent with the finding that leave benefits are not directly correlated with worker tenure.
Bibliography Citation
Barron, John M. and Ann Fraedrich. "The Implications of Job Matching for Retirement Health Insurance and Leave Benefits." Applied Economics 26,5 (May 1994): 425-435.
3. Byrne, Dennis M.
Myers, Steven C.
King, Randall H.
Short Term Labour Market Consequences of Teenage Pregnancy
Applied Economics 23,12 (December 1991): 1819-1827.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036849100000171
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Abortion; Educational Attainment; Labor Supply; Pregnancy and Pregnancy Outcomes; Teenagers; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

To determine the impact that teenage pregnancy followed by a birth or an abortion has on labor market success, the relationship between teenage pregnancy and education and the effect of pregnancy on wages are examined. The data are from the NLSY, using 1984 and 1985 survey interview data. The results indicate that a live birth has a negative impact on years of education completed, wages, and labor supply. Young women who undergo abortions complete less schooling, on average, than a similarly aged never-pregnant group, leading to lower wages and less attachment to the labor market. While the greatest educational penalty - 1.8 years - is borne by a teenager who has a baby, the 0.53 year penalty faced by the teenager who aborts is also substantial. These women carry a career penalty into their early 20s in the form of lower education, lower wages, and higher wage elasticities. [ABI/INFORM]
Bibliography Citation
Byrne, Dennis M., Steven C. Myers and Randall H. King. "Short Term Labour Market Consequences of Teenage Pregnancy." Applied Economics 23,12 (December 1991): 1819-1827.
4. Chen, Yu-Hsia
Youth Labour Supply and the Minimum Hours Constraint: The Case of Single Males
Applied Economics 23,1B (January 1991): 229-235.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036849108841067
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Employment, Youth; Labor Supply; Minimum Wage; Wage Effects; Wages, Youth; Work Hours

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Traditionally, economists estimate labor supply functions by assuming that the deserved working hours are the desired working hours. However, if employers require some minimum working hours, for example, 40 hours a week, then the results obtained by the traditional approach will be misleading since the observed working hours might not be the desired working hours. A sample of 1982 NLSY data was used to estimate a youth supply function for models with and without the minimum hours constraint. The hypothesis of no minimum hours constraint was tested. The results show that the hypothesis was rejected at the 1% significance level, indicating that the minimum hours constraint is statistically significant in estimating a labor supply function. As expected, the estimated wage and expected nonlabor income effects on youth labor supply are underestimated and insignificant if the minimum wage constraint is ignored. [ABI/INFORM]
Bibliography Citation
Chen, Yu-Hsia. "Youth Labour Supply and the Minimum Hours Constraint: The Case of Single Males." Applied Economics 23,1B (January 1991): 229-235.
5. Chia, Yee Fei
Dollars and Pounds: The Impact of Family Income on Childhood Weight
Applied Economics 45,14 (2013): 1931-1941.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036846.2011.641929
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Child Health; Family Income; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Modeling, Instrumental Variables; Obesity; Weight

This article examines the impact of family income on childhood weight status for children in the United States using matched mother-child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY 79). Instrumental variable (IV) models, family Fixed Effects (FE) models and family Fixed Effects IV (FEIV) models are estimated in order to control for causality. The results suggest that although the prevalence of childhood obesity is higher in low-income families in the sample, family income might be acting primarily as a proxy for other unobserved characteristics that determine the child's weight status rather having a major direct causative role in determining the child's weight status. Also in: The Applied Economics of Weight and Obesity, Edited by Mark P. Taylor; Routledge, 2013, pp. 57-67.
Bibliography Citation
Chia, Yee Fei. "Dollars and Pounds: The Impact of Family Income on Childhood Weight." Applied Economics 45,14 (2013): 1931-1941.
6. Heiland, Frank
Does the Birth Order Affect the Cognitive Development of a Child?
Applied Economics 41,14 (June 2009): 1799-1818.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840601083220
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79, NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Birth Order; Cognitive Development; Family Size; Family Studies; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT); Siblings

