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Source: Atlantic Economic Journal
Resulting in 11 citations.
1. Dalton, Amy H.
Marcis, John G.
The Determinants of Job Satisfaction for Young Males and Females
Atlantic Economic Journal 14,3 (September 1986): 85.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/m22555067704762n/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Job Satisfaction; Modeling, Logit; Unemployment, Youth; Working Conditions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The growing role of females in the labor force makes the study of the quality of the workplace important for policy considerations. Logit regression analysis is used to test for the possible existence of gender differences in job satisfaction among young adults. Data are drawn from the 1980 NLSY, a sample consisting of 967 females and 1,230 males. The results indicate gender differences in the determinants of job satisfaction. For males, job satisfaction is more closely associated with general background characteristics, such as education level, marital status, and racial/ethnic differences. Job satisfaction for females is more closely linked with the workplace; for example, the wage rate, experience in the labor market, and job tenure. Five of the seven workplace variables produced conflicting signs on the coefficients for males and females.
Bibliography Citation
Dalton, Amy H. and John G. Marcis. "The Determinants of Job Satisfaction for Young Males and Females." Atlantic Economic Journal 14,3 (September 1986): 85.
2. Ewing, Bradley T.
A Note on School Size and Wages
Atlantic Economic Journal 23,3 (September 1995): 236.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/a12875xp2j25ph07/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Armed Forces Qualifications Test (AFQT); Education Indicators; Human Capital; School Quality; Schooling; Wages

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Much has been written on whether it is school quality or quantity that really matters in determining wages. Thetraditional human capital wage equation controls for the quantity of education (i.e., years of schooling) and generallyignores quality of education. The idea that quality might matter is not new. Hanushek JEL, 1986 reports that standardmeasures of school quality have no effect on wages of men in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY,including faculty-to-student ratio, teacher salaries, expenditures, and so forth). However, some have successfullyargued that school quality is at least as important as quantity by incorporating scores on the Armed ForcesQualification Test (AFQT) in the wage model as a proxy for quality Maxwell, ILR, 1994; O'Neill, JEP, 1990!. Thisnote considers one factor overlooked: what is the effect of high school size on wages controlling for quantity andquality? The hypothesis is that students at large schools must deal with a more diverse set of circumstances and thatfor a given quality and quantity level, they will fare better in the labor market than students from smaller schools.Having been exposed to more people and potentially more diverse cultures and situations, these students are betterequipped to deal with the myriad of work-related situations, such as working in teams and in a culturally diverseenvironment that they will inevitably encounter.
Bibliography Citation
Ewing, Bradley T. "A Note on School Size and Wages." Atlantic Economic Journal 23,3 (September 1995): 236.
3. Gius, Mark Paul
Determinants of the Violent Criminal Behavior of Teenagers
Atlantic Economic Journal 34,4 (2006): 511-512.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/e53035727313r230/
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Crime; Family Influences; Modeling, Probit; Parental Influences; Peers/Peer influence/Peer relations; Teenagers

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Recent research conducted by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse and Columbia University has shown that children who frequently have dinner with their families are much less likely to smoke, drink, or use illicit drugs (Connecticut Post, 2005). An interesting extension of this research would be to determine if family influences have any effect on the propensity of teenagers to commit crimes.

Assuming an individual is a non-adult teenager (ages 12-17), earns no income, and the criminal act is non-monetary in nature, one may model criminal behavior as a utility-maximizing problem. A teenager would attempt to maximize his or her utility by allocating his or her time between criminal and non-criminal activities. The constraint would be total time in a given day. It is assumed that parental and peer influences will affect a teenager's propensity to commit a criminal act. If all influences are positive in nature, then all time is spent pursuing non-criminal activities, since criminal activities are viewed as bads and not goods. If, however, the influences are negative in nature, then the individual would engage in criminal activities, since both criminal activities and leisure would be viewed as goods.

Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "Determinants of the Violent Criminal Behavior of Teenagers." Atlantic Economic Journal 34,4 (2006): 511-512.
4. Gius, Mark Paul
Health Insurance and Young Adults: An Analysis Using the NLSY
Atlantic Economic Journal 38,3 (September 2010): 381-382.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/4q4g367lq80282r8/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Insurance, Health; Regions

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The article focuses on the use of National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) in analyzing the health insurances of young adults in the U.S. The use of the NLSY intends to determine the factors that affect the health insurance coverage of young adults. The logistic regression has been used in formulating the equation of the NLSY.

One group which is typically discussed in regards to its lack of health insurance is the young adult segment of the population. For the age group 18-26, 32% lack health insurance (Holahan and Kenney, Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issue, 2008). For the entire non-elderly population, the uninsured rate is closer to 18%. In addition, although this age group constitutes only 18% of the adult population, it makes up over 28% of the uninsured (Holahan and Kenney, Timely Analysis of Immediate Health Policy Issue, 2008). Because of this, the young adult segment of the population is the ideal group to use in an analysis of the determinants of health insurance coverage.