This article investigates the link between position in the birth order and early scholastic ability. Using matched mother-child data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979 cohort, NLSY79), I find that being the first-born is beneficial even after controlling for (nonlinear) effects of family size and child characteristics. The verbal ability of first-borns is about one-tenth of a SD higher than for children in the middle of the birth order. There is no evidence that last-borns fare better than intermediate children. The first-born advantage is confirmed by estimates from within-family variation models and I argue that the findings are consistent with the resource dilution hypothesis. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Heiland, Frank. "Does the Birth Order Affect the Cognitive Development of a Child?" Applied Economics 41,14 (June 2009): 1799-1818.
7. Hersch, Joni
Reagan, Patricia Benton
Job Matching and Women's Wage-Tenure Profile
Applied Economics 26,3 (March 1994): 205-215.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036849400000002
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Job Tenure; Job Turnover; Labor Force Participation; Labor Turnover; Quality of Employment Survey (QES); Wage Gap; Wage Growth; Wages, Women

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The results of a study suggest that discontinuous labor force participation is not likely to be an important determinant of the wage gap between men and women. Three data sets were examined: the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth sample for 1982, the 1977 Quality of Employment Survey, and data from a prior study. Regression results reveal that job matching factors concerning job retention and satisfaction are important determinants of wages. Workers with a good match are more productive in their current jobs than they would be in alternative employment. Such workers are unlikely to receive an alternative wage offer higher than their current wages, so turnover is also lower in good matches. Results also show that previous estimates of returns to tenure are biased downward for women and that women's wages rise with tenure faster than is commonly believed.
Bibliography Citation
Hersch, Joni and Patricia Benton Reagan. "Job Matching and Women's Wage-Tenure Profile." Applied Economics 26,3 (March 1994): 205-215.
8. Johar, Meliyanni
Truong, Jeffrey
Direct and Indirect Effect of Depression in Adolescence on Adult Wages
Applied Economics 46,36 (December 2014): 4431-4444.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00036846.2014.962227#.VFjpSWN2Rlc
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Adolescent health; Depression (see also CESD); Educational Attainment; Health, Mental; Labor Market Outcomes; Wage Penalty/Career Penalty; Wages

It is well recognized that a depressive mental state can persist for a long time, and this can adversely impact labour market outcomes. The aim of this article is to examine the direct association between depression status in late-teenage years and adult wages, as well as the indirect association, operating through accumulated education, experience and occupation choice. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 data, we find adolescent depression is associated with a wage penalty of around 10-15%, but its mechanics are very different for males and females. For males, about three quarters of the wage penalty is through the direct channel, whilst for females the indirect effect channel is dominant. The indirect channel is driven by lower accumulated education, mostly because depression discourages further study post high school. These results are important because they imply that the association between adolescent depression and wages is stronger than has been estimated in previous cross-sectional studies.
Bibliography Citation
Johar, Meliyanni and Jeffrey Truong. "Direct and Indirect Effect of Depression in Adolescence on Adult Wages." Applied Economics 46,36 (December 2014): 4431-4444.
9. Lee, Jin Young
The Upward Trend in Women's College-Going: The Role of Teenagers' Anticipated Future Labour Force Attachment
Applied Economics 50,30 (2018): 3271-3284.
Also: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00036846.2017.1420888
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97, Young Women
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): College Education; Expectations/Intentions; Labor Force Participation

This article focuses on the role of teenagers' anticipated labour force participation in explaining the upward trend in U.S. women's college-going. A simple conceptual model implies that individuals with more anticipated lifetime hours of work are more likely to invest in college education. My analysis using data from three National Longitudinal Surveys supports the theoretical implication. This finding, combined with the trend towards higher work expectations of young women across birth cohorts, may account in part for the upward trends in women's college attendance and completion.
Bibliography Citation
Lee, Jin Young. "The Upward Trend in Women's College-Going: The Role of Teenagers' Anticipated Future Labour Force Attachment." Applied Economics 50,30 (2018): 3271-3284.
10. Lehrer, Evelyn
Log-Linear Probability Models: An Application to the Analysis of Timing of First Birth
Applied Economics 17,3 (June 1985): 477-489.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036848500000052
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Age at First Birth; Childbearing; Endogeneity; First Birth; Household Structure; Parental Influences; Racial Differences

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Nerlove and Press (1973, 1976) developed a procedure whereby jointly endogenous qualitative variables can be analyzed as functions of continuous or categorical explanatory factors. This method is used to develop the econometric model for the special case of two trichotomous jointly dependent variables. These variables are, in turn, applied to the determinants of age at initiation of childbearing, using data from the NLS Young Women cohort for the period 1968-1978. The results show that parental education, race, and whether the young woman was raised in an intact family emerge as variables with large aggregate effects. Certain factors, such as number of siblings and plans for age 35, are seen to have direct and indirect influences of opposite signs. This analysis demonstrates the potential usefulness of log-linear probability models.
Bibliography Citation
Lehrer, Evelyn. "Log-Linear Probability Models: An Application to the Analysis of Timing of First Birth." Applied Economics 17,3 (June 1985): 477-489.
11. Link, Charles R.
Ratledge, Edward C.
Useful Interactions in Economic Models: The Case of Black/White Earnings Differentials
Applied Economics 9,1 (March 1977): 83-91.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036847700000009
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Earnings; I.Q.; Research Methodology; Schooling; Wage Differentials; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

In this paper, the usefulness of AID (automatic interaction detector) in developing sensible interaction terms in econometric models involving complex relationships is demonstrated. The major goal of the paper is to estimate the impact of a multitude of factors on the labor market success of young black and white males. In summary, used with caution the AID procedure can serve as a useful tool to the econometrician.
Bibliography Citation
Link, Charles R. and Edward C. Ratledge. "Useful Interactions in Economic Models: The Case of Black/White Earnings Differentials." Applied Economics 9,1 (March 1977): 83-91.
12. Meredith, Neil R.
Religious Service Attendance and Labour Force Status: Evidence from Survey Data Using Count Data Methods
Applied Economics 46,34 (December 2014): 4242-4255.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00036846.2014.955253#.VEVtt2N2Rlc
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Health and Retirement Study (HRS); Labor Force Participation; Modeling, Fixed Effects; Religion

I undertake count data estimation with data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort and the Health and Retirement Study to evaluate the relationship between time spent out of the labour force and the frequency of religious service attendance for individuals of working age. I also examine whether being out of the labour force is correlated with the frequency of religious service attendance.

Results using Poisson fixed-effect and negative binomial estimation suggest that men under age 50 appear to attend religious services less frequently when out of the labour force. I ascribe this finding to younger men's religious service attendance being related to having work or the pursuit of work. Men between ages 50 and 65 attend religious services less frequently when out of the labour force, which I attribute to serious health problems in later age forcing labour market exiting and reduced frequency of religious service attendance. Women between ages 50 and 65 attend religious services more frequently when out of the labour force, which I ascribe to having more time to pursue religious activity in addition to women's established proclivity to religious commitment.

Bibliography Citation
Meredith, Neil R. "Religious Service Attendance and Labour Force Status: Evidence from Survey Data Using Count Data Methods." Applied Economics 46,34 (December 2014): 4242-4255.
13. Montizaan, Raymond
Cörvers, Frank
de Grip, Andries
Training and Retirement Patterns
Applied Economics 45,15 (May 2013): 1991-1999.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036846.2011.646066
Cohort(s): Older Men
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Life Cycle Research; Retirement; Skills; Training; Training, Employee