Several studies have been conducted on health insurance coverage (Markowitz, Gold, and Rice, Medical Care, 1991; Newacheck, et al., Pediatrics, 1999; Callahan and Cooper, Pediatrics, 2005; Gruber, Journal of Economic Literature, 2008; Levine, McKnight, and Heep, NBER Working Paper, 2009; and Gius, International Journal of Applied Economics, 2010). Most of these studies used descriptive statistics and correlation analyses to ascertain the extent of the uninsured. Few looked at the determinants of health insurance coverage, and even fewer examined the insurance coverage rates of young adults.

The purpose of the present study is to determine the factors that affect the health insurance coverage of young adults. This study will use as its data set the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), a data set that has not been used in prior studies on health insurance coverage.

Bibliography Citation
Gius, Mark Paul. "Health Insurance and Young Adults: An Analysis Using the NLSY." Atlantic Economic Journal 38,3 (September 2010): 381-382.
5. Grinberg, Alice
The Effect of Birth Order on Occupational Choice
Atlantic Economic Journal 43,4 (December 2015): 463-476.
Also: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11293-015-9474-2
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Birth Order; Family Size; Occupational Choice

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Research suggests that birth order has a profound influence on personality development, but there has been little research investigating the effect of birth order on a person's occupational choice. A number of psychologists, including Frank Sulloway and Reid Claxton, argue that first-borns are more likely to become managers because their order in the family trains them in managerial and leadership skills. In contrast, several economists, such as Gary Becker, argue that first-borns are often economically successful because they receive more resources from their parents than other children. This occurs both because they tend to have fewer siblings and because they receive their parents' unshared attention before their younger siblings are born. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY) of 1979, we investigate which of these models best accords with the data. We find that first-borns are indeed more likely to select managerial positions than later-borns, but that this effect is due to first-borns having, on average, fewer siblings than others, not to being first-born per se. Further, we find the effect of family size is strongest among lower-income families, lending support to Becker's hypothesis.
Bibliography Citation
Grinberg, Alice. "The Effect of Birth Order on Occupational Choice." Atlantic Economic Journal 43,4 (December 2015): 463-476.
6. Mitra, Aparna
Structural Characteristics of Firms and Industries and Black and White Wage Inequality in the U.S. Economy: 1998
Atlantic Economic Journal 27,2 (June 1999): 179-192.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/2q4063763n41tuu9/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Cognitive Ability; Education; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The effects of firm and job characteristics on the wages of blacks and whites are analyzed using data from the 1988 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The focus is on 2,370 full-time private sector employees. Results show that, first, blacks are disproportionately employed in large establishments despite their lower cognitive achievements. Second, blacks do not enjoy significant wage premiums associated with supervisory positions. Third, although the wage gap between blacks and whites is reduced considerably, controlling for education and cognitive skills, the gap increases significantly when structural abilities are included in the wage regressions despite the large wage premiums associated with employment in large establishments.
Bibliography Citation
Mitra, Aparna. "Structural Characteristics of Firms and Industries and Black and White Wage Inequality in the U.S. Economy: 1998." Atlantic Economic Journal 27,2 (June 1999): 179-192.
7. Mukerjee, Swati
Childhood Bullying and Labor Market Outcomes in The United States
Atlantic Economic Journal 46,3 (September 2018): 313-335.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11293-018-9587-5
Cohort(s): NLSY97
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Bullying/Victimization; Childhood Adversity/Trauma; Earnings; Gender Differences; Labor Market Outcomes

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This paper contributes to a nascent economic literature on bullying. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 data, I explored the relationship between childhood bullying and later earnings. Since males and females are usually subject to different kinds of bullying and coping strategies vary with age, I distinguished between pre-teen and teenage bullying by gender. After delineating the pathways by which being bullied could potentially lead to lower earnings, the analysis first considered the probability of being bullied either as a teenager or before the age of 12. Next, after a simple ordinary least squares analysis of a human capital earnings function, a detailed propensity score analysis with multiple matching schemes was undertaken separately for males and females, further subdivided by when bullying had occurred. Results indicated males bullied as teenagers had earnings 23% lower than their non-bullied counterparts. Females did not suffer this penalty, nor did children who were bullied only below the age of 12. However, being bullied in childhood increased significantly the probability of being bullied later. In terms of human capital formation and possible impact on later productivity, teen bullying may be affecting men the most. Current findings may also be useful in encouraging a targeted focus on those who may be in greater danger of being bullied. Children who have changed schools several times, males with a learning disability, or a vision, speech or hearing problem, and females with some kind of deformity would be targeted significantly more.
Bibliography Citation
Mukerjee, Swati. "Childhood Bullying and Labor Market Outcomes in The United States." Atlantic Economic Journal 46,3 (September 2018): 313-335.
8. Renna, Francesco
King, Randall H.
The Impact of Racial Discrimination on the Early Career Outcomes of Young Men
Atlantic Economic Journal 35,3 (September 2007): 269-278.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/0p171767pw146028/
Cohort(s): NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Discrimination; Economics of Discrimination; Economics of Minorities; Fertility; Labor Market Outcomes; Racial Differences; Wage Differentials; Wage Gap; Wages, Young Men