Life-cycle theory predicts that employers enter into implicit contracts with newly hired employees to ensure rent-sharing and to decrease turnover after firm-specific training investments. Typically, these implicit contracts would include both upward sloping earning profiles and mandatory retirement. In this article, we empirically test the prediction that workers with firm-specific skills are restrained in their options to continue working. Therefore, they are more likely to retire at common mandatory retirement dates than those with general skills. Using the US National Longitudinal Survey of Older Men, we find that workers who participated in firm-specific training in their early careers do indeed retire earlier than those with general skills. The results show that compulsory retirement plans force these older workers to retire when they reach the common mandatory retirement age of 65. The results presented in this article are highly relevant for public policies in European and other industrialized countries that aim to increase labour force participation of the elderly. As our study demonstrates, the effectiveness of institutional arrangements to postpone retirement will also depend on training policies of employers and the type of skills workers acquired in the past.
Bibliography Citation
Montizaan, Raymond, Frank Cörvers and Andries de Grip. "Training and Retirement Patterns." Applied Economics 45,15 (May 2013): 1991-1999.
14. Mukhopadhyay, Sankar
Wendel, Jeanne
Is Post-Smoking-Cessation Weight-Gain a Significant Trigger for Relapse?
Applied Economics 43,24 (2011): 3449-3457.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036841003652430
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Body Mass Index (BMI); Ethnic Differences; Smoking (see Cigarette Use); Weight; Women

While the Surgeon General's Consumer Guide lists weight-gain as an important relapse trigger, the 2001 Surgeon General's Report on Women and Smoking concludes, paradoxically, that actual weight-gain during cessation does not appear to predict relapse. This dichotomous view reflects longstanding scientific uncertainty about the role of weight-gain in triggering relapse. This scientific uncertainty, which stems from mixed clinical trial results, is problematic for insurance coverage decisions such as state Medicaid programme decisions to cover or exclude smoking-cessation and weight-control pharmaceuticals. Analysts hypothesize that selection bias may explain the inconsistency between the negative clinical results and the persistent view that weight-gain triggers relapse, if weight-concern is both a key determinant of the transition from 'smoker' to 'ex-smoker,' and a key moderating variable in the relationship between weight-gain and relapse. We therefore use the nationally representative 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97) to test the relapse-trigger hypothesis, and conclude that post-smoking-cessation weight-gain triggers relapse among weight-concerned white women, but it is associated with quitting success among Hispanic women. In addition, our results do not support the hypothesis that the mixed clinical trial results reflect selection bias based on weight-concern.
Bibliography Citation
Mukhopadhyay, Sankar and Jeanne Wendel. "Is Post-Smoking-Cessation Weight-Gain a Significant Trigger for Relapse?" Applied Economics 43,24 (2011): 3449-3457.
15. Owens, Mark F.
Baum, Charles L., II
The Effects of Welfare Vehicle Asset Rules on Vehicle Assets
Applied Economics 44,13 (May 2012): 1603-1619.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036846.2010.548783
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Assets; Legislation; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF); Welfare

Before 1996, households were typically ineligible for welfare if they had assets worth more than $1000, where $1500 from each vehicle's value was excluded from this determination. However, the 1996 welfare reform act began allowing states to increase their asset limits and vehicle exclusions. This may prompt low-income households to reallocate resources to or from vehicles. We examine the effects of state vehicle asset rules on vehicle assets. Results show that liberalizing asset rules increases vehicle assets and that this increase is driven largely by eligible individuals increasing vehicle assets, with no evidence indicating that ineligible individuals reduce vehicle assets to become eligible.
Bibliography Citation
Owens, Mark F. and Charles L. Baum. "The Effects of Welfare Vehicle Asset Rules on Vehicle Assets." Applied Economics 44,13 (May 2012): 1603-1619.
16. Passmore, David L.
Ay, Unal
Rockel, Sheryl
Wade, Barbara
Health and Youth Employment
Applied Economics 15,6 (December 1983): 715-729.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036848300000061
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Duncan Index; Earnings; Employment; Ethnic Groups/Ethnicity; Health Factors; High School Completion/Graduates; Hispanics; Language Problems; Marital Status; Schooling

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The employment of 6.4 percent of United States teenagers and young adults is limited by their health. These young people are less likely to have jobs than youths without health problems. Also, they work fewer hours per week than the youth average, although they earn as much per hour as youth without health limitations. Differences in satisfaction and prestige which youths enjoy from their jobs are not related to the presence of health conditions. Youths who reported health conditions lasting their entire lives are more likely to have jobs than young people recently acquiring their conditions. These relationships are derived from analyses of responses of 11,412 civilian noninstitutionalized youths to the l979 NLSY.
Bibliography Citation
Passmore, David L., Unal Ay, Sheryl Rockel and Barbara Wade. "Health and Youth Employment." Applied Economics 15,6 (December 1983): 715-729.
17. Rao, Neel
Chatterjee, Twisha
Sibling Gender and Wage Differences
Applied Economics 50,15 (2018): 1725-1745.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00036846.2017.1374537
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Family Influences; Gender Differences; Job Search; Siblings; Wage Differentials; Wages

Family influences on economic performance are investigated. In particular, sibship sex composition is related to hourly wages using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. The wages of men are increasing in the proportion of siblings who are brothers, but the wages of women are insensitive to sibling gender. Nonwage outcomes are generally unaffected. Contrasts by age structure and demographic group are also presented. The analysis addresses econometric challenges like the endogeneity of fertility and selection into the workforce. In addition, mechanisms such as labour market interactions, human capital investment and role model effects are documented. A questionnaire on job search indicates a same-gender bias in the use of brothers and sisters in obtaining employment. Developmental and psychological assessments suggest that brothers may be associated with worse childhood home environments and more traditional family attitudes among women. The findings are policy relevant and contribute to an understanding of gender differences and earnings inequality.
Bibliography Citation
Rao, Neel and Twisha Chatterjee. "Sibling Gender and Wage Differences." Applied Economics 50,15 (2018): 1725-1745.
18. Reed, W. Robert
Dahlquist, Julie D.
Do Women Prefer Women's Work?
Applied Economics 26,12 (December 1994): 1133-1144.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036849400000111
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Labor Market Demographics; Occupational Segregation; Occupations, Female; Work Histories

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

A new methodology is implemented to determine whether job characteristics can explain why women are concentrated in low-paying, female-dominated occupations. Extensive information on jobs and labour market histories are collected from the 1982 National Longitudinal Survey, Youth Cohort, for women and men characterized by substantial labour market attachment. Significant differences in nonpecuniary job characteristics between the male and female samples are found to exist. Nevertheless, we find no evidence that women differentially favour those job characteristics commonly associated with 'women's work'.
Bibliography Citation
Reed, W. Robert and Julie D. Dahlquist. "Do Women Prefer Women's Work?" Applied Economics 26,12 (December 1994): 1133-1144.
19. Sicilian, Paul
Grossberg, Adam J.
Investment in Human Capital and Gender Wage Differences: Evidence from the NLSY
Applied Economics 33,4 (2001): 463-471.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840123000
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Gender; Gender Differences; Human Capital; Modeling; Time Use; Training, Off-the-Job; Training, On-the-Job; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate gender differences in returns to various forms of human capital. Since the NLSY includes relatively detailed information regarding on- and off-the-job training, special emphasis is placed on measuring gender differences in the incidence of and returns to formal post-school training. Also considered is the role of non-human capital factors such as industry and occupation in explaining the wage gap. It is found that about 60% of the gender wage gap in the sample is explained by mean differences in individual characteristics and market circumstances. This suggests a smaller role for discrimination in explaining the wage gap than previous research has found. The research indicates that training does not affect the gender wage gap.
Bibliography Citation
Sicilian, Paul and Adam J. Grossberg. "Investment in Human Capital and Gender Wage Differences: Evidence from the NLSY." Applied Economics 33,4 (2001): 463-471.
20. Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr.
A Markov Model of School vs. Work Choices of Black and White Young Men
Applied Economics 14,1 (February 1982): 43-61.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036848200000004
Cohort(s): Young Men
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Data Analysis; Employment; Markov chain / Markov model; Modeling, Logit; Racial Differences; Research Methodology; Schooling; Statistical Analysis