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

The NLSY dataset is utilized to measure the extent of employer wage discrimination between white and black males during their first 5 years of post-school employment. We look at the respondent's first job and the jobs 1 and 5 years after school completion. Oaxaca wage decompositions are employed to gauge the effect of discrimination. Consistent with our hypothesis, we find that the discrimination component of the wage gap falls over time. For the first job out of school the unexplained wage gap between blacks and whites is 35%. By year 5, the unexplained component falls to about 13%. Thus, while discrimination continues to play a role in explaining the white-black wage gap over time, its impact decreases as time in the labor market increases.
Bibliography Citation
Renna, Francesco and Randall H. King. "The Impact of Racial Discrimination on the Early Career Outcomes of Young Men." Atlantic Economic Journal 35,3 (September 2007): 269-278.
9. Roche, Kristen
Millennials and the Gender Wage Gap in the U.S.: A Cross-Cohort Comparison of Young Workers Born in the 1960s and the 1980s
Atlantic Economic Journal 45,3 (September 2017): 333-350.
Also: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11293-017-9546-6
Cohort(s): NLSY79, NLSY97
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Gender Differences; Wage Gap

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Using two cohorts of young workers born in the early 1960s and early 1980s, this paper analyzes the temporal change in the U.S. gender wage gap and its determinants, which persists for both explained and unexplained reasons. Results suggest that the gender wage gap closed four (seven) percentage points at the mean (median) between cohorts. It finds cross-cohort evidence that young females' increasing returns to marriage and a changing occupational wage structure contributed to a narrowing of the gap. Nonetheless, the majority of this convergence remains unexplained due to relative improvements in unobservable institutional factors or heterogeneity for females. Compared to the previous generation, millennials likely entered a more progressive, female-friendly labor market. It is also possible that female millennials are more ambitious and competitive in their early years of work experience relative to females born in the 1960s.
Bibliography Citation
Roche, Kristen. "Millennials and the Gender Wage Gap in the U.S.: A Cross-Cohort Comparison of Young Workers Born in the 1960s and the 1980s." Atlantic Economic Journal 45,3 (September 2017): 333-350.
10. Solberg, Eric J.
The Supply of Labor Time of Mature Females
Atlantic Economic Journal 9,3 (September 1981): 20-33.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/40568m9j22432250/
Cohort(s): Mature Women
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Employment; Life Cycle Research; Marital Dissolution

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

This study examines female supply to the labor force. Increasingly, women will behave more like their male counterparts over time. Most remain on that part of the supply curve which is positively sloped; however, females without a spouse tend to move toward the backward bending segment of the curve.
Bibliography Citation
Solberg, Eric J. "The Supply of Labor Time of Mature Females." Atlantic Economic Journal 9,3 (September 1981): 20-33.
11. Welsch, David M.
Zimmer, David M.
The Effect of Health and Poverty on Early Childhood Cognitive Development
Atlantic Economic Journal 38,1 (March 2010): 37-49.
Also: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w20647hx14h16u6v/
Cohort(s): Children of the NLSY79
Publisher: International Atlantic Economic Society
Keyword(s): Birthweight; Child Health; Cognitive Development; Heterogeneity; Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Math); Peabody Individual Achievement Test (PIAT- Reading); Poverty; Socioeconomic Status (SES)

Permission to reprint the abstract has not been received from the publisher.

Although evidence of a link between socioeconomic status and child health has been researched extensively, much less attention has been devoted to studying the link between child health and cognitive development. This paper seeks to determine whether early childhood illnesses and poverty significantly impede cognitive development. The empirical model attempts to control for observed and unobserved heterogeneity through the use of panel data models. Results indicate that a child's cognitive development is not directly related to health problems acquired after birth or socioeconomic standing. Rather, cognitive development is primarily influenced by unobserved child- and family-specific factors that happen to be correlated with health and socioeconomic status. On the other hand, birth weight appears to affect cognitive performance later in childhood, even after taking unobserved heterogeneity into account. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Bibliography Citation
Welsch, David M. and David M. Zimmer. "The Effect of Health and Poverty on Early Childhood Cognitive Development." Atlantic Economic Journal 38,1 (March 2010): 37-49.