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines the actual school versus labor force participation choices by focusing on the way in which personal and economic factors alter the distribution of such choices. A multinomial logit model is used to predict the cells in Markov transition probability matrices. In addition, the sensitivity of the probability predictions to variation in selected predetermined variables is examined. A secondary goal of this paper is the comparison of empirical results obtained for white and black youths using a procedure implied by Coleman.
Bibliography Citation
Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr. "A Markov Model of School vs. Work Choices of Black and White Young Men." Applied Economics 14,1 (February 1982): 43-61.
21. Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr.
In-School Labor Force Status and Early Post-School Labor Market Outcomes for Young Women
Applied Economics 13,3 (September 1981): 279-302.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036848100000001
Cohort(s): Young Women
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Dropouts; Earnings; Employment, In-School; Health Factors; High School Completion/Graduates; Job Search; Labor Market Outcomes; Marriage; Work Knowledge

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This research analyzes the relationship between a young woman's labor force status when last enrolled in school and her labor market behavior in the first two years after leaving school. The results showed that in-school work increases the early post-school weeks worked and decreases early post-school weeks unemployed. In addition, the overall effects of in-school work are presented in the statistical models in the second part of the study. In racially-pooled analysis, there are two main sets of results: (1) In-school labor force participation raises relative post-school earnings, and post-school hourly wage rates. (2) Post-school weeks unemployed are sharply lower (higher) if the young woman was a part-time worker (unemployed) in school as opposed to an NLF student.
Bibliography Citation
Stephenson, Stanley P., Jr. "In-School Labor Force Status and Early Post-School Labor Market Outcomes for Young Women." Applied Economics 13,3 (September 1981): 279-302.
22. Stevans, Lonnie K.
Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Non-Marital Births in the USA: An Examination of Causality
Applied Economics 28,4 (April 1996): 417-427.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368496328542
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Chapman & Hall
Keyword(s): Aid for Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Endogeneity; Family Characteristics; Fertility; Marital Status; Marriage; Program Participation/Evaluation; Simultaneity; Welfare

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Utilizing a sample of 2,964 unmarried women over the period 1979-1988 from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, a test was performed to determine the causal direction of relationship between receipt of aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) and the decision to have a non-marital birth. The existence of causality is defined as the lack of a simultaneous relationship or joint dependency between these variables. One of the most interesting findings was a failure to reject the hypothesis that these choices are jointly determined. Both were found to depend upon variables that are demographic, economic, personal, and family-related. The profiles derived from the specification and estimation of a simultaneous equation system with discrete endogenous variables depict a woman whose fertility and economic decisions were predominately based on economic deprivation, demographic situation, and family instability. Photocopy available from ABI/INFORM.
Bibliography Citation
Stevans, Lonnie K. "Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and Non-Marital Births in the USA: An Examination of Causality." Applied Economics 28,4 (April 1996): 417-427.
23. White, Roger
Long-Run Wage and Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers
Applied Economics 42,14 (June 2010): 1845-1856.
Also: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840701736206
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Keyword(s): Age and Ageing; College Graduates; Displaced Workers; Earnings; Gender; High School Completion/Graduates; High School Dropouts; Unions

Displacement-related losses are estimated using National Longitudinal Survey of Youth data that span the years 1979-2000. The typical displaced worker faces losses of $34,065 during the period 4 years prior through 5 years following displacement. Proportionally, this represents a 10.8% loss compared to earnings of similar nondisplaced workers over the period. Considerable variation in losses is reported across worker types. Union, male, and more mature workers suffer greater losses, respectively, than do their nonunion, female, and younger counterparts. College graduates and high school dropouts are found to suffer lower losses compared to high school diploma holders and those who completed some college.
Bibliography Citation
White, Roger. "Long-Run Wage and Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers." Applied Economics 42,14 (June 2010): 1845-1856.